Jump to content
  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Opel Reveals A New 1.6L Turbo

    Sign in to follow this  

    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    October 10, 2012

    Opel has revealed a new 1.6L turbocharged four-cylinder that will be part of a new engine family coming out within the next few years. The 1.6L engine uses an aluminum block and spark ignition direct injection (SIDI). Opel says the new engine improves fuel efficiency by 13%.

    In standard form, the 1.6L Eco Turbo produces 168 HP and 206 lb-ft of torque. In the Performance Turbo model, power is upped to 197 HP and 221 lb-ft of torque.

    The new 1.6L turbo will be appearing first in the new Cascada cabriolet in 2013, with other models following thereafter.

    There is no word if this new engine will be coming over to the U.S., but when asked ,officials said it's “under consideration”.

    Source: Autoweek

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Sign in to follow this  


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Encore and Verano need that, and optional for the Cruze. Then Buick at least has some separation from Chevy, rather than having the same powertrain.

    • Upvote 1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I would guess that any vehicle that is Opel based would be first in line to get it. So in the US that means Encore, Verano, and Regal.... though I believe Regal to be least likely to get it in the current generation.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I generally don't favor turbocharged setup with much higher torque figures than hp numbers. There is only one conclusion you can draw from such figures, and that is that the turbocharger is undersized and over boosted.

    Let me explain... 206 lb-ft is 206 hp at 5252rpm. What that means is that the power peak arrives at some engine speed lower that. Assuming a flat torque plateau the power peak is probably around 4300 rpm. You can also get 168 hp if you boost the engine to say a mere 160 lb-ft but carry it to 5500 rpm. Generally speaking the effective mass air flow in both power peak instances are about the same and generally speaking the same turbine/compressor pairing would be used in both. The only reason the engine is not about 220 hp @ 5500 rpm is because the selected turbo is too small and runs out of airflow capacity above about 168 hp.

    There are two reasons why taking an engine with a very small turbo to relatively high boost at lower rpms then having to back off quite early (in the 4000s) to avoid overspeeding the turbo is not ideal. First of all, a 168hp @ 5500 rpm / 160 lb-ft @ 1500~5500 rpm engine is far more linear and enjoyable to drive. Turbolag getting to 160 lb-ft will be significantly less than getting to 206 lb-ft, also the engine won't feel like it's running short of breath early in the mid-4000s. A 168 hp @ 4300 rpm / 206 lb-ft @ 2300~4300 engine feels like a diesel!

    The second reason is one of efficiency. A significant factor affecting fuel economy is the compression ratio of the engine. This is because the compression ratio in an Otto cycle is it's expansion ratio and a larger expansion ratio extracts more energy from each ounce of fuel burned. If you take an engine to about 100 lb-ft / liter you can have a 10.5~11.0:1 compression with direct injection with a boost pressure of about 10~11 psi. If you want to take the engine to about 130 lb-ft / liter you need about 18 psi of boost which means your compression (even with DI) needs to go down to about 9.0~9.3:1. That in and of itself is worth about 10% mpg (3~4 mpg) in a small engine in a small car.

    Small turbo, high torque, low hp is the worst of both worlds. It has the increased lag and reduced economy of an engine with a larger turbo and about 130 hp/liter, while not having the power and performance.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I generally don't favor turbocharged setup with much higher torque figures than hp numbers. There is only one conclusion you can draw from such figures, and that is that the turbocharger is undersized and over boosted.

    Let me explain... 206 lb-ft is 206 hp at 5252rpm. What that means is that the power peak arrives at some engine speed lower that. Assuming a flat torque plateau the power peak is probably around 4300 rpm. You can also get 168 hp if you boost the engine to say a mere 160 lb-ft but carry it to 5500 rpm. Generally speaking the effective mass air flow in both power peak instances are about the same and generally speaking the same turbine/compressor pairing would be used in both. The only reason the engine is not about 220 hp @ 5500 rpm is because the selected turbo is too small and runs out of airflow capacity above about 168 hp.

    There are two reasons why taking an engine with a very small turbo to relatively high boost at lower rpms then having to back off quite early (in the 4000s) to avoid overspeeding the turbo is not ideal. First of all, a 168hp @ 5500 rpm / 160 lb-ft @ 1500~5500 rpm engine is far more linear and enjoyable to drive. Turbolag getting to 160 lb-ft will be significantly less than getting to 206 lb-ft, also the engine won't feel like it's running short of breath early in the mid-4000s. A 168 hp @ 4300 rpm / 206 lb-ft @ 2300~4300 engine feels like a diesel!

    The second reason is one of efficiency. A significant factor affecting fuel economy is the compression ratio of the engine. This is because the compression ratio in an Otto cycle is it's expansion ratio and a larger expansion ratio extracts more energy from each ounce of fuel burned. If you take an engine to about 100 lb-ft / liter you can have a 10.5~11.0:1 compression with direct injection with a boost pressure of about 10~11 psi. If you want to take the engine to about 130 lb-ft / liter you need about 18 psi of boost which means your compression (even with DI) needs to go down to about 9.0~9.3:1. That in and of itself is worth about 10% mpg (3~4 mpg) in a small engine in a small car.

