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William Maley

Mercedez Benz News Fate of Mercedes-Benz Truck For U.S. To Be Decided Next Year

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Earlier this year, we reported that Mercedes-Benz was going forward on a midsize truck for certain markets towards the end of decade. We also reported that the U.S. arm wants the truck.

 

"We said to Stuttgart, 'We are open, and let us assess the market.' If that leads to us saying 'green light,' then we will bring it," said Steve Cannon, CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA.

 

So has a decision been made for the U.S. getting a midsize truck from Mercedes? According to Cannon, that decision has been pushed back by eight to ten months. The decision was expected to come down at the end of this year.

 

"The product is still very fluid. We've got time to make this decision, so we're not hurrying with it. We want to make sure the product fits this market's needs. If it doesn't, we're not bringing it -- I can tell you that," said Cannon to Automotive News at the Frankfurt Motor Show.

 

There wasn't a reason given as to why the decision was pushed back.

 

Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)


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I think a Mercedes truck would be better suited to pair with the Sprinter and Vito/Metris commercial vans and they may want to see how the commercial market wants mid-size trucks.  I don't think they plan on making a luxury pickup

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I think a Mercedes truck would be better suited to pair with the Sprinter and Vito/Metris commercial vans and they may want to see how the commercial market wants mid-size trucks.  I don't think they plan on making a luxury pickup

 

Of course not. That will be Nissan's job. 

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Mercedes-Benz is working on a midsize truck that will go on sale towards the end of the decade for certain marketplaces - the U.S. is not one of those places. Now this wouldn't be a luxury truck, it would be built for work. This further substantiated by Mercedes-Benz's commercial van division handling the development.

 

Steve Cannon, CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA :: "If Mercedes-Benz USA does get the truck, it will be positioned as a luxury vehicle, not a work truck.

Putting aside the very real issue that this is a segment MB has zero need to enter, sounds like they don't even have a firm grasp on the concept.

Edited by balthazar

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Of all the Eurpoean brands, Benz has the best chance of succeeding in the truck biz-mid-size or half-ton. They have diesel and gasoline powertrains, they know how to do BOF chassis (G-Class), and they can build 'em rugged (Unimog).

The problem is that unless they simply want to chase the high end of the segment, they may dilute the brand image in North America. Conversely, if they concentrate solely on the top end of the segment than GM is ready for them.

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Of all the Eurpoean brands, Benz has the best chance of succeeding in the truck biz-mid-size or half-ton. They have diesel and gasoline powertrains, they know how to do BOF chassis (G-Class), and they can build 'em rugged (Unimog).

The problem is that unless they simply want to chase the high end of the segment, they may dilute the brand image in North America. Conversely, if they concentrate solely on the top end of the segment than GM is ready for them.

Disagree. VW would most likely be the quickest to market and most successful. They already have a truck in production elsewhere that would likely do well here. All they have to do is federalize the next generation of it and send it to dealers.

MB has to start from scratch or dial up Ghosen. MB isn't going to be making a Superduty or 2500HD Denali competitor on a G wagon because they can't sell those in other markets. No, MB will be making what everyone in the US would call "lifestyle truck". Basically a luxury Ridgeline.

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The G-wagon is much more 'ignoring a platform for 30 years' rather than 'knowing how to do BOF'. lol

I enjoy kicking fanbois in the plums as much as anyone, but the G-class was first and foremost a military vehicle. Like the Humvee and Jeep, it is rugged, simple, and rough as a cob. If I laugh at it it's mainly because they force AMG to hot-rod it.

VW could have done a good global-Ridgeline kind of thing. But I don't consider that a truck so much as a minivan with a bed. And VW has other, more pressing matters at this point.

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Know what else is rugged, simple and rough as a cob? This :

 

chevrolet%201969%20blazer.jpg

 

Maybe Chevy should re-introduce it, built to full '69 specs (Camino, I can hear you panting from across the Delaware; calm down; it's not happening!) and build a luxury truck on it.

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Ok ok... I see your point. And no, I'd never buy a Benz half-ton myself.

But if they decided to go for it, you can be sure it would be interesting.

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Maybe it would. Then again, nissan said the same thing when they launched their full-size truck and we all know….. waitaminnit, is a rebadged nissan-benz still in the running? :crazyeyes: 

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Maybe it would. Then again, nissan said the same thing when they launched their full-size truck and we all know….. waitaminnit, is a rebadged nissan-benz still in the running? :crazyeyes: 

 

I never thought it was out of the running... 

 

The Best or Nissan. 

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The Unimog makes the Hummer H1 look weak.  Mercedes knows how to build awesome off roaders. 

 

I still think this pickup truck would be a Frontier chassis with a Mercedes 4-cylinder diesel and 7-speed auto (9-speed eventually), the dash from a Sprinter/Metris.  And it will be sold as a commercial work vehicle.

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Both that Nissan and Mercedes rendering look really good to me.

 

I don't see why they wouldn't do this. Pretty much all of the German brands are making vehicles upon vehicles that just just overlap and serve no real distinct purpose. Might as well continue the trend.

 

That said, I wouldn't want it, and I don't think it'd sell really well.

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The Unimog makes the Hummer H1 look weak.  Mercedes knows how to build awesome off roaders. 

 

I still think this pickup truck would be a Frontier chassis with a Mercedes 4-cylinder diesel and 7-speed auto (9-speed eventually), the dash from a Sprinter/Metris.  And it will be sold as a commercial work vehicle.

Disagree with you on Unimog, they are capable offroads, but they do not make the Hummer weak. I will take a Hummer over a Unimog any day. Testing has proven that the Unimog higher center of gravity causes more issues than the Hummer and the Hummer can be IED proof, have not seen one single Unimog as a military IED proof ride.

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