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    William Maley

    Quick Drive: 2014 Cadillac XTS VSport Premium

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      The XTS, Now With Turbo

    One of my favorite vehicles I drove last year was the 2013 Cadillac XTS. I loved the looks, luxury appointments, and the ride characteristics of the big sedan. What I wasn’t too keen on was the 3.6L DI V6. As I said in my review, the 3.6 had to be worked to get it moving. Not something that is very characteristic of a big Cadillac sedan. Well the brand has introduced a new variant of the XTS called the XTS VSport with a new turbocharged V6 engine. Is the fix that the XTS needed?

    The turbocharged V6 in question is the 3.6L Twin-Turbo V6 from the CTS VSport. For the XTS VSport, it has been slightly detuned from 420 horsepower and 430 pound-feet to 410 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque. This is paired to an six-speed automatic transmission and all-wheel drive system. The engine makes a massive difference in how the XTS drives. Instead of working the throttle to get the XTS moving at a somewhat decent clip, the TT 3.6 is able to get this 4,200 pound vehicle moving at a fast clip with no problem at all. Power is seemingly available throughout the rev range. So no matter whether you are leaving a stop or making a pass, power is right there.

    That isn’t the only change made the XTS VSport. Cadillac also retuned the XTS’ suspension to give it a more sporting character. Down on one of the roads I use for evaluation, I noticed that the VSport does minimize the amount of body roll that was on the standard XTS. But don’t expect much more than that. Steering has a little more heft, but no more feel than the standard model. For most buyers of the XTS VSport, this won’t be a big deal.

    Besides the new engine, the VSport is mostly the same as the standard XTS. The key items on the exterior that show its true nature aside from the V badge on the trunk is a new front clip and a set of nineteen-inch wheels.

    Our XTS VSport tester rings at $65,415 and for the improvement of the TT 3.6 V6, it's worth it.

    Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XTS VSport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Cadillac

    Model: XTS

    Trim: VSport Premium

    Engine: 3.6L V6 Twin-Turbo VVT DI

    Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive

    Horsepower @ RPM: 410 @ 6000

    Torque @ RPM: 369 @ 1900-5600

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19

    Curb Weight: 4,215 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Oshawa, Ontario

    Base Price: $62,095

    As Tested Price: $65,415 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Driver Assist Package - $2,395.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Nice Write up. This makes me wonder if I can get the other coding of the chips so that I can gain back my HP and Torque in this car. That would be a great upgrade. Get the Full power of this via a chip tuner device.

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    It may have been de-tuned so as not to overload the AWD system and not have too much torque steer at the front wheels.

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    I thought the AWD system was the same between the CTS and XTS. Anyone know if this is true?

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    It may have been de-tuned so as not to overload the AWD system and not have too much torque steer at the front wheels.

     

    In the XTS, it was detuned because the engine is turned 90 degrees and there is an exhaust restriction.... it's only 10 HP.  The Halex system can send something like 90% of the torque to the rear if need be, so I doubt it has anything to do with torque steer.

     

    I thought the AWD system was the same between the CTS and XTS. Anyone know if this is true?

     

    The CTS V-Sport is RWD only... though in the AWD models with lesser engines, it would be a different transmission and AWD system.

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    It may have been de-tuned so as not to overload the AWD system and not have too much torque steer at the front wheels.

     

    In the XTS, it was detuned because the engine is turned 90 degrees and there is an exhaust restriction.... it's only 10 HP.  The Halex system can send something like 90% of the torque to the rear if need be, so I doubt it has anything to do with torque steer.

     

    I thought the AWD system was the same between the CTS and XTS. Anyone know if this is true?

     

    The CTS V-Sport is RWD only... though in the AWD models with lesser engines, it would be a different transmission and AWD system.

     

    Much appreciate the clarification Drew. Thank you

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    I don't get why anyone would buy this over a CTS V-sport?  If you want performance you are going to want the CTS, if you don't want performance and like the XTS then 300 hp is probably plenty for that type of buyer.   I bet these will be a rare breed.

