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    The Move Is Official: Toyota Heads To Texas


    • Toyota Heads To Texas


    This morning, we reported on the rumor that Toyota was planning to its North American headquarters from California to Texas. Well this afternoon, the company has made it official. In a statement, Toyota announced that it will be moving from Torrance, California to Plano, Texas. The move will take about three years and affect around 4,000 people. Those 4,000 people include,

    • 2,000 from Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. Headquarters in Torrance, CA
    • 1,000 from Toyota Financial Services in Torrance, CA
    • 1,000 from Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America in Erlanger, KY
    • Some employees of Toyota Motor North America based in New York

    "With our major North American business affiliates and leaders together in one location for the first time, we will be better equipped to speed decision making, share best practices, and leverage the combined strength of our employees. This, in turn, will strengthen our ability to put customers first and to continue making great products that exceed their expectations. Ultimately, enabling greater collaboration and efficiencies across Toyota will help us become a more dynamic, innovative and successful organization in North America. This is the most significant change we’ve made to our North American operations in the past 50 years, and we are excited for what the future holds,” said Jim Lentz, Toyota North America CEO.

    As part of the plans, Toyota will offer all their full-time employees and their spouses an expenses-paid site visit to Plano, and a relocation payment if they decide to move.

    No word on how many of Toyota's current employees plan to move to Texas.

    Source: Toyota, Automotive News (Subscription Required), Wards Auto

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Press Release is on Page 2


    Toyota to Establish New North American Headquarters

    • Manufacturing, Sales and Marketing, Corporate and Financial Services Headquarters to Unify in New, Shared Campus in Plano, Texas
    • Toyota Technical Center in Michigan to Expand as Part of Increased Investment in Engineering Capabilities

    Torrance, Calif., Erlanger, Ky., New York, N.Y., and Ann Arbor, Mich., April 28, 2014 –Toyota today announced that it is establishing a new headquarters in North Dallas (Plano), Texas for its North American operations in a move designed to better serve customers and position Toyota for sustainable, long-term growth.

    Within the next three years, Toyota’s three separate North American headquarters for manufacturing, sales and marketing, and corporate operations will relocate to a single, state-of-the-art campus in Plano. Toyota’s North American finance arm also plans to move its headquarters to this new shared campus. Altogether, these moves will affect approximately 4,000 employees.

    At the same time, Toyota will expand the Toyota Technical Center (TTC) in Michigan to accommodate the relocation of direct procurement from Erlanger, Ky., to its campus in York Township near Ann Arbor. This expansion is part of an increased investment in engineering capabilities and will accommodate future growth in product development.

    The transition to Plano from three current headquarters locations – affecting approximately 2,000 employees at Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. (TMS) in Torrance, Calif.; about 1,000 employees at Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (TEMA) in Erlanger, Ky.; and certain employees at Toyota Motor North America (TMA) in New York, N.Y. – will begin with initial small groups this summer. However, the majority of these employees will not move until construction of Toyota’s new headquarters is completed in late 2016 or early 2017. Toyota Financial Services (TFS) is not expected to transition to Plano from its current headquarters in Torrance, Calif., until 2017, which will affect around 1,000 employees.

    Jim Lentz, who was named Toyota’s first chief executive officer for the North America Region in 2013, said: “With our major North American business affiliates and leaders together in one location for the first time, we will be better equipped to speed decision making, share best practices, and leverage the combined strength of our employees. This, in turn, will strengthen our ability to put customers first and to continue making great products that exceed their expectations. Ultimately, enabling greater collaboration and efficiencies across Toyota will help us become a more dynamic, innovative and successful organization in North America. This is the most significant change we’ve made to our North American operations in the past 50 years, and we are excited for what the future holds.”

    In support of the communities in California and Kentucky, Toyota also announced a $10 million philanthropic commitment to provide continued funding for local non-profits and community organizations in these states over a five-year period beginning in 2017, over and above existing commitments.

    The establishment of a new headquarters builds upon previous efforts by Toyota to enhance regional autonomy, self-reliance and responsibility. While the sales and marketing, manufacturing and corporate business units will retain their responsibilities and operating names, Toyota expects that new cross-functional teams will identify and execute on ways to serve the broader North American organization.

