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Oracle of Delphi

FUTURE PRODUCTS -- GENERAL MOTORS

21 posts in this topic

Jamie LaReau

Automotive News

August 25, 2008 - 12:01 am ET

High gasoline prices, tougher fuel economy regulations and limited product development funds are forcing Chevrolet to reinvent much of next decade's product line.

Gone are plans for a rear-drive Impala. In question are the big, once highly profitable SUVs, which may be replaced with smaller vehicles.

Waiting in the wings is the ballyhooed rear-drive Camaro, arriving in February.

On the horizon are a redesigned Aveo, the new Cruze economy sedan and the pure-electric Volt.

Several years away is a minicar with excellent fuel economy.

Aveo: The subcompact will be redesigned for the 2011 model year. The 2011 Aveo could draw design cues from the Chevrolet Groove or Trax minicar concepts shown at the 2007 New York auto show, but the Aveo will be longer and wider than the concepts to meet federal safety regulations.

GM Daewoo Auto & Technology Co. will develop the redesigned Aveo in South Korea with assistance from an international development team in Shanghai. The car will be developed on GM's global Gamma platform. The U.S. version likely will be built in GM's plant in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

Cruze: A Paris auto show unveiling is planned for the 2011 front-drive compact sedan, which will be sold globally. The car is being engineered by GM Daewoo. The Lordstown, Ohio, plant will assemble the North American version, with production beginning next year. The car is being developed on GM's new global Delta vehicle architecture.

GM's new 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine, which will power the Cruze, will be used globally in several brands. A turbocharged version is planned.

Cobalt: The Lordstown plant is scheduled to assemble the current generation of the compact through June 2010. After that, GM may keep a Cobalt coupe in production and shift assembly to Mexico.

Malibu: The scheduled restyling for the 2010 model year has been canceled because of cost constraints. Depending on the new fuel economy rules, the overall length and wheelbase of the next-generation Malibu might be trimmed. If so, the restyled and re-engineered car might debut for the 2012 model year.

Volt: GM's lithium ion battery technology will debut in the 2011 Volt, a fwd plug-in hybrid with its own styling. The automaker is following the pattern set by Toyota with the Prius, a separate model to highlight hybrid technology.

The Volt's battery-powered electric motor will be capable of propelling the vehicle about 40 miles before a gasoline engine kicks in to recharge the battery. The Volt will be built on GM's Delta architecture and assembled at the Detroit-Hamtramck plant. GM wants the Volt sedan to be on sale by the third week of November 2010.

Impala: The mid-sized car was scheduled to be redesigned as a rwd vehicle for the 2011 model year. But the high price of gasoline and stiffer U.S. fuel economy regulations have persuaded GM to leave the Impala fwd.

The new plan: The Impala will be redesigned for the 2012 model year on GM's new global mid-sized vehicle architecture, previously known as Epsilon. The new Impala is expected to be slightly wider and longer than the 2008 model, with possibly shorter front and rear overhangs.

Camaro: The 2010 coupe will go into production in February. The convertible might be pushed back to the 2012 model year because of cost constraints.

The Camaro was developed on GM's global rwd Zeta vehicle architecture, which was created by GM's Holden subsidiary in Australia. V-6 and V-8 engines will be offered. GM insiders say the turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine once mentioned by product chief Bob Lutz is likely too weak. GM will build the Camaro in Oshawa, Ontario.

Corvette: GM has launched its 200-mph-plus 2009 ZR-1, which starts at $105,000, including shipping and a gas-guzzler tax. The hand-built, 6.2-liter V-8 is rated at 638 hp. Chevrolet says the car accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 3.4 seconds and can achieve a top speed of 205 mph, making it the fastest Corvette ever made.

Production of the redesigned Corvette is to start in April 2012 for the 2013 model year. Despite talk of a midengine model, the front-engine layout will be maintained.

HHR: The redesigned 2011 wagon will abandon the retro styling theme and become what one insider called "radically modern." It also will be bigger, with possible seating for seven. Essentially, it will be a mini-minivan, based on the replacement for the Opel Zafira. The vehicles will be developed on GM's next-generation Delta vehicle architecture. A concept may be revealed this year.

Equinox: The 2010 crossover will be restyled and re-engineered. Those who have seen the new Equinox say it has lots of chrome, a new interior, larger wheels and a revised chassis.

