Jump to content
  • Welcome Guest!

    Founded in 2001, CheersandGears.com is one of the oldest continuously running automotive enthusiast communities on the net. 

    Sign up is free and easy, come join the fun!

  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Shelby GT350 Owners Sue Ford Over Overheating Issues

    The Shelby GT350 not so track ready? A new lawsuit alleges this

    A group of Shelby GT350 owners are not happy with Ford.

    Yesterday, a lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida claiming that the track-ready GT350 isn't. According to filling, owners complain that the vehicle overheats in as little as 15 minutes due faulty transmissions and rear differentials when driven on a track. When the vehicle does overheat, it goes into a limp mode that reduces power to protect the powertrain. The filing goes on to say that Ford fixed this issue in the 2017 model, but told owners of the 2016 model to make the fixes themselves - a possible breach of the car's warranty.

    “When Ford marketed and sold these Shelby GT350 Mustangs, it knew exactly how to appeal to track-enthusiasts: it marketed enhanced performance in a limited-edition iconic vehicle that has been associated with racing for generations,” said Steve Berman, managing partner of Hagens Berman, the law firm handling the case.

    “We believe that Ford induced purchasers with its ‘track-ready’ marketing, when in fact it knew that this defect would ultimately bar these Mustangs from ever being the hotrod consumers paid for.”

    At the moment, the lawsuit has four named plaintiffs. Hagens Berman estimates about 4,000 owners are affected by this issue. 

    “Ford is committed to providing our customers with top-quality vehicles. However, we do not comment on pending litigation,” said Ford spokesman Bradley Carroll to The Detroit News.

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), The Detroit News


    Sign in to follow this  
    Sign in to follow this  

    User Feedback




    OUCH, this is going to hurt Ford if they do not step up and fix the issue for customers. Just like the Corvette engine issue which GM stepped up and fixed once they figured out the problem. If Ford made the change to address the problem in the 2017, then they need to step up and take care of the 2016 customers. Telling them no and fix it yourself is a sure fire way to not only loose customers but also loose future customers.

    Be interesting to see how this plays out.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    27 minutes ago, FordCosworth said:

    Owners should have purchased the " Track Package " - comes with transmission and diff cooler, amongst other items, that turn the base GT350 into a track terror.

     

    Couple of questions as Im feeling lazy to research it myself. (because it seems you are informed on this...)

    1. Base 2016 GT350 out of the box not track ready?

    2. Option box available on base 2016 GT350 to make it track ready such as you stated {" Track Package " - comes with transmission and diff cooler, amongst other items} because base GT350 does not come standard with this?

    3. I seem to remember FoMoCo advertising the GT350 as out of the box track ready...am I correct in assuming this?

    If so...maybe some owners were mislead?

    4. As per the article, it seems that problems were fixed for 2017, is it because what you stated...{" Track Package " - comes with transmission and diff cooler, amongst other items}...were finally made STANDARD equipment?

     

    Edited by oldshurst442

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Of course the Plaintiff attorneys want to say that 4,000 owners could be affected as opposed to only 4 parties.  If you have 4,000 plaintiffs that "suffer damages" to their "non-track ready" GT350s, then at $1,250 per plaintiff, you can get a certified class action at the minimum amount of $5MM.  Of course, how many GT350 owners actually have driven their cars on the track, much less driven their cars at all?  The current GT350 is another darling of the auction circuit where it is better to have the "low miles, limited production" car increase in value to be modern classic.

    The latest C7 ZO6 had similar issues but that was based upon those owners who ACTUALLY drive the car on the track the way it should be driven.  Chevrolet has addressed the issues appropriately and people have moved on.  Except the trial lawyers.  They will find any excuse to create drama and litigation over absolutely nothing just so they can cash in on their 30% contingency fee.

    If only I had the luxury of being one of the aggrieved owners of the GT350 to contemplate such a litigious endeavor.....