    Toyota will construct a new, environmentally-sustainable campus facility in Plano, which is expected to take two or more years to construct after groundbreaking in the fall of 2014. Until the new campus facility is complete, initial small groups of employees will work from a temporary location in the Plano area.

    Toyota will also build a new facility on TTC’s York campus (subject to final approval of state and local incentives) to accommodate approximately 250 direct procurement positions currently based at TEMA in Erlanger.

    In addition, about 300 production engineering positions based in Erlanger will be relocated to a new facility to be built at Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky (TMMK) in Georgetown, Ky., while approximately 1,000 TEMA administrative positions will transition to Plano.

    Toyota’s 10 manufacturing plants in the U.S. will not be impacted by these changes. Also, the following Toyota units will not be impacted at this time:

    • Toyota regional field offices and Lexus area offices
    • Operating units in Canada, Mexico and Puerto Rico
    • Toyota Financial Service’s regional offices, sales offices, service centers and its bank
    • Calty Design Research facilities
    • Toyota InfoTechnology Center
    • Toyota Racing Development
    • AirFlite Inc.
    • Logistics Services Field Locations
    • Distribution centers

    After moving from its existing headquarters, Toyota will continue to have approximately 2,300 employees in California and 8,200 employees in Kentucky. This includes 750 new jobs being added at TMMK for production of the Lexus ES, which begins in 2015. Toyota will also continue to maintain offices in the New York City area and Washington, DC.

    The move will not impact Toyota’s relationship with Gulf States Toyota, Inc. (GST), a private distributor of Toyota vehicles based in Houston, Texas.

    Toyota Financial Services (TFS) is a service mark used to refer to a number of entities, including Toyota Motor Credit Corporation (TMCC), Toyota Financial Savings Bank (TFSB), and Toyota Motor Insurance Services, Inc. (TMIS).

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    I would say 33% will go for sure, another 33% will not and the others will be a mixed bag of some going some staying.

    I moved to Texas and after a year of racist hate against my Korean wife and kids I left. Texas can burn for ever before I ever go back to that lousy place. Worst decision Toyota could ever do. It will be a mistake for them.

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    I would say 33% will go for sure, another 33% will not and the others will be a mixed bag of some going some staying.

    I moved to Texas and after a year of racist hate against my Korean wife and kids I left. Texas can burn for ever before I ever go back to that lousy place. Worst decision Toyota could ever do. It will be a mistake for them.

    I would say 33% will go for sure, another 33% will not and the others will be a mixed bag of some going some staying.

    I moved to Texas and after a year of racist hate against my Korean wife and kids I left. Texas can burn for ever before I ever go back to that lousy place. Worst decision Toyota could ever do. It will be a mistake for them.

    Where in Texas, if I may ask?

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    I would say 33% will go for sure, another 33% will not and the others will be a mixed bag of some going some staying.

    I moved to Texas and after a year of racist hate against my Korean wife and kids I left. Texas can burn for ever before I ever go back to that lousy place. Worst decision Toyota could ever do. It will be a mistake for them.

    I would say 33% will go for sure, another 33% will not and the others will be a mixed bag of some going some staying.

    I moved to Texas and after a year of racist hate against my Korean wife and kids I left. Texas can burn for ever before I ever go back to that lousy place. Worst decision Toyota could ever do. It will be a mistake for them.

    Where in Texas, if I may ask?

    Plano, Texas

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    I lived in Flower Mound Texas just north of DFW. Loved the house and the new community that we moved into and visiting the mid city area was fine, but Dallas especially North Dallas and the galleria was a nightmare.

    I filed a complaint with Nordstroms as my wife and kids walked in and no one greated them, no one offered to help and this was the second time she had been in that same day as I was working when she called about rude people not willing to help her with back to school shopping.

    Being born and raised in Seattle, I know what Nordstrom's service should be and I was not willing to accept what I saw especially after I walked through the door and had 3 people offer to help me just cause I am white.

    Same thing in down town Flower Mound. On one end of the city is a barber and I took my son there. Walked in and the place was filed with black men and I was told they do not cut my son's kind of hair and I would have to try the other barber. So I went to the other place all filled with white men and they told me the same thing. Ended up driving south and finally finding a place to get his hair cut.