Traverse: The 2009 Traverse is the fourth and final crossover developed on GM's mid-sized Lambda vehicle architecture. The Traverse will be assembled at GM's Spring Hill, Tenn., plant, which formerly was devoted to Saturn.

TrailBlazer: GM is phasing out its SUV, planning to replace it with the more fuel-efficient Traverse. The Moraine, Ohio, plant, which builds the TrailBlazer, is scheduled to close in 2010, but some speculate the factory might stop assembling the TrailBlazer sooner because of poor sales.

Tahoe, Suburban: The full-sized SUVs were scheduled to be restyled and re-engineered for the 2012 model year, but those plans are on hold. GM executives say high gasoline prices and stiffer fuel economy regulations may mean that the Tahoe and Suburban will be replaced by models developed on a stretched version of the Lambda platform.

Avalanche: A scheduled restyling and re-engineering of the SUV-based pickup for the 2012 model year is on hold. The Avalanche may switch to the Lambda platform.

Colorado: Will an optional 300-hp, 5.3-liter V-8 help the 2009 Colorado become a big player in the small-pickup segment? Chevrolet promises 0-to-60-mph acceleration in less than seven seconds for the V-8-powered version. The 2009 Colorado's brakes have been re-engineered.

A redesign is on hold pending an analysis of new fuel economy regulations. The redesign had been scheduled for the 2012 model year on GM's GMT700 vehicle platform.

Silverado 1500: GM launches its Two Mode hybrid Chevrolet and GMC pickups for the 2009 model year.

Silverado 2500, 3500: The re-engineering of the heavy-duty models has been pushed back, possibly to the 2011 model year.

Uplander: The slow-selling minivan eventually will be replaced by the new Traverse crossover, but GM will continue building the Uplander into 2009.

Express: No significant changes are expected.

Link: http://www.autonews.com/article/20080825/ANA03/808250307

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The Tahoe/Suburban replacements seem to be the only part I can't get with.

Everything else is cool, especially the Impala FINALLY being replaced by... something. Let's hope it gets AWD as an option.

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Aveo: The subcompact will be redesigned for the 2011 model year. The 2011 Aveo could draw design cues from the Chevrolet Groove or Trax minicar concepts shown at the 2007 New York auto show, but the Aveo will be longer and wider than the concepts to meet federal safety regulations.

It's about time.

Cobalt: The Lordstown plant is scheduled to assemble the current generation of the compact through June 2010. After that, GM may keep a Cobalt coupe in production and shift assembly to Mexico.
Oh, yay... An outdated coupe model.

Malibu: The scheduled restyling for the 2010 model year has been canceled because of cost constraints. Depending on the new fuel economy rules, the overall length and wheelbase of the next-generation Malibu might be trimmed. If so, the restyled and re-engineered car might debut for the 2012 model year.

Looks like Malibu will wither on the vine just like so many other good GM products before it.

Volt: GM's lithium ion battery technology will debut in the 2011 Volt, a fwd plug-in hybrid with its own styling. The automaker is following the pattern set by Toyota with the Prius, a separate model to highlight hybrid technology.
Apparently the only new model GM can work on.

Impala: The mid-sized car was scheduled to be redesigned as a rwd vehicle for the 2011 model year. But the high price of gasoline and stiffer U.S. fuel economy regulations have persuaded GM to leave the Impala fwd.

And what does layout have to do with CAFE again? Doesn't RWD (If it weren't cheap and heavy) benefit CAFE now.

The new plan: The Impala will be redesigned for the 2012 model year on GM's new global mid-sized vehicle architecture, previously known as Epsilon. The new Impala is expected to be slightly wider and longer than the 2008 model, with possibly shorter front and rear overhangs.

Oh, yay! Another FWD Invicta variant!

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Camaro: The 2010 coupe will go into production in February. The convertible might be pushed back to the 2012 model year because of cost constraints.
...Or never be produced. (TRANSLATION: If the Camaro doesn't sell well or if the greenies get pissed off, then the program will end, so the vert is on hold)

The Camaro was developed on GM's global rwd Zeta vehicle architecture, which was created by GM's Holden subsidiary in Australia. V-6 and V-8 engines will be offered. GM insiders say the turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine once mentioned by product chief Bob Lutz is likely too weak. GM will build the Camaro in Oshawa, Ontario.

Yet not too weak for the CTS?

Corvette: GM has launched its 200-mph-plus 2009 ZR-1, which starts at $105,000, including shipping and a gas-guzzler tax. The hand-built, 6.2-liter V-8 is rated at 638 hp. Chevrolet says the car accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 3.4 seconds and can achieve a top speed of 205 mph, making it the fastest Corvette ever made.
Have fun while it lasts...

