Drew Dowdell

No more BMW V10s or Mercedes V12s

12 posts in this topic

First from Autoblog:

After two decades of normally-aspirated high-revving engines shoehorned under the hoods of its M cars, BMW is changing direction and will begin to offer direct-injection turbocharged powerplants in its future high-performance flagships. The German automaker is blaming tough environmental emission standards and the soaring manufacturing costs of the specialty-built V8 and V10 engines found in today's M3, M5, and M6 models for its decision. We also suspect the fact that both Audi and Mercedes-Benz have successfully offered torque-laden forced-induction powerplants for years on their performance models may have something to do with it (also keep in mind that an aftermarket-tuned version of BMW's own twin-turbo 3.0-liter inline-6 can easily match the power output of the M3's normally-aspirated 4.0-liter V8). The first new M model to carry the turbocharged honor will be the X6 xDrive M, with a twin-turbo 4.4-liter V8 reportedly making 500 hp and 516 lb-ft of torque. That same engine is reportedly going into the next F10-chassis M5 due in late 2010.

------

The 2010 M5 will have less horsepower and less torque than the 2009 CTS-V?

Second from Autoblog:

Mercedes-Benz, longtime stalwarts of the V12 engine, is considering lowering its preferred cylinder count by a third. While our first inclination is to assume that this change is being made to increase the fuel efficiency and lower the emissions of the overall Daimler line, the real reason that the bent-12 engine program is being dropped is simply because the block is too long. A V12 is, for all intents and purposes, the same length as an inline-six, and the German automaker's latest line of mainstream engines are all in a V-design, so its cars are no longer being designed with an engine compartment large enough to house such a lengthy engine. Fear not, power fans, as the company isn't abandoning high horsepower in general. The V12 program is apparently being shifted towards twin-turbo V8s, and the magic of forced-induction means there's no reason to assume that fewer cylinders will equal fewer ponies. Expect the moratorium on V12s to begin the next few years.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as MB goes, I've noticed that they've never offered their new 7AT with any of the V12 engines. Maybe this is a move to rectify that...

... though, if they still wanted to do 12 cylinders, I don't see why they couldn't investigate the W12 route.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh... BMW's best engines have long been their inline 6s, MB's are their V8s (except for 1 model, all the AMGs are V8s). The V10s at BMW were an anomaly.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As far as MB goes, I've noticed that they've never offered their new 7AT with any of the V12 engines. Maybe this is a move to rectify that...

... though, if they still wanted to do 12 cylinders, I don't see why they couldn't investigate the W12 route.

475 lb-ft is the ceiling for the torque that 7-speed will handle. With 738 lb-ft coming from those V12's it was not a possibility.

With forced induction on smaller engines MB may be capable of exceeding the 475 lb-ft, thus we may not see the 7-speed.

As for the W-12, the way it is set up, it may give equal or worse fuel economy compared to the V-12. W-12 is just a packaging convinience.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
475 lb-ft is the ceiling for the torque that 7-speed will handle. With 738 lb-ft coming from those V12's it was not a possibility.

With forced induction on smaller engines MB may be capable of exceeding the 475 lb-ft, thus we may not see the 7-speed.

The 6.2L V8 makes 465, so imagine what a hairdryer would do...

As for the W-12, the way it is set up, it may give equal or worse fuel economy compared to the V-12. W-12 is just a packaging convinience.

Interestingly enough, the Audi A8L W12 gets better EPA numbers than the S600, though that's more of an indictment against the size of each car.

As Autoblog said, though, MB was giving up the V12 due to packaging, not FE.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still surprises me that the haughty (non)gentlemen of Daimler would give this up.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good. I can't stand the BMW S65 and S85 engines. Over-hyped techno garbage.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And rumour has it the NG S4 due around 2014 will be powered by a turbo 4... the CTS range as the largest Cadillac starts to make sense now...

Edited by ZL-1
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

Loading...



  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room