    Texas self Segregates and then bullies everyone. The state was nice to visit when it was clear I was a tourist and they want your money you have to spend but living there was a nightmare and I could never recommend anyone move to Texas.

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    Over 4,000 employees, some percentage of which are LGBT, moving from states where their marriages are recognized to a state where those marriages are banned.

    there is going to be some culture shock.

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    Lived in DFW for 4 years now, and while I am white, I'm always on the lookout for the kinds of shenanigans that dfelt described. While there's the occasional story about dirty/racist cops (mainly Dallas and Fort Worth depts) and the ugly neighborhoods (pointing racism in every which direction, specifically), it's no worse than Northern California, where I grew up. That kind of stuff happens everywhere in this country, in pockets. Heck, I'm sure it's a worldwide phenomenon. I work with, and live near, people of every race, creed, and color...no problems.

    Plano is a fine place for any company to set up shop...even if it is Toyota ;)

    EDIT: I should add that I live in a semi-rural part of Fort Worth, where you might expect some degree of that kind of B.S. based on certain stereotypes of the South in general...nada. Plano is a much younger part of the metroplex.

    Should also note that Dallas proper is basically L.A. East in a great many ways. Not surprised you'd fine pockets of racial ugliness over there.

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      Value:
       
      Both of these test trucks make a strong case for going with one of the lower trims. The 2016 Toyota Tacoma Limited Double Cab starts at $37,820 for the four-wheel drive model. With options, the as-tested price came to $41,024. Yes, you do get a lot of standard equipment such as blind-spot monitoring, dual-zone climate control, navigation, heated seats, push-button start, and a JBL audio system. But you can get a fair amount of those features as options on the SR5 and the two TRD models. One other thing to consider. The Toyota Tacoma is one of the best vehicles to retain its resale value. Kelly Blue Book says the Tacoma will retain 73 percent of its resale value after three years.
       
      The Canyon SLT has a slightly lower base price of $37,450. But it is the more expensive of the two with an as-tested price of $44,365. A fair chunk of the price comes from Duramax diesel which will set you back $3,730. For the as-tested price, you can get into a decently equipped full-size truck. Again, the lower trim SLE gets most of the equipment from the SLT as options for a slightly lower price.
       
      Final Thoughts:
       
      If you’re expecting me to say the GMC Canyon is better than the Toyota Tacoma or vice-versa, then you’ll be surprised at what I’m going to say. Both of these trucks are good choices in the midsize truck class. The choice comes down to what are your desires and needs. For example, if you’re coming from passenger sedan into your first truck or planning to do some towing, the GMC Canyon and sister Chevrolet Colorado are what you should go for. On the opposite end, the Tacoma is perfect for those who want something to tackle the trail or need a V6 with a bit of punch.
       
      2016 GMC Canyon SLT Crew Cab
      Cheers: Fuel economy of the diesel, barely any wind and road noise, smooth ride
      Jeers: Price, GMC Intellilink still has some bugs, fair amount of turbo lag
       

      Album: Review: 2016 GMC Canyon SLT Crew Cab Diesel
      11 images 0 comments
       
      2016 Toyota Tacoma Limited Double Cab
      Cheers: Very capable off-road, V6 feels quite punchy, clever features in the bed
      Jeers: Rides like an old school truck, difficult to find a comfortable seating position, fair amount of road and wind noise
       

      Album: Review: 2016 Toyota Tacoma Limited Double Cab
      10 images 0 comments
       
      Disclaimer: GMC and Toyota Provided the trucks, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
       
      Year: 2016
      Make: GMC
      Model: Canyon
      Trim: SLT 4WD Crew Cab Short Box
      Engine: 2.8L Turbodiesel Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 181 @ 3,400
      Torque @ RPM: 369 @ 2,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/29/23
      Curb Weight: 4,698 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Wentzville, MO
      Base Price: $37,450
      As Tested Price: $44,365 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)
       
      Options:
      2.8L Duramax Turbodiesel Four - $3,730
      Bose Audio System - $500.00
      8" Color Touchscreen with GMC Intellilink and Navigation - $495.00
      Spray-On Bed Liner - $475.00
      Copper Red Metallic Pain - $395.00
      Driver Alert Package - $395.00
       