Production of the redesigned Corvette is to start in April 2012 for the 2013 model year. Despite talk of a midengine model, the front-engine layout will be maintained.

Yay for a corporate 3.6L!!!!

HHR: The redesigned 2011 wagon will abandon the retro styling theme and become what one insider called "radically modern." It also will be bigger, with possible seating for seven. Essentially, it will be a mini-minivan, based on the replacement for the Opel Zafira. The vehicles will be developed on GM's next-generation Delta vehicle architecture. A concept may be revealed this year.
Yay for lost sales!

Tahoe, Suburban: The full-sized SUVs were scheduled to be restyled and re-engineered for the 2012 model year, but those plans are on hold. GM executives say high gasoline prices and stiffer fuel economy regulations may mean that the Tahoe and Suburban will be replaced by models developed on a stretched version of the Lambda platform.

Yay for trucks without balls, power and towing ability!

Avalanche: A scheduled restyling and re-engineering of the SUV-based pickup for the 2012 model year is on hold. The Avalanche may switch to the Lambda platform.
Why not Zeta again?

A redesign is on hold pending an analysis of new fuel economy regulations. The redesign had been scheduled for the 2012 model year on GM's GMT700 vehicle platform.

Exactly the truck GM needs for the exact time is on hold... Awesome.

Edited by FUTURE_OF_GM
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Depressing...just more FWD generics and a couple token RWD models. If they are going to f*ck around and not a have a Camaro convertible for '10, then I'll get a Mustang GT instead come June '10.

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Depressing...just more FWD generics and a couple token RWD models. If they are going to f*ck around and not a have a Camaro convertible for '10, then I'll get a Mustang GT instead come June '10.

Wait a little longer for the 400 hp 5.0L V8 for the 2011 model year.

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Wait a little longer for the 400 hp 5.0L V8 for the 2011 model year.

June '10 is my 40th birthday..that's why I was thinking of getting myself a mid life crisis fun car then... :)

Unfortunately, the only cars GM offers that I could seriously consider buying are the CTS, G8, and upcoming Camaro. I just can't sell out and go FWD.. I kind of like the Sostice and Sky, but the lack of usable trunk space and only having two seats kind of limit their appeal to me...though I may have to test drive the Red Line.

Edited by moltar
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If the Ava, Suburban and Tahoe go to a FWD based platform I will have a fit. They need a new design for the 2012 model year, just because the segment is getting smaller doesn't mean it is dead. Same goes for the Silverado.

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Seems to me like they're over reacting to the ecomomy making everything smaller. My family isn't getting any smaller. We're not going to haul less stuff. I bought a new Malibu because it's a sweet car compared to the Impala, even though it's a little small for my needs.

Competitive small cars are very important but do they really think people will abandon larger vehicles? I think the sting of $4/gallon gas will ease a bit. We'll see. I guess I'd be ok with a Tahoe getting 20mpg as long as I can haul and pull stuff.

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Competitive small cars are very important but do they really think people will abandon larger vehicles? I think the sting of $4/gallon gas will ease a bit.

CAFE will force people to abandon larger vehicles, unless they can afford a hybrid combined with a V6.

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If the Ava, Suburban and Tahoe go to a FWD based platform I will have a fit. They need a new design for the 2012 model year, just because the segment is getting smaller doesn't mean it is dead. Same goes for the Silverado.

Yeah, I guess all that BS about "maintaining our leadership position in trucks" was just that: corporate :bs:

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Seems to me like they're over reacting to the ecomomy making everything smaller. My family isn't getting any smaller. We're not going to haul less stuff. I bought a new Malibu because it's a sweet car compared to the Impala, even though it's a little small for my needs.

Competitive small cars are very important but do they really think people will abandon larger vehicles? I think the sting of $4/gallon gas will ease a bit. We'll see. I guess I'd be ok with a Tahoe getting 20mpg as long as I can haul and pull stuff.

-OR-

People will just buy a Tahoe/Suburban and buy a more efficient (used) daily driver.

I know a guy who did just that, and my family has been doing it for years with our classics and trucks.

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CAFE will force people to abandon larger vehicles, unless they can afford a hybrid combined with a V6.

So those of us who tow things and actually use our trucks will abandon them? I think not.

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-OR-

People will just buy a Tahoe/Suburban and buy a more efficient (used) daily driver.

