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    Dodge: Dart R/T Is Coming.. No Really, It Is


    By William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    February 6, 2013

    When Dodge introduced the Dart GT at the Detroit Auto Show in January, many wondered if this was to take place of the Dart R/T since the two model shared many common features; most notably the 2.4L Tigershark four-cylinder engine. However Dodge says the R/T is coming that will be a true performance version.

    “(The R/T version) is going to come, and (the Dart) will continue to improve,” said Dodge CEO Reid Bigland.

    Chrysler chief designer and SRT President and CEO Ralph Gilles tells Wards Auto that it is wise of Dodge reserve the R/T badging “for something more aggressive, more special.” Gilles goes onto say the GT model provides a space between the Limited and and a “potential R/T in the future. The R/T Charger and R/T Challenger have set the bar pretty high. It’s just trying to go back to where that name really means something.”

    Source: Wards Auto

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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