      Year: 2016
      Make: Toyota
      Model: Tacoma
      Trim: Limited 4X4 Double Cab
      Engine: 3.5L Atkinson Cycle V6 with Dual VVT-i
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 278 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 265 @ 4,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/23/20
      Curb Weight: 4,480 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX
      Base Price: $37,820
      As Tested Price: $41,024 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge)
       
      Options:
      Tonneau Cover - $650.00
      V6 Tow Package - $650.00
      5" Chrome Oval Tube Step - $535.00
      Carpet Floor Mats w/Door Sill - $209.00
      Mudgaurds - $140.00
      Bed Mat - $120.00


      Click here to view the article
    • By William Maley
      It seemed for a time that the midsize truck was a dead vehicle driving. If you wanted one a few years back, you only had the choice of the Nissan Frontier and Toyota Tacoma. All of the other midsize trucks had disappeared due to pricing and fuel economy figures being very close to full-size trucks, causing many buyers to go with the larger option. But the midsize truck has been enjoying a resurgence thanks to General Motors introducing the latest versions of the Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon into the U.S. This, in turn, has caused automakers to reconsider this class with Toyota introducing a ‘redesigned’ Tacoma last year and news coming out that Ford readying a new Ranger towards the end of this decade. GM hasn’t been resting on their laurels either. Last year saw them introduce a diesel engine that gives the Colorado and Canyon best-in-class towing numbers.
       
      A check-up in the midsize truck class was needed. Over the past few months, we spent some time in the 2016 Toyota Tacoma and GMC Canyon with the diesel option. Here is what we found out.
       
      Exterior:
       
      First up is the Toyota Tacoma which doesn’t look that much different from the previous model we drove back in 2013. The design brief for the 2016 model must have something to the effect of ‘if it ain’t broke, why fix it’ in terms of the overall shape. But that isn’t to say Toyota hasn’t made some changes to the design. The front end gets a larger grille, new headlights, and a more aggressive front bumper. Around the back, the tailgate has the ‘Tacoma’ name embossed.
       



      The GMC Canyon takes some ideas from the full-size Sierra in design. The front features a large chrome grille and rectangular headlights with LED daytime running lights. Our truck came fitted with a set of 18-inch wheels finished in what GM calls ‘ultra-bright chrome’. The rest of the truck is similar to Colorado in terms of the cab and bed design. I have to admit I prefer the Colorado over the Canyon in terms of design. The Colorado just stands out slightly more due to its more distinctive front end. 
      In terms of beds, both trucks came with their short bed option - measuring about 5 feet. Those needing a bigger bed can option a 6-foot on both trucks. But it should be noted that the Tacoma Limited only comes with the 5-foot bed option. If you want the longer bed, you’ll need to drop down to one of the lower trims. As for bed features, both trucks feature a dampened tailgate and adjustable tie-downs on the bed rails. But the Tacoma begins to pull ahead as it features tie-downs integrated into the floor, storage compartments, and the option of a 120V/400W outlet.
       
      Interior:
       
      Like their full-size brethren, midsize trucks have been seeing a noticeable increase in terms of interior design and materials. Sitting in either truck, you’ll be impressed with the amount of soft-touch materials and the small design touches throughout the interior. Between the two trucks, we would say the Tacoma is the sharper looking with dash inserts that match the color of the seats and silver trim running around various parts. As for the dash layout, both trucks feature a simple layout with controls within easy reach.
       



      In terms of seating, the Canyon and Tacoma offer seating up to five. But the Canyon is the most comfortable of the two trucks. The front seats provide the right balance of comfort and support. For 2016, GM has added a height adjustment for the power seats. This little addition makes finding a comfortable position that much easier. As for the back, there is a decent amount of headroom. Legroom varies on how tall the passenger sitting up front is. It ranges from decent to nonexistent. 
      The Tacoma, on the other hand, is a comedy of errors. First off, the front seats are mounted quite low and cause you to think that you’re sitting in a bunker. This wouldn’t be an issue if you could adjust the height, but the Tacoma doesn’t offer that. Making matters worse is the tilt and telescoping steering doesn’t offer enough range in terms of its adjustments. As I wrote my notes about the Tacoma, “instead of the truck fitting around you, you have to fit around it.” The back seat is best reserved for either small kids or cargo. An average size adult like your’s truly will find barely any head and legroom.
       