I know a guy who did just that, and my family has been doing it for years with our classics and trucks.

I think GM may depend on the reverse... those who tow will go out and buy a used Tahoe/Suburban and buy a more efficient (new) daily driver.

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All they need is this.

Replace the Aveo with the Beat.

Bring on the Cruze

Merge the Impala and Malibu into one line. Do they relaly need two cars doing the same job if the Impala remains FWD.

Keep the HR but keep ist special. Copy a 1955 Suburban or Nomad. Keep it Cheap Keep, it cool, keep it fun and keep it usable. This is why they bought this vehicle when everyone said it was too late.

The Camaro is set but start work on a Alpha.

Bring on the HHR/Opel box and sell it along side the new HHR.

Go smaller on the Colorado. Take it back to the S10 concept size and look for ways to remove weight.

On the full size trucks and SUV. Invest in ways to improve the mileage in the trucks and keep most of the money in the trucks. The SUV need to be consolidated. Less models and less variations please.

Less but more effective models will better focus money to making better products and marketing them. They don't need 50 ok flavors when 20 really good ones will take care of the needs.

Anything Chevy can't cover is what Buick, Pointiac, GMC and Saturn are there for.

Edited by hyperv6
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Keep the HR but keep ist special. Copy a 1955 Suburban or Nomad. Keep it Cheap Keep, it cool, keep it fun and keep it usable. This is why they bought this vehicle when everyone said it was too late.

that might be an interesting idea, for each consecutive generation emulate an old style until you find one that really hits a market. marketing-wise the HHR would become a symbol for a revived retro Chevy model, for example one magazine inlet could feature two dust roads, on one you have the shadow of the old Suburban with 2005 HHR layered over it [they can cheat and do the SS model picture] and the other side feature an old Nomad concept and then the new HHR. I'd think making HHR into the Nomad concept from a few years back, the one on Kappa, base it on Gamma, excellent handling, quality retro touches, feature a lot of customizability, and you might siphon over Mini buyers, plus hit a much broader audience with a lower price point, say around $16k. fuel mileage targets could be hit, the fun car meter would be hit, and the design might be a big enough success to warrant subsequent generations.

the only problem I see is GM's own product plan is already so convoluted. Nobody has a small car yet like this at GM, and the spot is sorely missing. Within a couple years there will be yet another Japanese invasion happening on this category, the 240sx replacement and Honda's CR-X hybrid. yet again GM will be caught flat-footed on a hot segment.

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that might be an interesting idea, for each consecutive generation emulate an old style until you find one that really hits a market. marketing-wise the HHR would become a symbol for a revived retro Chevy model, for example one magazine inlet could feature two dust roads, on one you have the shadow of the old Suburban with 2005 HHR layered over it [they can cheat and do the SS model picture] and the other side feature an old Nomad concept and then the new HHR. I'd think making HHR into the Nomad concept from a few years back, the one on Kappa, base it on Gamma, excellent handling, quality retro touches, feature a lot of customizability, and you might siphon over Mini buyers, plus hit a much broader audience with a lower price point, say around $16k. fuel mileage targets could be hit, the fun car meter would be hit, and the design might be a big enough success to warrant subsequent generations.

the only problem I see is GM's own product plan is already so convoluted. Nobody has a small car yet like this at GM, and the spot is sorely missing. Within a couple years there will be yet another Japanese invasion happening on this category, the 240sx replacement and Honda's CR-X hybrid. yet again GM will be caught flat-footed on a hot segment.

The HHR Nomad concept from SEMA was a good second gen. It featured the Malibu new Chevy face but hat the slanted pillars of the Nomad in the roof line. Kind of something old something new.

Now that I have a HHR I have learned from many other owners what drew them in and it was styling and price. More recent buyer also went for the same reasons but also MPG.

Just for Chevy to go to a Mazda 5 formula shows no imagination and just makes them just another boxy minivan.

The other thing is they can do like Chrysler did with the PT and not chang it much at all.

I can say the reaction I have had with the SS is that most think I customized it. Once they learn it is stock they are shocked. When they learn the prices they are really shocked. The age appeal also ranges from 6-60. The import guys are all over it as well as 40 somethings as well as those approching 70. Find a minivan that will do that.

Chevy has a good formula here and needs to capitalize on it. If they just do a normal mini van replacment the sales will never top 100,000 for any year.