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    They could just make AWD optional on the CTS V-sport, they could make it optional on the CTS-V even.  But I supposed they have to justify the XTS's existence some how.

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    CTS-V Sport & XTS-V Sport are 2 different vehicles; individual preference is given 2 choices here. No mystery.

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    I don't get why anyone would buy this over a CTS V-sport?  If you want performance you are going to want the CTS, if you don't want performance and like the XTS then 300 hp is probably plenty for that type of buyer.   I bet these will be a rare breed.

    Room, comfort and trunk space come directly to mind. The CTS is a bit cramped inside, especially the back seat.

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    I don't get why anyone would buy this over a CTS V-sport?  If you want performance you are going to want the CTS, if you don't want performance and like the XTS then 300 hp is probably plenty for that type of buyer.   I bet these will be a rare breed.

    Room, comfort and trunk space come directly to mind. The CTS is a bit cramped inside, especially the back seat.

     

    Size and space all depends on the size of the people. On my wife's side which is Korean, both the CTS and XTS are huge and have plenty of space and then you have their size which for the family is on average 5' tall. Yet on my side of the family, the average person is 6' tall a foot taller and makes a big difference. Course  both auto's while nice are just too small for my 6'6" tall frame and I used to own a CTS. :P

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    My Father Loves the XTS also but he likes the soft float rides so there is a group who prefers these auto's still.

     

    I would never snub my nose at driving either one if given to me. :)

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    Best interior for the price and 32.2 mpg on multiple hour drives with Adaptive Cruise Control set at 65 mph....with AWD! I can't say enough how nice it is to drive this can I bought used used XTS Vsport Platinum with 40,000+ miles on it. Not only does it drive nice but it turns heads at every corner.

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    It may have been de-tuned so as not to overload the AWD system and not have too much torque steer at the front wheels.

    The more likely culprit is the torque rating on the transaxle. You could chip one back to RWD specs, but you may wind up with shrapnel and red goo in your driveway after a while.

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    Nice Write up. This makes me wonder if I can get the other coding of the chips so that I can gain back my HP and Torque in this car. That would be a great upgrade. Get the Full power of this via a chip tuner device.

    You can get that back and then some. Tuning my 2014 XTs VSport Platinum with HPTuners we went from bthe stock 369 lb-ftb of torque to 530+! It is beast! It spins the front tires on kickbdown from 50-70 mph. And fuel economy is just as good stock with 32+ mpg at 65 mph.

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    I don't get why anyone would buy this over a CTS V-sport?  If you want performance you are going to want the CTS, if you don't want performance and like the XTS then 300 hp is probably plenty for that type of buyer.   I bet these will be a rare breed.

    The XTS VSport offers more of everything luxury that the CTS offers, plus a couple pound weight penalty. I think the Platinum XTS has even more like fully Opus leather wrap seats, leather on the doors and dash. It is a little heavy but the hydraulic steering(instead of electric) and AWD with torque vectoring makes the big beast claw in the turns. MRC shocks are peachy in the way they adjust. They can be a bit firm on rough roads but have no problem an keeping the tires planted over frost heaves and big cracks. Besides the great electronics including CUE, which I love, the looks are what no one second guesses.

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    It may have been de-tuned so as not to overload the AWD system and not have too much torque steer at the front wheels.

    The more likely culprit is the torque rating on the transaxle. You could chip one back to RWD specs, but you may wind up with shrapnel and red goo in your driveway after a while.

    Not sure why this got a downvote. I used to work for GM and I know that they pushed the torque ratings on their transaxles pretty hard.

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    I thought the AWD system was the same between the CTS and XTS. Anyone know if this is true?

     

     

    I believe it is, but U must keep in mind that the AWD system in the CTS is mated to the regular LFX engine with 320HP. That being said.. the NEW AWD system debuting in the CT6 would not have required a de-tuning of the engine as it is capable of handling up to 958 lbs of torque

    Edited by Cmicasa the Great

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    It may have been de-tuned so as not to overload the AWD system and not have too much torque steer at the front wheels.

    The more likely culprit is the torque rating on the transaxle. You could chip one back to RWD specs, but you may wind up with shrapnel and red goo in your driveway after a while.

