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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Quick Drive: 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Blue

      Low cost and high fuel economy figures

    “Despite the positives, the Ioniq finds itself between a rock and hard place.”

    That was how I closed my review of the 2017 Hyundai Ioniq SEL earlier this year. Despite me finding a lot to like about this hybrid, I found myself struggling as determining whether it was better or worse than the Toyota Prius. A few weeks ago, another Ioniq arrived in my driveway for a weeklong evaluation. This particular variant is the base Blue model, which is positioned as the mileage champ in the Ioniq lineup. Maybe this model could sway me in one direction or the other.

    • EPA figures stand at 57 City/59 Highway/58 Combined, up 2/5/3 when compared to the Ioniq SEL I drove last year. My average for the week was an impressive 62 mpg - a huge increase over the 45 mpg in the last Ioniq I drove.
    • Why the massive difference in average fuel economy? It comes down to the weather. The Blue was driven in a week where the average temperature was around 80 degrees, whereas the SEL was driven in conditions where it was below freezing. The warmer temps allowed the vehicle to rely more on electric power only. I would estimate that 30 to 40 percent of the miles driven in the Ioniq was just on electric only.
    • The powertrain is unchanged in the Blue. There’s a 1.6L Atkinson Cycle four-cylinder engine, a 32 kW electric motor, and a Lithium-ion Polymer battery that produces a total output of 139 horsepower. This is paired with a six-speed dual-clutch transmission. I had no issues with keeping up with traffic as the powertrain delivered decent acceleration. The dual-clutch delivered smooth and quick shifts.
    • Handling is a strong point to the Ioniq as it delivers little body roll and responds quickly to steering inputs. Ride quality could be better as the Ioniq does let in more jolts than the Kia Niro or Toyota Prius.
    • Another area the Ioniq doesn’t fare so well in us noise isolation. There is a fair amount of tire roar that comes inside at speeds above 50 mph. 
    • Telling the Ioniq Blue apart from the other models is quite easy. The front end has a plain black grille and vents in the bumper where the LED foglights would reside. 15-inch wheels with aero wheel covers come standard.
    • Aside from some missing features such as power adjustments for the driver’s seat, the interior of the Ioniq Blue is the same as the SEL. That means a simple and clean dash design, a set of front seats that become a bit uncomfortable during long trips, and a tight back seat for tall passengers.
    • For being a base model, the Blue comes well equipped. There is a proximity key, push-button start, 7-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility; Bluetooth, dual-zone climate control, and automatic headlights.
    • How much? The Blue begins at $22,220, and my tester came to an as-tested price of $23,210 with destination and optional floor mats.
    • As my week with the Ioniq Blue came to a close, I came to the realization that I liked it slightly more than the Prius. A lot of it comes down to the Ioniq offering better performance while returning just as impressive fuel economy figures as the Prius I drove back in 2016. The high amount of features for a low price also favors the Ioniq.
    • I still do think the Ioniq is in a bit of tough spot due to the large appetite for crossovers. This is evident when you compare the sales of the Ioniq to its sister model, the Kia Niro. Through the end of July, the Niro outsold the Ioniq by 6,716 units.

    Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Ioniq, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2018
    Make: Hyundai
    Model: Ioniq
    Trim: Blue
    Engine: 1.6L GDI Atkinson-Cycle Four-Cylinder, Electric Motor, Lithium-ion Polymer Battery Pack
    Driveline: Six-Speed Dual-Clutch Transmission, Front-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 104 @ 5,700 (Gas); 43 @ 0 (Electric); 139 (Total)
    Torque @ RPM: 109 @ 4,000 (Gas); 125 @ 0 (Electric)
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 57/59/58
    Curb Weight: 2,996 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
    Base Price: $22,200
    As Tested Price: $23,210 (Includes $885.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    Carpeted Floor Mats - $125.00

     



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    Good write up, very interesting and for me it confirmed that this car falls in the same category of BLAH car as the Prius. Both have ugly dashes, exterior is that blah coupe design that is so tiring and right now is just barely better than the gas cars in mileage. 

    I would rather just have a pure electric over this.

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