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    William Maley

    2017 Acura NSX to Start At $157,800*

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      How Much for the Acura NSX?


    We knew when Acura was going to launch the NSX, it would come with a hefty price tag. We were not surprised when the announcement came down that the 2017 NSX would have a starting price of $167,500 (includes an $1,800 destination charge). A fully loaded model will set you back $207,500.

     

    The NSX packs a twin-turbo V6 paired with a set of electric motors that produce a total output of 573 horsepower. This is paired to a nine-speed automatic and Acura's SH-AWD system.

     

    Acura says ordering will begin on February 25th, along with an online configurator to see what you can customize on a NSX.

     

    Acura also announced that NSX VIN 001 will go up for auction at Barrett-Jackson's Scottsdale auction in January. Proceeds will go to the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation and Camp Southern Ground.

     

    Source: Acura

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Acura Shares Details of Next-Generation Acura NSX Sales Plan

    • 2017 Acura NSX U.S. MSRP set at $156,000
    • First 2017 NSX to be auctioned for charity at Barrett-Jackson in January
    • Online configurator and customer order taking to begin Feb. 25


    TORRANCE, Calif. (Dec. 18, 2015) – Acura today announced additional launch details for the next-generation 2017 Acura NSX supercar, coming to market next spring, including pricing and the order taking process. Acura also revealed plans to auction off the very first serial production NSX, VIN 001, at the Barrett-Jackson collector car auction in Scottsdale, Ariz. the last week of January 2016. All proceeds from the auction sale will go to a pair of children's charities: the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation and Camp Southern Ground, the passion project of Grammy Award-winning artist Zac Brown.

     

    Designed, developed and manufactured in America, the 2017 Acura NSX will have a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)1 of $156,000 in the U.S. and will top out at $205,700 when equipped with all available factory features and options1. As Acura's first build-to-order vehicle, customers will be able to design their NSX by selecting one of eight rich exterior colors and four interior color schemes available in three different seating surface options. Customers can further customize their NSX through several exterior and interior features including three wheel designs with painted or polished finish, carbon-ceramic brake options, a carbon fiber interior sport package, carbon fiber roof, and more.

     

    "The NSX is the pinnacle expression of Acura precision crafted performance and we're thrilled to take the next step toward bringing it to market," said Jon Ikeda, vice president and general manager of the Acura Division. "We're creating new space within the supercar realm, pushing the envelope beyond the conventional thinking about supercars – just like the original NSX."

     

    Customer order taking for the new NSX will begin on Feb. 25, 2016 at authorized NSX retailers, in concert with the launch of a vehicle configurator on Acura.com. The configurator will be the first engagement point for customers interested in exploring the process of ordering a vehicle from an authorized NSX retailer and enthusiasts who want to configure their dream NSX. Once customers have customized their vehicle online, they can schedule an appointment with an authorized NSX retailer to finalize the order.

     

    The 2017 NSX will be the first all-new Acura vehicle to be auctioned for the benefit of charitable organizations – certified to be the very first serial production NSX. The winner will be able to customize their NSX to their choosing.

     

    "The very first production NSX will be such a special and historic vehicle, so we wanted to make sure we treat the sale of it in an equally special way," said Ikeda. "It will be available for purchase by anyone – anyone that is, who submits the highest bid for VIN number 001 at the world famous Barrett-Jackson auction. And we're pleased to be able to support two incredible children's charities, Camp Southern Ground and the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, with the NSX."

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    There are a lot of other better options out there for that money.   Even if the NSX is fast and handles well, it doesn't look that cool.  An Aston Martin might be slower, but it will sound a hell of a lot better with the throaty V8 or V12 exhaust, and you'll look like James Bond in it.   $150,000-200,000 for a V6 and the honda/acura corporate face is just a big ask.

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    I LOOOOOVE Aston Martin...

    If I had to wear a suit to work everyday and worked Down Town Montreal  or Old Montreal, obviously making the money necessary to own one of these, Id definitely be an owner of one.

     

    But...being that I flip hamburgers and serve hot dogs for a living, negating the need for a suit, and had I been single of course, this NSX as a daily driver fits my style just nicely.

     

    I guess in a way, Ive got it covered.

