Jump to content

Will people start buying gas guzzlers again?


JulianWilliams

Recommended Posts

The price for a barrel of oil has nosedived over the past half a year or so, and that has started to be felt at the pump, with petrol and diesel prices being significantly lower than they were a year ago. Will this change drivers' behaviour, steering them toward gas guzzlers again because they'll be so much cheaper to run due to the lower fuel costs?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I do not think so, for those that already drive full size trucks and SUV's in the absence of a Hybrid version they will get new auto's but for more and more people, I truly see a trend to go to higher mileage hybrids, alternative fuels like CNG or electric.

 

Marketing has won in changing the minds of many that want their AWD or 4x4 but in Hybrid or alternative fuel form.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Canada's already had a major uptick in truck sales, with RAM being the country's second best-selling vehicle. Used SUV's are also flying off the lots in the States. 

 

Plenty of predictions say that oil prices will be low for the next three years; I'd bet plenty of people seeking new cars on 36-month leases are banking on gas prices staying low and are upsizing their vehicle choices, accordingly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think some people may change their habits when driving, and try and get more things done at once than driving around for just one shop and cost more petrol that way. Since petrol prices can change and may need to keep a eye on how much they use and, be careful when driving and lower speed in town and try to save fuel and try and get discounts when filling up at stations. Some people may buy cars which, are fuel efficient and, use less petrol and good to drive around town and also good for long trips and would consume less when driving.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is it then.  It's a game.  Freedom of choice should never be squelched, as it will be when these overreaching CAFE standards take hold.

 

The new CAFE standards actually have the reverse effect of what you're talking about... if anything, it will encourage automakers to build bigger cars.  For example, all Chrysler has to do to keep the Hemi in the 300 without possibly being subject to a fine is increase the wheelbase by 2 inches.

 

Gas prices are artificially low in this country even before they dropped because they aren't collecting enough taxes to pay for proper road upkeep. 

 

Fuel economy is important to car shoppers these days... no one trusts that gas prices will stay this low.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Social Stream

  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Volkswagen has announced their next-generation of gas and diesel engines, launching in 2026 will be its last.
      “Our colleagues are working on the last platform for vehicles that aren’t CO2 neutral. We’re gradually fading out combustion engines to the absolute minimum,” said Michael Jost, strategy chief for Volkswagen.
      The German automaker has set aside $50 billion over the next five years to begin transforming itself into an electric car builder. The first rollout is beginning very soon with the Audi e-tron SUV and Porsche Taycan. By 2030, Volkswagen is planning to have more than 300 electric versions of cars, vans, trucks, and motorbikes.
      But the fading out of gas and diesel engines isn't going to be a quick thing. Jost said that Volkswagen would continue to "modify its combustion engine technology," in the coming years after the new platform for "vehicles that aren’t CO2 neutral". After 2050, Volkswagen may still be offering some gas and diesel models in places "where there is insufficient charging infrastructure."
      Source: Bloomberg