    Small turbo, high torque, low hp is the worst of both worlds. It has the increased lag and reduced economy of an engine with a larger turbo and about 130 hp/liter, while not having the power and performance.

    First off, can you please correct this sentence since it makes no sense at the start of your 2nd paragraph. "What that means is that the power peak arrives at some engine speed lower that."

    Second, your first statement would seem to imply that if they have an undersized turbo and over boosted, then you would have early death of the turbo charger. Is that what you are implying?

    So then if we go with your line of thought, the performance version at 197hp and 221lb-ft of torque would be a bigger turbo charger, but still undersized and over boosted and this would lead one to think that GM is planning on having these things die by 100,000 miles.

    With GM working so hard to change a persons mind, I have a hard time believing they would do this.

    The pictures and info on these links is pretty cool. Looks like a nice little engine.

    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2012/05/opel-announces-all-new-1-6l-turbo-engine-range/

    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2012/08/genera-motors-commences-4-cylinder-powertrain-renewal-with-1-6l-turbo-ecotec/

    Exciting is according to this web site, this engine will have dual rails so it can also run CNG! :D

    http://green.autoblog.com/2008/05/15/gm-launches-two-new-turbocharged-engines/

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    First off, can you please correct this sentence since it makes no sense at the start of your 2nd paragraph. "What that means is that the power peak arrives at some engine speed lower that."

    Second, your first statement would seem to imply that if they have an undersized turbo and over boosted, then you would have early death of the turbo charger. Is that what you are implying?

    So then if we go with your line of thought, the performance version at 197hp and 221lb-ft of torque would be a bigger turbo charger, but still undersized and over boosted and this would lead one to think that GM is planning on having these things die by 100,000 miles.

    With GM working so hard to change a persons mind, I have a hard time believing they would do this.

    Actually, that is exactly what I meant. If you any engine is making 206 lb-ft of maximum torque but only 168 hp, the power peak will have to be pretty low in rev range. Horsepower (by definition) = torque x rpm / 5252. If you are making 206 hp at 5252 rpm, you maximum horsepower would be 206 hp @ 5252 rpm. Given that the engine makes "only" 168 hp, it means that torque had fallen off significantly before 5252 rpm. With a flat torque curve -- like most turbo engines have -- 206 lb-ft @ 4300 rpm = 168hp at 4300 rpm. At any rpm above that torque MUST fall off faster than rpm rises otherwise the HP figure will exceed 168hp. At 6000 rpm for instance, torque must have fallen to no more than 147 hp. Otherwise hp will exceed 168 hp.

    Now, when I say the turbo is "undersized" I don't mean that it is being overworked and runs ]at damaging speeds shortening it's life. What I meant was simply that the turbo is incapable sustaining maximum boost all the way to the engine's redline. We generally call this an "undersized" setup, whereas a turbo which is capable of sustaining maximum boost beyond the engine's redline or a higher boost than stock is considered "oversized"

    This is also the reason why torque on must start falling off from 206 lb-ft no later than 4300 rpm. Because beyond that speed, one of two things (or both) must be happening. Either the turbo is exceeding its maximum rated rpm or it is falling of the compressor's efficiency map, and the ECU must progressive reduce boost above that engine speed so the turbo doesn't become short lived or make more heat than it does pressure which does nothing to get you more power. If this is not the case the engine would continue to make it's maximum torque (which collerates roughly with maximum boost) to a higher rpm and generate a higher hp figure than 168hp.

    Personally, I favor designs which have slightly lower torque than hp. This allows lower boost, higher compression which translates to both better fuel efficiency and a more responsive, more linear, engine. Examples of these will be the ATS 2.0T's 270hp / 262 lb-ft (LTG) engine or the Nissan GT-R's 520hp / 451 lb-ft (VR38DETT) engine.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    The 197 hp version of the engine should replace the 2.5 in the ATS.

    Personally, I'd favor a detuned 2.0L DI turbo for the ATS rated at about 210hp.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By Drew Dowdell
      Buick's compact convertible, the Buick Cascada, won't be returning for 2020.  Buick has informed dealers that final orders for the car need to be in by the end of the month as production of the car is scheduled to end in the summer. The Cascada is produced by GM's former Opel division, now owned by PSA, in Poland.
      The Cascada was Buick's first convertible since the the Buick Reatta.  Approximately 17,000 have been sold since the car went on sale in 2016.
      The discontinuation of the Cascada, along with the pending departure of the LaCrosse, mark Buick's slow creep towards being an all-crossover brand.