     

    I drive  a 2012 Acura TL SH-AWD and the wife drives a 2013 Ford Fusion...

    Id say we are living the life....on the cheap...

     

    Kinda like....Chinese Knock-off style...

    Canal Street NYC type deal...even the city I live in...Montreal...its like a cheap version of NYC...or it used to be anyways...mind you...the French Joie de Vivre attitude of Montreal is far more cooler than the "City That Never Sleeps" attitude of NYC...

    Edited by oldshurst442

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    579HP cool, but what is the torque, I have to imagine this is one of those over rated dual overhead cam engines with 300+ torque and 579HP. Pathetic.

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    I am bored with this car and enthusiasts are bored with this car. The 5 year birthing process is going to kill this model, it's been in video games for years and you can't even buy it yet. Rabid Honda fans will snatch up the early production runs, but by year two or three volume will plummet to numbers like the Viper and Cadillac ELR.

     

    Even at a conceptual level, I'm not feeling this thing. An NSX with hybrid AWD, a turbo engine, and no manual transmission. It's not really an NSX at all. If they sold a featherweight version of this car with RWD and the slickest manual transmission on the planet for under 6 figures, they could change my mind.

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    Tesla does it better than this and that is pure electric.

     

    Over rated, over sold from a marketing stand point and now 3 years too late. 

     

    FAILURE on many fronts.

     

    Auto Blog has a video of them driving this new NSX.

     

    http://www.autoblog.com/2015/12/18/2017-acura-nsx-pricing-info-official/

     

    The video shows more interior harmonic noise than a proper burble of a powerful engine. Externally you get that tinny Asian can sound that just sucks. That is the Sport+ mode, Sport is even more Tinny and Quiet mode goes EV.

     

    Some cool technology including the Brake by Wire. You have electronic brakes and they simulate a brake pulse feel but there really is none. Good video and now I really see that car as an interesting technology study, but not inspired as a performance auto.