    Not sure why this got a downvote. I used to work for GM and I know that they pushed the torque ratings on their transaxles pretty hard.

     

     

    Fixed.

     

    You are 100% correct. The XTS transmission is based on the 6T75, which itself was only rated for 300 lb-ft of torque. They were only able to upgrade the internals enough for the decreased tune they put on the 3.6T. I'm not sure I would feel comfortable tuning an XTS Vsport, it would almost certainly put unwelcome stress on the trans.

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    Ya, I suspect the drivelines are wildly different in both layout and specs. Anyone looking to chip an XTS should really look at beefing up the transaxle first IMO.

    Sure would be a nice driveline for an Impala in a year or two tho

    Edited by El Kabong

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    The XTS uses a haldex system, I don't believe the CTS uses that.

     

    I'm pretty sure haldex AWD is exclusive to FWD-based vehicles. The whole point of it is to simulate the performance advantages of RWD with torque vectoring.The CTS doesn't need it. Also, the CTS Vsport that shares the 3.6T engine doesn't currently offer AWD at all.

    Edited by cp-the-nerd

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    The XTS uses a haldex system, I don't believe the CTS uses that.

     

    I'm pretty sure haldex AWD is exclusive to FWD-based vehicles. The whole point of it is to simulate the performance advantages of RWD with torque vectoring.The CTS doesn't need it. Also, the CTS Vsport that shares the 3.6T engine doesn't currently offer AWD at all.

     

     

    I'm almost certain that you're right that Haldex is exclusive to FWD based vehicles.   But Haldex is a company name brand, they could conceivably produce AWD systems for RWD cars as well. 

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    The XTS uses a haldex system, I don't believe the CTS uses that.

    Haldex systems are for front drive, or at least AWD systems that normally run FWD.  There is an episode of Autoline after hours with one of the lead engineers at VW and he explained how the Haldex system works and that is what is on the VW models, and the Audi A3 and Q3.  On those cars it is like 90% front drive unless the wheels slip, he said the differentials would overheat if they ran rear drive, they can only do it for short periods.  The Audi A4/A6/A8 use a totally different system that runs more rear bias.  CTS has to use something different than haldex, something that can run 55% or more rear bias.

    Edited by smk4565

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    • I wonder if they will do a white OJ Edition of the 2dr.
    • Those are some expensive taxis; i-Paces start at $70 grand, then you have to retro fit the charging hardware. Oh well- just up everyone's taxi fares AND property taxes; probably no one will notice it costs $50 to take a 4-block taxi ride. Also not sure of the statement that 'each charge provides 6-8 minutes of energy' - doesn't the pad keep charging as long as the vehicle is over it? 6-8 mins is not much of anything.
    • Got it.  I remember you saying that before.  Tomatoes are rich in lycopene.  I like most things with tomatoes but, like your pizzas, I may like pesto even more. I also have a "no way" list:  anything spicy, eggplant, pecan pie, curry, and some types of shellfish are on that list. As for the ice cream with turkey in it, I haven't used the coupon yet (this weekend) and I've never had ice cream with tryptophan in it, so I'll let you know!
    • Some cool stuff out on the EV front. Whole new industry has started up as they have found they can Shred Li-Ion cells and recover the bulk of the materials to make new batteries. https://chargedevs.com/newswire/recovering-usable-battery-grade-materials-from-shredded-li-ion-cells-free-webcast/ Seems Oslo is moving ahead of the world to a clean transport mode for the taxis as they have gone to putting in Wireless charging pads so Taxi's never have to leave their lane while waiting for the next fare and get recharged all at the same time. This allows for a high speed wireless charge keeping the batteries at their optimal charged point. Oslo has choosen to go with Jaguar i-Pace as the taxi of choice for use in the city of Oslo. https://chargedevs.com/newswire/jaguar-i-pace-electric-taxis-charging-wirelessly-in-oslo/ Interesting details on a company that is improving how Auto OEMs can reduce start up costs on making battery packs. https://chargedevs.com/newswire/improving-ev-battery-manufacturing-production-costs/
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