      View full article
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Buick's compact convertible, the Buick Cascada, won't be returning for 2020.  Buick has informed dealers that final orders for the car need to be in by the end of the month as production of the car is scheduled to end in the summer. The Cascada is produced by GM's former Opel division, now owned by PSA, in Poland.
      The Cascada was Buick's first convertible since the the Buick Reatta.  Approximately 17,000 have been sold since the car went on sale in 2016.
      The discontinuation of the Cascada, along with the pending departure of the LaCrosse, mark Buick's slow creep towards being an all-crossover brand.
    • By William Maley
      Opel is undergoing a major product overhaul as it begins to transition over from General Motors architectures to PSA Group. Some products will not make the change, however.
      Yesterday, Opel announced that the Adam city car, Cascada convertible, and the KARL city car will end production at the end of 2019. The company blames new emission rules for the canceling of these models, but some suspect the low-margin on these vehicles is what ultimately led to their demise.
      "In order to contribute to the CO2 compliance and to focus on high volume segments, the Opel ADAM, KARL and Cascada will not be replaced after the end of their life cycles, but will remain on sale until the end of 2019," the company said in a statement.
      This announcement has some wondering about the future of Buick's Cascada. A spokesman for the brand told Automotive News that Buick "not confirming anything at this point" regarding the brand's plans for the Cascada. Although, AN's Future Product Pipeline reports that the Buick version could be discontinued sooner than later.
      On the flipside, Opel will be launching eight all-new or refreshed vehicles beginning early next year. This will include a new Corsa subcompact and replacement for the Mokka X (what we know as the Buick Encore).
      Source: Reuters, Automotive News (Subscription Required), Opel


      Opel to Launch Eight All-New or Refreshed Models by 2020
      Stronger customer orientation and dealer performance Focus on high volume and high growth segments with three key launches by 2020: all-new Corsa, Vivaro and Mokka X successor Ensure CO2 compliance with state-of-the-art technology: four electrified vehicles by end of 2020; 100 percent electrification by 2024; further improved combustion engines Rüsselsheim.  Opel is continuing to execute the PACE! plan product offensive to meet customer needs and ensure compliance with the drastic Europe-wide CO2 guidelines which become effective in 2020. The future portfolio will ensure a sustainable, successful future for both the company and its dealer network. From early 2019 to the end of 2020, the company will launch eight all-new or refreshed models, investing primarily in high-volume and profitable segments. By then, Opel will be offering one of the newest portfolios of all volume manufacturers.
      With its PACE! plan, Opel has clearly committed to bringing at least one all-new model onto the market every year. In 2019 alone, Opel will launch the new generation of the bestselling Corsa and the successor to the successful Vivaro as LCV and passenger car variants. Additional variants and equipment versions of the Combo will also be on sale, thus significantly renewing the LCV portfolio. The successor to the hugely popular Opel Mokka X will follow in 2020 and will play a pivotal role for the strategy to expand the proportion of the company’s SUV sales from 25 to 40 percent by 2021.
      “Opel goes electric” was one of the commitments made by the company in November 2017 as part of its PACE! plan. Order books for both the all-electric new five-seater Corsa and the Grandland X PHEV which will be produced in Eisenach will be open by the summer of 2019. By the end of 2020, Opel will have a total of four electrified models on offer, providing a lot of driving pleasure and transforming e-car demand from niche to volume. By 2024, there will be an electrified version of every Opel model. Opel will make highly interesting offers, both technically and economically, and will democratise electro-mobility while further improving its combustion engines.
      In order to contribute to the CO2 compliance and to focus on high volume segments, the Opel ADAM, KARL and Cascada will not be replaced after the end of their life cycles, but will remain on sale until the end of 2019. With the new portfolio, Opel will continue to cover around 80 percent of the mainstream market volume in 2020 – with significantly higher efficiency and customer-orientation while simultaneously reducing complexity.
      “In a context of drastic CO2 norms, it’s our responsibility to shape a sustainable future for our company and our dealers with a highly competitive portfolio for passenger and light commercial vehicles. Opel will offer fun to drive and emotionally designed models including highly competitive light commercial vehicles such as the new Combo and Vivaro. The customers will benefit from the broad introduction of innovative technologies and affordable electrification,” said Opel CEO Michael Lohscheller. “The most recent awards – like the IVOTY 2019 for our Combo – demonstrate that we are on the right path.”
      The German manufacturer with almost 120 years of automotive tradition is leveraging Groupe PSA platforms and innovative propulsion technologies for all new models. Opel has impressively demonstrated its efficiency this year: the entire portfolio was and is fully available from dealers in time for the transition to the new Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure standard (WLTP). Moreover, Opel is already fully ready for the new Euro 6d-TEMP emissions standard and offers 127 passenger car models that meet the requirements which will come into effect for all new registrations in September 2019. “Our commitment to Euro 6d-TEMP is part of our strategy to become a leader in the reduction of vehicle emissions and a key pillar of our customer-centric approach. Whoever buys a new Opel now must not fear a city driving ban from today’s perspective,” said Lohscheller.

      View full article
  • Social Stream

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Cadillacfan
      Cadillacfan
      (34 years old)
  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • My Clubs

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...