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      View full article
    • By William Maley
      For the past decade, Acura has felt lost at sea. Not sure of what it wanted to be as a brand. This was shown by mixed messaging in their lineup as they weren’t sure to focus on luxury, technology, or sport. This muddled mess of identities would cause a fair amount of issues. But in the past couple of years, Acura started to get its act together thanks in part to new leadership. The first fruits of their efforts came last year in the form of the third-generation RDX. 
      It has been over two years since I last drove an Acura, so when the opportunity for an RDX A-Spec landed on my desk, I took it with both hands. It was time to see what Acura has been up to and if they’re taking a step in the right direction. 
      You Want Presence? You Got It!
      The RDX is the first production model to feature Acura’s newest design language and its no shrinking violet. The front end draws your attention with a large trapezoidal grille paired with a massive Acura emblem. Sitting on either side is Acura’s Jewel-Eye LED headlights that add a distinctive touch. My A-Spec tester takes it further with distinctive front and rear bumpers, 20-inch alloy wheels finished in black, and a special Apex Blue Pearl color that is only available on this trim. This crossover garnered a lot of looks during the week I had, something I hadn’t experience in quite some time.
      Cozy, Polarizing Interior
      The RDX’s interior captures the feeling of being in a sports car with a symmetrical dashboard design that cocoons the front passengers. A rotary drive-mode selector found in the center stack echos the design found in the NSX supercar. While it does emphasize the sporty nature of the vehicle, the position of the knob does make the climate controls a bit hard to reach. A-Spec models have some special touches such as red contrast stitching, a suede panel on the passenger side of the dashboard, and new trim for the instrument cluster that help it stand out. Material and build quality are quite close to some competitors from Germany.
      A set of sport seats with increased bolstering and power adjustments come standard on the A-Spec. I found them to be quite comfortable for any trip length and were able to hold me if I decided to be a bit enthusiastic. Back seat passengers will be plenty comfortable with an abundance of head and legroom. I would have like to see the back seat be able to slide forward and back to offer more comfort. Cargo space is towards the top of the class with 29.5 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 58.9 when folded. There’s also a little storage nook under the cargo floor to stash valuables.
      Intuitive Infotainment?
      Acura’s previous infotainment system drew a lot of ire from people. The dual-screen layout was confusing as some functions were split between the two screens such as changing the audio input. Not helping was the two different control methods for this setup; touchscreen for the bottom portion and a controller for the top screen. Thankfully, Acura has introduced a new infotainment system for the RDX. A large 10.2-inch screen sits on top of the dash and is controlled by a touchpad on the center console. Seeing the touchpad for the first time sent chills down my spine as I thought back to my frustrating experiences with Lexus’ Touchpad Controller. But Acura says this controller is much easier and logical to use than competitors. Okay, challenge accepted.
      Acura’s touchpad controller is slightly different from Lexus’ setup as it is mapped to the screen. So if you want to access the navigation, you tap that part of the pad that corresponds to the screen. This removes the dragging of the finger across the touchpad to get it to the selection you want. This seems quite logical on paper, but I found to be somewhat frustrating. It took me a few days to mind-meld with the system as I was still used to dragging my finger across the touchpad to select various functions. This made simple tasks such as changing presets or moving around in Apple CarPlay very tough.
      There is also a smaller touchpad that controls a small section of the screen. This allows you to scroll through three menus - audio, navigation, and clock. This would prove to be the most frustrating aspect of this system as it didn’t always recognize whenever I scroll down on the touchpad to move to another screen.
      Thankfully, Acura has left a number of physical controls for the audio and climate systems. I’m glad that some luxury automakers aren’t falling into the trap.
      Powertrain Goes Back To Its Roots
      The RDX has always found itself with a different powertrain throughout its various generations. The first version used a turbo-four engine, while the second-generation moved to a V6. For the third-generation, Acura went back to the RDX’s roots and settled on another turbo-four engine. The 2.0L engine punches out 272 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a 10-speed automatic and either front or my tester’s Super-Handling all-wheel drive system.
      The turbo-four is quite a potent engine with little turbo lag when leaving a stop and a seemingly endless amount of power for any situation. The ten-speed automatic is very smooth and quick when upshifting. But it does stumble somewhat when you need a quick shot of speed. 
      I did notice that the 2.0L turbo isn’t a quiet engine when traveling on the expressway, going above 2,000 rpm when traveling at 70 mph. This may explain the slightly disappointing 21.7 mpg average I got during the week. EPA fuel economy figures for the A-Spec SH-AWD are 21 City/26 Highway/23 Combined. The standard RDX models see a small bump in their EPA fuel economy figures.
      Capable Driver
      Acura is no stranger to building a crossover that is good to drive, the larger MDX crossover is a prime example. But the RDX A-Spec takes that a step further. This version gets a slightly stiffer suspension setup which negates a fair amount of body roll on a winding road. The steering firms up nicely when pushed through corners. When going through the daily grind, the RDX A-Spec will let in a few more bumps and road imperfections due to its suspension tuning. Road and wind noise are kept to very minimal levels.
      Welcome Back Acura
      The 2020 RDX shows that Acura is starting to figure out what it wants to be; a brand that offers something playful in the class. The RDX certainly has the qualities with a bold exterior, punchy turbo-four, and a surprising chassis that offers sporty handling and a mostly-comfortable ride. The slightly-confounding infotainment system and poor fuel economy figures do sour it a bit. But the RDX is a very compelling alternative to many compact luxury crossovers.
      It does give me hope that Acura is figuring out who it wants to be and excited to see what comes down the road such as the new TLX.
      How I Would Configure An RDX: For me, I would basically take the exact RDX tester seen here. That will set me back $47,195 after adding destination and $400.00 paint option. Everyone else should look at the Technology package that will get you most of the safety equipment that is part of Acurawatch, along with a 12-speaker ELS audio system, navigation, and parking sensors. It will not break the bank at $41,000 for FWD or $43,000 for AWD.
      Disclaimer: Acura Provided the RDX, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Acura
      Model: RDX
      Trim: A-Spec
      Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve VTEC Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: 10-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 272 @ 6,500
      Torque @ RPM: 280 @ 1,600 - 4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/26/23
      Curb Weight: 4,015 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: East Liberty, Ohio
      Base Price: $45,800
      As Tested Price: $47,195 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Exterior Color - $400.00
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