Edited by hyperv6
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The HHR Nomad concept from SEMA was a good second gen. It featured the Malibu new Chevy face but hat the slanted pillars of the Nomad in the roof line. Kind of something old something new.

Now that I have a HHR I have learned from many other owners what drew them in and it was styling and price. More recent buyer also went for the same reasons but also MPG.

Just for Chevy to go to a Mazda 5 formula shows no imagination and just makes them just another boxy minivan.

The other thing is they can do like Chrysler did with the PT and not chang it much at all.

I can say the reaction I have had with the SS is that most think I customized it. Once they learn it is stock they are shocked. When they learn the prices they are really shocked. The age appeal also ranges from 6-60. The import guys are all over it as well as 40 somethings as well as those approching 70. Find a minivan that will do that.

Chevy has a good formula here and needs to capitalize on it. If they just do a normal mini van replacment the sales will never top 100,000 for any year.

retro styling may have been a key to HHR's success, and it's continued sales success is definitely boosted by its perceived style, but going forward I don't beleive retro styling to be a crucial element to small people movers, or mini crossovers, or mini minivans, whatever form HHR takes on. I do think the right style hasn't been capatilized for small movers and obviously the HHR is a dynamic case study to prove me wrong. The division happening now is medium crossovers [Edge/Equinox category] and medium large crossovers [Acadia/Freestyle] are beginning to take the reins from large minivans. Still automakers see a growing potential for a segment of buyers looking at fuel efficient people movers. No one can deny there is a subset that bought into HHR [and PT]. based on price, practicality, small size, efficiency, and notable style quotient. The question is are those buyers going to keep coming back and can they be better served by a different type of vehicle.

After going over that in my head, I do think it's a gamble, and those buyers may not return to the newer, global small car based HHR, with its 'modern design'. I guess the answer will come with the upcoming concept, if it happens. From my view, if the execution is right, they may even invent a new segment, which HHR couldn't do, and find even more buyers.

With HHR, the retro cues dramatically reduced useable space and one of HHR's biggest detriments is its lack of functionality and efficiency. its overall weight, practicality, and lack of fuel efficiency dramatically hurt resale value, which is an ultimate determinant of any given vehicle's desirability quotient. A lot of people buy new cars on a whim, based on style, and automakers make cheap credit so easy...but with used cars there is a lot of research, practicality, and comparison that factor into the decision.

HHR has been a success, there's no negating that, even given fleet numbers, it even sells better than a Mazda3 for example. HHR has a lot to offer, but only if one views it as a small SUV. if one views it as a mini-transporter or small car crossover, than efficiency, practicality, and functionality has to be one of its key downfalls. HHRs design definitely has appeal to a core audience, mostly conservative older buyers who like a little flair in thier transportation. I believe there is a smarter design that has even more breakout appeal, much broader appeal, and more enduring appeal. though HHR's numbers have endured and key styling cues are still attractive, from my view it was old within months. that's given a more design-centric view of things. remember where I am and the type of cars I see on a daily basis. those not living in the kind of car-frenzy area I'm in will see this differently and perhaps think it had much more staying power than I.

HHR was gold, but not solid gold hit status. it was short on key measures such a vehicle requires in its class. but as a design study, the lesson learned is good, appealing and unique design cues can make a people mover even more successful than it already could have been. it's especially noteworthy the HHR has had continued success.

Edited by turbo200
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The other potential winner is Groove in all this. thegriffon has mentioned plenty of times the Groove will make its way here on a bigger platform, Gamma. Groove will now spiritually be an HHR, given it's small size and stature, practicality, cheap price, and efficiency, and cool cute ute style. HHR was always a cute ute, but with small wagon proportions. Groove can be a better handling vehicle while retaining the small car proportions and cute ute look and feel.

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on other future products...trying to remain optomisic, if I was in charge of keeping the company afloat my goal would be utmost desirability and differentiation amongst products, as well as quality goals, and driveability standards.

an Impala based on Epsilon should look more like a spiritual successor to the Impala SS from the 90's, well in shape only, the features and surface treatment should be modern. I'd like to see a box shape, with a slant cut roof, something that could form into a rear hatch, something that could look more like the Saab 9-5 concept drawings we were seeing a while back with a stretch roof and rear end that was punctuated with a hatch. something broad, muscular, large, and imposing. If I have to have an Impala that is a FWD Epsilon, then that's the design I'd make.