    • Upvote 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    4 hours ago, aurora97 said:

    Of course the Plaintiff attorneys want to say that 4,000 owners could be affected as opposed to only 4 parties.  If you have 4,000 plaintiffs that "suffer damages" to their "non-track ready" GT350s, then at $1,250 per plaintiff, you can get a certified class action at the minimum amount of $5MM.  Of course, how many GT350 owners actually have driven their cars on the track, much less driven their cars at all?  The current GT350 is another darling of the auction circuit where it is better to have the "low miles, limited production" car increase in value to be modern classic.

    The latest C7 ZO6 had similar issues but that was based upon those owners who ACTUALLY drive the car on the track the way it should be driven.  Chevrolet has addressed the issues appropriately and people have moved on.  Except the trial lawyers.  They will find any excuse to create drama and litigation over absolutely nothing just so they can cash in on their 30% contingency fee.

    If only I had the luxury of being one of the aggrieved owners of the GT350 to contemplate such a litigious endeavor.....

    I soooo wanna agree with your post.

    But this opinion comes along:

    1 hour ago, regfootball said:

    does anyone durability test their product anymore?

    and I change my POV INSTANTLY!!!

    4 hours ago, aurora97 said:

    Of course, how many GT350 owners actually have driven their cars on the track, much less driven their cars at all?

    It aint about that at all..a product has to perform as it was promised it would perform regardless what the customer/owner does with it, barring abuse and usage outside what the product was meant and engineered for...

    If the 1st year GT3500 was sold to the public as track ready from the box, and from the pic @surreal1272 posted it sure looks like it was, and from the article stating that Ford took care of that problem for the 2017 model, PROVING that Ford knew there was heat soak problems for the track ready 1st year GT350, then what Reg says:

    1 hour ago, regfootball said:

    does anyone durability test their product anymore?

    HOLDS PRECEDENCE AND HOLDS TRUTH!!!

    Frivolous lawsuit?

    Maybe...but unscrupulous business practices in misinforming and refusing to assist its loyal customer and fan base may also be the case...

     

     

    Edited by oldshurst442

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    1 hour ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    I would think track use would void the warranty and nullify their claims.   That is a non-standard use of the product. 

    Good point.

    It happens all the time!!!

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/05/the-2015-mustang-burnout-switch-and-forbidden-buttons/

     

    Quote

     

    When the E46 M3 debuted with the SMG, the Internet was abuzz with a super-secret code launch control, a series of switches and actions roughly akin to Mario Brothers cheat codes. The engine would rev, the brakes would hold and the clutch would drop. The owner was rewarded with a tire-smoking, neck-snapping, launch as the M3 hurled into the future. The internet spurred rumors of null warranties, technician shenanigans and dealer witch hunts. The conspiracy theory held the belief the computer inside the M3 would track how many times this it happened, and anything more than eight would void the warranty on your German super touring sedan.

     The theories were not without precedent. Mitsubishi dealers were accused of trolling SCCA results and voiding the warranties of Evo customer’s cars, and Subaru was also called out for doing the same with WRX buyers.  A close buddy was told by his service tech to pull the SCCA inspection sticker off his doorjamb before the senior manager saw it.

     Then Nissan introduced Godzilla, complete with what became known as the “void warranty” selection on the center console. A class action lawsuit later, and Nissan came revised to the launch control software and plaintiffs were rewarded with a free oil change.

    And now, Ford has their “burnout button.”

     When engaged locked the front brakes and allows the rear tires to break traction in order to dust them off and heat them up for a optimized drag launch. In the aforementioned fine print, engagement in racing will void your warranty.

     

    At least Nissan revised their technique with a free oil change...

    Quote

    Then Nissan introduced Godzilla, complete with what became known as the “void warranty” selection on the center console. A class action lawsuit later, and Nissan came revised to the launch control software and plaintiffs were rewarded with a free oil change.