      Infotainment:
       
      The base Canyon SL and Canyon get a 4.2-inch color screen radio, while SLE and SLT trims get an 8-inch IntelliLink system. Our Canyon SLT tester featured the optional 8-inch IntelliLink system with navigation. General Motors has been improving IntelliLink/MyLink over the past few years in terms of overall stability. The system still stumbles in terms of performance and recognizing various devices plugged into the USB inputs. For 2016, GM has added Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capability. We tried out CarPlay in the Canyon and found it to be slightly better than IntelliLink in terms of the iPhone-like interface and snappy performance. But like in previous GM models with CarPlay, we found various applications would crash and the system wouldn’t always see my iPhone. Since driving the Canyon, we have tried out CarPlay in vehicles other manufacturers and didn’t have any issues.
       
      All Tacomas feature Toyota’s Entune infotainment system. Depending on the trim, the screen will measure either 6.1 or 7-inches. Our Tacoma Limited tester came with the 7-inch screen. Entune might not be newest-looking infotainment systems on the block, but its simple interface and fast response times make it one of the better systems on sale. We also like how you can customize the home screen to provide various information such as audio and navigation. At the moment, Toyota hasn’t added Apple CarPlay or Android Auto to Entune.
       
      Powertrain:
       
      The GMC Canyon is the most well-rounded when it comes to powertrains. There is a 2.5L inline-four, a 3.6L V6, and the engine found in our tester, a 2.8L Duramax Turbodiesel four-cylinder. The diesel produces 181 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and either two-wheel or four-wheel drive. When leaving a stop, you’ll find yourself wondering where that turbodiesel thrust is. Turbo lag is very apparent with this engine. Once the turbo does spool up, the engine delivers power at a smooth and immediate rate. The six-speed automatic provides quick gear changes. In terms of towing, GMC says the Canyon diesel with four-wheel drive can tow up to 7,600 pounds.
       



      For the Toyota Tacoma, you can choose from a 2.7L four-cylinder or a 3.5L V6. We had the V6 in our tester which boasted 278 horsepower and 265 pound-feet of torque. The V6 can be paired with a six-speed manual or automatic, and either two or four-wheel drive. Our truck came with the automatic and four-wheel drive. On paper, the Tacoma trails the Canyon’s V6 (305 horsepower and 269 pound-feet of torque). Out in the world, the Tacoma surpasses GM’s V6 partly due to it feeling more grunty at low rpms. You don’t feel that you need to give the Tacoma’s V6 more gas to get moving at a decent clip. The six-speed automatic delivers smooth gear changes, but we wished it would go through the gears quicker. Towing is rated at 6,400 lbs, about 600 pounds less than the Canyon with the V6. 
      Fuel Economy:
       
      The EPA rates the 2016 GMC Canyon four-wheel drive with the diesel at 20 City/29 Highway/23 Combined and the 2016 Toyota Tacoma V6 with four-wheel drive at 18 City/23 Highway/20 Combined. Our average for the week in both trucks were 25 MPG for the Canyon and 19.2 MPG for the Tacoma.
       
      Ride & Handling:
       
      No other midsize truck can come close to the GMC Canyon in terms of ride. Like the Chevrolet Colorado I drove last year, the Canyon’s suspension smooths over bumps and other road imperfections. You think that you’re riding in a sedan and not a truck. GM has done a lot of work in terms of sound-deadening for models equipped with the Duramax diesel. Thicker windows and more soundproofing means you’ll the clatter of the diesel engine when accelerating. The extra soundproofing also means the Canyon doesn’t have much wind and road noise coming inside.
       
      Contrast this with the Tacoma which feels more like a bucking bronco. You’ll able to tell how smooth or rough various roads are as the suspension will transmit a good amount of the surface into the seats due to the Tacoma retaining a solid-rear axle. Put a heavy load into the bed and the ride does smooth out. This is ok if you’re coming from an old pickup truck. Not so much if you’re coming from a sedan or crossover. Road and wind noise are very apparent at speeds above 45 mph.
       