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Volkswagen has announced their next-generation of gas and diesel engines, launching in 2026 will be its last.
      “Our colleagues are working on the last platform for vehicles that aren’t CO2 neutral. We’re gradually fading out combustion engines to the absolute minimum,” said Michael Jost, strategy chief for Volkswagen.
      The German automaker has set aside $50 billion over the next five years to begin transforming itself into an electric car builder. The first rollout is beginning very soon with the Audi e-tron SUV and Porsche Taycan. By 2030, Volkswagen is planning to have more than 300 electric versions of cars, vans, trucks, and motorbikes.
      But the fading out of gas and diesel engines isn't going to be a quick thing. Jost said that Volkswagen would continue to "modify its combustion engine technology," in the coming years after the new platform for "vehicles that aren’t CO2 neutral". After 2050, Volkswagen may still be offering some gas and diesel models in places "where there is insufficient charging infrastructure."
      Source: Bloomberg
    • By William Maley
      Last week, Ford shocked the industry by announcing that it would cut most of its passenger car lineup. The only models that would remain are the Mustang and the upcoming Focus Active - due to arrive in 2019. The move has earned a fair amount of ire from various folks, but the company is trying to push back and explain their reasoning.
      "We're going to feed the healthy part of our business and deal decisively with the parts that destroy value," said Ford CEO Jim Hackett to Automotive News.
      The "healthy part" are Ford's utilities and trucks. According to Ford CFO Bob Shanks, this part made more than $3 billion in the first quarter of 2018. Ford is projecting that light trucks will make up 90 percent of North American sales in the near future.
      The car side hasn't been faring as well with sales declining for the past few years. Ford hasn't said how much money they have been hemorrhaging on cars, but UBS analyst Colin Langan estimates Ford is losing $800 million per year on small cars in North America. Automotive News also notes that consumer demand for cars may be even weaker than first thought. Looking registration data from Polk, the outlet reports that a third of Fusions sold last year went to fleet buyers (about 69,874 models).
      Shanks said there are other items that could be cut, including "most Lincoln products" and chunks of Ford's overseas business.
      A number of people who hate this idea point out that this could hurt Ford if gas prices spike up like they did in the 2000s. But Jim Farley, Ford's head of global markets points out that the gap in fuel economy between sedans and crossovers has closed up significantly. The 2018 Fusion has a combined fuel economy rating of 27, while the Escape is rated at 26 mpg. 
      Farley also insisted that Ford isn't repeating the mistakes from the mid-2000s with their utility vehicles that almost sent them to the brink. The industry he says has "fundamentally changed" since then.
      "Customer view and experimentation on the utility side is so much more broad. Utilities are the preferred body style. This wasn't the case before the downturn," said Farley.
      "We intend to expand our passenger car lineup in the U.S We also intend to serve similar, affordable price points to today. What's changed here is just the format of the vehicle. Our dealers will have just as much opportunity to grow, just with a different portfolio."
      Still, there are some that are very skeptical about Ford's new strategy. 
      "Eight years ago, Ford Motor Co. announced it was killing Mercury. It assured us not to worry, because there would be no problem taking care of Mercury customers at Ford dealerships — those customers would just buy Tauruses and Fusions," said Chris Lemley, owner of Sentry Auto Group near Boston.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
    • By William Maley
      Last week, Ford shocked the industry by announcing that it would cut most of its passenger car lineup. The only models that would remain are the Mustang and the upcoming Focus Active - due to arrive in 2019. The move has earned a fair amount of ire from various folks, but the company is trying to push back and explain their reasoning.
      "We're going to feed the healthy part of our business and deal decisively with the parts that destroy value," said Ford CEO Jim Hackett to Automotive News.
      The "healthy part" are Ford's utilities and trucks. According to Ford CFO Bob Shanks, this part made more than $3 billion in the first quarter of 2018. Ford is projecting that light trucks will make up 90 percent of North American sales in the near future.
      The car side hasn't been faring as well with sales declining for the past few years. Ford hasn't said how much money they have been hemorrhaging on cars, but UBS analyst Colin Langan estimates Ford is losing $800 million per year on small cars in North America. Automotive News also notes that consumer demand for cars may be even weaker than first thought. Looking registration data from Polk, the outlet reports that a third of Fusions sold last year went to fleet buyers (about 69,874 models).
      Shanks said there are other items that could be cut, including "most Lincoln products" and chunks of Ford's overseas business.
      A number of people who hate this idea point out that this could hurt Ford if gas prices spike up like they did in the 2000s. But Jim Farley, Ford's head of global markets points out that the gap in fuel economy between sedans and crossovers has closed up significantly. The 2018 Fusion has a combined fuel economy rating of 27, while the Escape is rated at 26 mpg. 
      Farley also insisted that Ford isn't repeating the mistakes from the mid-2000s with their utility vehicles that almost sent them to the brink. The industry he says has "fundamentally changed" since then.
      "Customer view and experimentation on the utility side is so much more broad. Utilities are the preferred body style. This wasn't the case before the downturn," said Farley.
      "We intend to expand our passenger car lineup in the U.S We also intend to serve similar, affordable price points to today. What's changed here is just the format of the vehicle. Our dealers will have just as much opportunity to grow, just with a different portfolio."
      Still, there are some that are very skeptical about Ford's new strategy. 
      "Eight years ago, Ford Motor Co. announced it was killing Mercury. It assured us not to worry, because there would be no problem taking care of Mercury customers at Ford dealerships — those customers would just buy Tauruses and Fusions," said Chris Lemley, owner of Sentry Auto Group near Boston.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Last week, Ford unveiled the Raptor Ranger. The bad news as we reported was the model wasn't going to come here, but a tweet from Ford's North America Product Communications manager gave some hope that possibly, a smaller Raptor could come.
      More fuel has been added to this fire via some comments made by the chief engineer for Ford Performance, Jamal Hameedi. Speaking with Australian outlet Drive, Hameedi said the truck "would do really well in the states."
      “I think it’s certainly like it’s a baby Raptor, it depends what you’re looking for. There are a lot of people that just want that size in a pickup truck and they don’t want anything larger,” said Hameedi. 
      Hameedi went on to say that the diesel engine found in the Ranger Raptor would likely be swapped for a gas engine.
      “I think most American off-roaders would actually prefer a petrol gas engine, but a diesel is the absolute way to go for the rest of the world.”
      We think a version of Ford's 2.3 EcoBoost could be the engine of choice for a U.S. variant. 
      But it will likely be a while before a final decision is made on the Ranger Raptor coming to the U.S.
      “We haven’t said anything about availability in the US, our first priority is to get a Raptor available to everyone on the planet earth. So Americans already have an F-150 Raptor, we’ve got to spread Raptors to the rest of the planet,” said Hameedi.
      Source: Drive

      View full article
  • Reader Rides

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...