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    FCA, Ford Throw Their Hats Into The Mail Truck Bidding


    • Two automakers join the competition for the next mail truck

    The U.S. Postal Service are looking for new delivery trucks to replace the current fleet - some which are around 20 years old. The Detroit News reports that there are 15 companies that range from military, mass-transit, specialized transportation, and two automakers. Those two automakers are Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Ford.

    Now building a vehicle for the U.S. Postal Service isn't as easy as you might think. Here the requirements the vehicle must meet:

    • Last at least 20 years
    • Carry a minimum payload of 1,500 pounds
    • Pass safety and emissions requirements
    • Share similar design characteristics of the current vehicle

    “We are seeking a larger vehicle that will enable our employees to work safely and efficiently while standing inside of it. Replacing the aging light delivery fleet, much of which is 21 years or older, will also help to reduce operating and repair costs for vehicles, while simultaneously improving overall safety and efficiency of delivery operations,” said Postal Service spokeswoman Sarah Ninivaggi.

    Now there a lot of money on the line - the potential contact includes supplying up to 180,000 vehicles at $25,000 to $35,000 per vehicle, or about $4.5 to $6.3 billion total.

    Both FCA and Ford declined to comment on this.

    Source: The Detroit News

    Photo Credit: Untitled by Zena C is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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    FCA probably thinks they have a real shot at this, not yet realizing the requirement was "years" instead of the 'months' they read the first time through.

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    :roflmao:

     

    So very True, FCA figures 20 months could make an auto last that. 20 years, that is another story.

     

    I think GM should do this, they could use the platform for the Colorado / Canyon and make a proper auto for them with CNG fueling.

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