      But the Tacoma does redeem itself when it comes to off-roading. Thanks to 9.4 inches of ground clearance, flexible suspension, and loads of off-road tech (hill start and descent control to name a couple), the Tacoma can tackle a trail with no issue. Thanks to winter storm during our week in the Tacoma, we were able to put the four-wheel drive system to the test. Fitted with a set of Michelin off-road tires, the Tacoma went through deep snow with no issues. It should be noted that if you’re serious about taking a Tacoma off-road, then you should look at the TRD Off-Road which adds new shocks, meatier off-road tires, the Multi-Terrain Select system that varies the traction control system for different conditions, and crawl control that modulates the brakes and engine when dealing with some treacherous obstacles such as a steep hill. 
      The Canyon isn’t as capable off-road. For one, it is about an inch shorter in terms of overall ground clearance. Second, the front air dam which is used to improve overall aerodynamics hampers off-road performance. A key example of this comes in approach angle. The Canyon only has an 18-degree approach angle while the Tacoma has either a 29 or 32-degree approach angle.
       
      Value:
       
      Both of these test trucks make a strong case for going with one of the lower trims. The 2016 Toyota Tacoma Limited Double Cab starts at $37,820 for the four-wheel drive model. With options, the as-tested price came to $41,024. Yes, you do get a lot of standard equipment such as blind-spot monitoring, dual-zone climate control, navigation, heated seats, push-button start, and a JBL audio system. But you can get a fair amount of those features as options on the SR5 and the two TRD models. One other thing to consider. The Toyota Tacoma is one of the best vehicles to retain its resale value. Kelly Blue Book says the Tacoma will retain 73 percent of its resale value after three years.
       
      The Canyon SLT has a slightly lower base price of $37,450. But it is the more expensive of the two with an as-tested price of $44,365. A fair chunk of the price comes from Duramax diesel which will set you back $3,730. For the as-tested price, you can get into a decently equipped full-size truck. Again, the lower trim SLE gets most of the equipment from the SLT as options for a slightly lower price.
       
      Final Thoughts:
       
      If you’re expecting me to say the GMC Canyon is better than the Toyota Tacoma or vice-versa, then you’ll be surprised at what I’m going to say. Both of these trucks are good choices in the midsize truck class. The choice comes down to what are your desires and needs. For example, if you’re coming from passenger sedan into your first truck or planning to do some towing, the GMC Canyon and sister Chevrolet Colorado are what you should go for. On the opposite end, the Tacoma is perfect for those who want something to tackle the trail or need a V6 with a bit of punch.
       
      2016 GMC Canyon SLT Crew Cab
      Cheers: Fuel economy of the diesel, barely any wind and road noise, smooth ride
      Jeers: Price, GMC Intellilink still has some bugs, fair amount of turbo lag
       

       
      2016 Toyota Tacoma Limited Double Cab
      Cheers: Very capable off-road, V6 feels quite punchy, clever features in the bed
      Jeers: Rides like an old school truck, difficult to find a comfortable seating position, fair amount of road and wind noise
       

       
      Disclaimer: GMC and Toyota Provided the trucks, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
       
      Year: 2016
      Make: GMC
      Model: Canyon
      Trim: SLT 4WD Crew Cab Short Box
      Engine: 2.8L Turbodiesel Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 181 @ 3,400
      Torque @ RPM: 369 @ 2,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/29/23
      Curb Weight: 4,698 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Wentzville, MO
      Base Price: $37,450
      As Tested Price: $44,365 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)
       
      Options:
      2.8L Duramax Turbodiesel Four - $3,730
      Bose Audio System - $500.00
      8" Color Touchscreen with GMC Intellilink and Navigation - $495.00
      Spray-On Bed Liner - $475.00
      Copper Red Metallic Pain - $395.00
      Driver Alert Package - $395.00
       
      Year: 2016
      Make: Toyota
      Model: Tacoma
      Trim: Limited 4X4 Double Cab
      Engine: 3.5L Atkinson Cycle V6 with Dual VVT-i
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 278 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 265 @ 4,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/23/20
      Curb Weight: 4,480 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX
      Base Price: $37,820
      As Tested Price: $41,024 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge)
       
      Options:
      Tonneau Cover - $650.00
      V6 Tow Package - $650.00
      5" Chrome Oval Tube Step - $535.00
      Carpet Floor Mats w/Door Sill - $209.00
      Mudgaurds - $140.00
      Bed Mat - $120.00
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