• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    As the Diesel Emits: A Former Volkswagen Employee Claims He Was Fired For Reporting Data Deletion


    • Did Volkswagen delete data after it was told not to? A new lawsuit alleges this.

    A new wrinkle has appeared in the Volkswagen diesel scandal. Last week, Daniel Donovan filed suit against Volkswagen of America for wrongful termination and breaking the Michigan Whistleblowers' Protection Act after reporting that the company continuing deleting data after the EPA said to stop.

     

    On September 18, the EPA filed a violation notice against Volkswagen's diesel vehicles. Part of that notice required Volkswagen to not delete any more data. Donovan alleges in the suit that workers at Volkswagen Group of America's data processing center in Auburn Hills, MI did not stop till September 21st. Donovan told his supervisor about this and tried to stop the deletions. A couple of months later, Donovan was fired.

     

    Donovan claims his firing was due to concerns Volkswagen of him reporting this to authorities.

     

    "The circumstances of Mr. Donovan's departure were unrelated to the diesel emissions issue. We believe his claim of wrongful termination is without merit," said Volkswagen in a statement to Autoblog.

     

    Unfortunately, we don't know what kind of data was deleted. But if these allegations are proven to be true, it doesn't matter what kind of data it was: Volkswagen violated the order and could be facing punishment for it.

     

    Source: Courthouse News Service, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Reuters, Autoblog

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    This is going to get far more uglier than VW knows. They are just shooting themselves in the foot over and over and the public will remember. I doubt VW will be more than half it's size before the scandal erupted in another year.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Lovely, I see that the Stockholders have now Sued Class Action ShareHolder lawsuit asking for minimum of 3.7 Billion for lost Value due to the deceit by the board and CEO.

     

    I wonder if VW will be forced to declare bankruptcy?

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. CARBIZ
      CARBIZ
      (56 years old)
    2. crash
      crash
      (29 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      With Volkswagen buying back a large chunk of the 2.0L TDIs involved the diesel emission scandal, the question arises of where to store them. The answer according to the German automaker is they are storing them at "regional facilities." One of those regional facilities is the parking lot of the Pontiac Silverdome - former home to the Detroit Lions - in Pontiac, MI. However, the vehicles stored there find themselves in a bit of legal trouble.
      The Oakland Press reports that the City of Pontiac has filed a lawsuit against the owners of Silverdome, the Triple Investment Group for numerous violations in zoning, safety, and a municipal code dealing with the storage of vehicles; "a special exemption permit is needed for parking and exterior storage of vehicles." A hearing was planned last week, but was adjourned.
      “Our client is actively engaged and working with the city. We hope to resolve our differences with the city and we believe we are making good progress and working together. We are still waiting on a schedule for (the hearing) but we are hopeful that we will resolve the differences in the meantime and further hearings won’t be necessary,” said J. Patrick Lennon, a partner at Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn, the lawfirm representing Triple Investment Group.
      A Volkswagen spokeswoman told Automotive News the company is talking with their “service provider” to see if all of the permits that allow vehicles to be stored at the Silverdome are up to date.
      Source: The Oakland Press, Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: WXYZ

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      With Volkswagen buying back a large chunk of the 2.0L TDIs involved the diesel emission scandal, the question arises of where to store them. The answer according to the German automaker is they are storing them at "regional facilities." One of those regional facilities is the parking lot of the Pontiac Silverdome - former home to the Detroit Lions - in Pontiac, MI. However, the vehicles stored there find themselves in a bit of legal trouble.
      The Oakland Press reports that the City of Pontiac has filed a lawsuit against the owners of Silverdome, the Triple Investment Group for numerous violations in zoning, safety, and a municipal code dealing with the storage of vehicles; "a special exemption permit is needed for parking and exterior storage of vehicles." A hearing was planned last week, but was adjourned.
      “Our client is actively engaged and working with the city. We hope to resolve our differences with the city and we believe we are making good progress and working together. We are still waiting on a schedule for (the hearing) but we are hopeful that we will resolve the differences in the meantime and further hearings won’t be necessary,” said J. Patrick Lennon, a partner at Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn, the lawfirm representing Triple Investment Group.
      A Volkswagen spokeswoman told Automotive News the company is talking with their “service provider” to see if all of the permits that allow vehicles to be stored at the Silverdome are up to date.
      Source: The Oakland Press, Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: WXYZ
    • By William Maley
      A group of Shelby GT350 owners are not happy with Ford.
      Yesterday, a lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida claiming that the track-ready GT350 isn't. According to filling, owners complain that the vehicle overheats in as little as 15 minutes due faulty transmissions and rear differentials when driven on a track. When the vehicle does overheat, it goes into a limp mode that reduces power to protect the powertrain. The filing goes on to say that Ford fixed this issue in the 2017 model, but told owners of the 2016 model to make the fixes themselves - a possible breach of the car's warranty.
      “When Ford marketed and sold these Shelby GT350 Mustangs, it knew exactly how to appeal to track-enthusiasts: it marketed enhanced performance in a limited-edition iconic vehicle that has been associated with racing for generations,” said Steve Berman, managing partner of Hagens Berman, the law firm handling the case.
      “We believe that Ford induced purchasers with its ‘track-ready’ marketing, when in fact it knew that this defect would ultimately bar these Mustangs from ever being the hotrod consumers paid for.”
      At the moment, the lawsuit has four named plaintiffs. Hagens Berman estimates about 4,000 owners are affected by this issue. 
      “Ford is committed to providing our customers with top-quality vehicles. However, we do not comment on pending litigation,” said Ford spokesman Bradley Carroll to The Detroit News.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), The Detroit News

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)