In addition, driveability standards for FWD cars need to improved across the board. No longer going into the future will vanilla input and soft feedback meet the cut. Increasingly drivers and car companies are making standard lines of tractable, pliant suspensions, great road feel, and flexible engines. This I expect from all future GM cars, if the cut is not there I will continue to see them is not deserving of my respect and as a left behind automaker, standing behind the leaders of engineering.

Back to future product, the above Groove and Alpha Camaro sound very interesting. A convertible, hatch, and wagon Cruze should make the jump over here. Going forward, this will be GM's most important car line, in America, and potentially across the globe. the true compact, Aveo, should be renamed, but this car also sounds good for the future. Replacements for Epsilon vehicles need to arrive sooner than 2012. At least for Impala G6 and Aura, Malibu could feasibly be competitive in its current guise around that time.

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retro styling may have been a key to HHR's success, and it's continued sales success is definitely boosted by its perceived style, but going forward I don't beleive retro styling to be a crucial element to small people movers, or mini crossovers, or mini minivans, whatever form HHR takes on. I do think the right style hasn't been capatilized for small movers and obviously the HHR is a dynamic case study to prove me wrong. The division happening now is medium crossovers [Edge/Equinox category] and medium large crossovers [Acadia/Freestyle] are beginning to take the reins from large minivans. Still automakers see a growing potential for a segment of buyers looking at fuel efficient people movers. No one can deny there is a subset that bought into HHR [and PT]. based on price, practicality, small size, efficiency, and notable style quotient. The question is are those buyers going to keep coming back and can they be better served by a different type of vehicle.

After going over that in my head, I do think it's a gamble, and those buyers may not return to the newer, global small car based HHR, with its 'modern design'. I guess the answer will come with the upcoming concept, if it happens. From my view, if the execution is right, they may even invent a new segment, which HHR couldn't do, and find even more buyers.

With HHR, the retro cues dramatically reduced useable space and one of HHR's biggest detriments is its lack of functionality and efficiency. its overall weight, practicality, and lack of fuel efficiency dramatically hurt resale value, which is an ultimate determinant of any given vehicle's desirability quotient. A lot of people buy new cars on a whim, based on style, and automakers make cheap credit so easy...but with used cars there is a lot of research, practicality, and comparison that factor into the decision.

HHR has been a success, there's no negating that, even given fleet numbers, it even sells better than a Mazda3 for example. HHR has a lot to offer, but only if one views it as a small SUV. if one views it as a mini-transporter or small car crossover, than efficiency, practicality, and functionality has to be one of its key downfalls. HHRs design definitely has appeal to a core audience, mostly conservative older buyers who like a little flair in thier transportation. I believe there is a smarter design that has even more breakout appeal, much broader appeal, and more enduring appeal. though HHR's numbers have endured and key styling cues are still attractive, from my view it was old within months. that's given a more design-centric view of things. remember where I am and the type of cars I see on a daily basis. those not living in the kind of car-frenzy area I'm in will see this differently and perhaps think it had much more staying power than I.

HHR was gold, but not solid gold hit status. it was short on key measures such a vehicle requires in its class. but as a design study, the lesson learned is good, appealing and unique design cues can make a people mover even more successful than it already could have been. it's especially noteworthy the HHR has had continued success.

I have 7 coworkers and two friends other than myself that have HHR's. Each one of us bought them as they were affordable, sporty in the 2 SS versions we have and not a minivan. Each one of us would never buy a traditional styled minivan.

If the future HHR is retro or not the key is styling. If GM just make the new one a traditional box I can point to 10 owners of an HHR that would be lost if it was not replaced with a cool fun styled affordable vehicle.

Chevy sold 99,000 plus HHR's this year based on the sheet Scott Settlmire sent me. This was down till gas went up and they became hard to find at many dealers from June to August. I had to go throght 3 days of shearching to find the SS with the options I wanted and one color change.

For the HHR to perform as well as it had after the press claiming it was too late to the market is a big win. Imagine if they were first.

The key with people movers is to find ways to make them stand out. Hummer H2 and 3 were nothing but Chevy Tahoes with some improvments and look at me styling. People were willing to pay more. The Malibu is dfoing very well as it is price well and the styling is very well done for it's price class.

Styling in general is what Lutz has preached and if they forget that they are going to return to their past and GM can not afford that right now.

Also Japan can hardly style themselves out of a corner. GM needs to take advantage of that.

Styling is what will save GM if they let it. And I don't mean it in a Aztec or Transport kind of way. The new CTS, HHR and Malibu each have shown what they can do and GM needs to learn from itself.

Edited by hyperv6
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