     

    But in this heat soak episode, it aint about racing or non-standard use of the product nullifying the warranty and the owners trying to reverse that reality , it really is selling a product failing to achieve its performance promises...we dont know if those 4 owners (and possibly 4000 more...frivolous litigation) if they care about their warranty nullification if they track their GT350...

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    I would think track use would void the warranty and nullify their claims.   That is a non-standard use of the product. 

    Normally I would agree except they sold this auto as a track ready auto. The Marketing was clearly intent on people buying it and taking it to the track. Ford has to step up here and fix the problem since they sold it as being able to handle this use.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    25 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    Normally I would agree except they sold this auto as a track ready auto. The Marketing was clearly intent on people buying it and taking it to the track. Ford has to step up here and fix the problem since they sold it as being able to handle this use.

    I do wonder, though, how many of the 65 yr old guys that buy these actually take them on the track?   1/2 of 1 percent? 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    1 hour ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    I do wonder, though, how many of the 65 yr old guys that buy these actually take them on the track?   1/2 of 1 percent? 

    True, those are the ones with the money and are thinking, buy this, store it and sell it in a few years for far more money.

    I question that thinking but figure many are thinking this way.

    I could have bought and sat on my Trailblazer AWD SS, but no I wanted to enjoy driving it. That is what the auto is for.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    38 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    True, those are the ones with the money and are thinking, but this, store it and sell it in a few years for far more money.

    I question that thinking but figure many are thinking this way.

    I could have bought and sat on my Trailblazer AWD SS, but no I wanted to enjoy driving it. That is what the auto is for.

    The funny thing is I've seen a fair number of Shelbys out and about in the Phoenix area, and almost always it's a older guy... (I can relate, my Dad still loved driving his '69 Mustang and my '87 Mustang GT occasionally when he was 75...)

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    1 minute ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    The funny thing is I've seen a fair number of Shelbys out and about in the Phoenix area, and almost always it's a older guy... 

    Cool, glad to hear that they are being driven. That would justify your question of how many of these are taking them to the track?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I don't know about track, haven't done that yet.  However, I saw two GT350 at the autocross events last season.  Owners weren't old guys either.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    There needs to be a tangible damage model for this to move forward in court.

    The car "overheated" when driving "on the track" and what repairs were needed, if any, after that experience?

    How often did this happen and how much did it cost?

    If the Track Pack cost on the cars is $6,500 and the repairs cost less than that, then where is the damage to the privileged GT350 owner?

    If Ford wants to issue a recall, install the Track Pack on all GT350 cars without the Track Pack option, and spend the money that way, then Ford wins.

    The upgraded GT350 cars hold their value.

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    On 3/23/2017 at 11:27 PM, regfootball said:

    does anyone durability test their product anymore?

    Ford probably doesn't do much.  I wonder why people wanting a track ready sports car are buying a Mustang to begin with.  A Mustang is designed to sell to rental fleet size in Florida among other things.  Even an Ecoboost Mustang is under $30k so you can't expect them to turn a run of the mill car into a durable track race car.  If you want a track car buy a Porsche, that can hold up to the abuse.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    10 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    Ford probably doesn't do much.  I wonder why people wanting a track ready sports car are buying a Mustang to begin with.  A Mustang is designed to sell to rental fleet size in Florida among other things.  Even an Ecoboost Mustang is under $30k so you can't expect them to turn a run of the mill car into a durable track race car.  If you want a track car buy a Porsche, that can hold up to the abuse.

    "Ford probably doesn't do much". Really? Ford has an extensive racing and proving ground history and you think that they probably don't do much testing? Wow, is all I have to say here. I will say this though. You clearly don't follow much racing or else you would never say such a silly thing.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    On ‎3‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 2:04 PM, William Maley said:

    The filing goes on to say that Ford fixed this issue in the 2017 model, but told owners of the 2016 model to make the fixes themselves - a possible breach of the car's warranty.

    That line is pretty much horseshet. Completely uncalled for on Ford's part.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×