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The 90-Second Oil Change - BREAKTHROUGH


ccap41

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"The oil change may be about to endure a change of its own.

 

A big motor-oil maker plans to announce Thursday that it has achieved a breakthrough in engine-lubrication design that makes it easy to change the oil in a vehicle in as little as 90 seconds,

 

Castrol, a division of BP, says the modification over current designs also lowers carbon emissions and fosters recycling.

The new system, which Castrol has dubbed Nexcel, must be integrated into vehicle engines at the design stage. That means it won't hit mainstream cars for another five years — about the length of time between major model changes for many automakers.

 

Castrol said it's in discussions with several major automakers to speed adoption of the Nexcel system, which it brags is significantly faster than the 20 minutes it traditionally takes to get an oil change. ..."

 

The rest can be read at: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2015/10/08/castrol-engine-oil-advancement/73527408/?ref=yfp

 

 

 

There is more, I wasn't sure if I was allowed to post the entire article here or not.

Edited by ccap41
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I think a lot is customer satisfaction when it comes to time. Plus, it looks like the errors and mistakes will be brought down to zero as it looks like it is just a drop in/plug-n-go type of change.  I think a lot of it depends how expensive this will be. If it goes the way they probably want it to go this will put out every small shop around. 

 

Also curious if this will be the kind of thing that will be on the shelves at Wal*Mart and the auto parts stores?

 

It's so intriguring.

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That's how it looks..

Personally, I enjoy changing my own oil. I had a job changing oil and tires and for the most part, I really enjoyed the job. There's just no money in it..which is why I'm still in school for accounting. So I wouldn't like my own cars to have that but when I'm older and it isn't easy to get under a car and they're already making it difficult with under belly pans and skid plates as it is..it would be nice. And it's already a handful of years off as it is, according to them.

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Lowering the carbon emissions is a good thing... but I'm not sure making an oil change quicker is that important to the grand scheme of things. 

 

I have to disagree wholeheartedly.

 

Oil changes are messy, pain in the ass maintenance that everyone must perform 1 to 3 times annually. Even moreso given the fact that so many new cars have terrible packaging under the hood. In my own car, oil filter access requires removal of the intake tubing or contorting your arm up into the car between hot components from underneath.

 

This development would essentially make oil changes as simple as changing an air intake filter. Rather than needing a whole bay in an auto shop and time on a lift, a technician could change the oil in the parking lot without setting foot in the vehicle. Any person with an ounce of motivation could perform an oil change themselves instead of putting it off (as people do) for 10,000+ miles risking engine damage because they don't have the equipment at home or can't fit the inconvenience of a dealer visit into their life.

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Lowering the carbon emissions is a good thing... but I'm not sure making an oil change quicker is that important to the grand scheme of things. 

 

I have to disagree wholeheartedly.

 

Oil changes are messy, pain in the ass maintenance that everyone must perform 1 to 3 times annually. Even moreso given the fact that so many new cars have terrible packaging under the hood. In my own car, oil filter access requires removal of the intake tubing or contorting your arm up into the car between hot components from underneath.

 

This development would essentially make oil changes as simple as changing an air intake filter. Rather than needing a whole bay in an auto shop and time on a lift, a technician could change the oil in the parking lot without setting foot in the vehicle. Any person with an ounce of motivation could perform an oil change themselves instead of putting it off (as people do) for 10,000+ miles risking engine damage because they don't have the equipment at home or can't fit the inconvenience of a dealer visit into their life.

 

Hey, your 3.6 is the same as the Acadia/Traverse/BuickWhateverIt'sCalled right? When I used to change oil we would loosen that filter by reaching down from under the hood rather than trying to bend your arm from under the car. If nothing else you should be able to break it loose from up top with more torque and then when your arm is all bent up underneath you won't have to struggle to break it loose.

 

Heck, the way these oil changes look they are a lot easier than most air filters even! But yes, I know what you mean.

 

Also, time is money. One way or another somebody isn't being productive while waiting for their oil change, most of the time. Not all of the time...but most.

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Lowering the carbon emissions is a good thing... but I'm not sure making an oil change quicker is that important to the grand scheme of things. 

 

I have to disagree wholeheartedly.

 

Oil changes are messy, pain in the ass maintenance that everyone must perform 1 to 3 times annually. Even moreso given the fact that so many new cars have terrible packaging under the hood. In my own car, oil filter access requires removal of the intake tubing or contorting your arm up into the car between hot components from underneath.

 

This development would essentially make oil changes as simple as changing an air intake filter. Rather than needing a whole bay in an auto shop and time on a lift, a technician could change the oil in the parking lot without setting foot in the vehicle. Any person with an ounce of motivation could perform an oil change themselves instead of putting it off (as people do) for 10,000+ miles risking engine damage because they don't have the equipment at home or can't fit the inconvenience of a dealer visit into their life.

 

Hey, your 3.6 is the same as the Acadia/Traverse/BuickWhateverIt'sCalled right? When I used to change oil we would loosen that filter by reaching down from under the hood rather than trying to bend your arm from under the car. If nothing else you should be able to break it loose from up top with more torque and then when your arm is all bent up underneath you won't have to struggle to break it loose.

 

Heck, the way these oil changes look they are a lot easier than most air filters even! But yes, I know what you mean.

 

Also, time is money. One way or another somebody isn't being productive while waiting for their oil change, most of the time. Not all of the time...but most.

 

 

In Epsilon I sedans, the intake tube crosses the engine and blocks filter access. So you spend extra time and extra steps from above, or you do the whole change in one step from below (albeit painfully).

 

Engine_Bay_After.jpg

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Ohhhhhh the air filter on the Acadia/Travers/Buick is in a different location where you can get your hand down there, albeit tough still. I burned my hand once pretty nasty on the manifold because the filter is basically tucked under it. STUPID design. But it is still easier than going from underneath.

 

It sucks because it is one of those things where you say to yourself "I'll never buy another car like this" but when youre car shopping there are SOOOOOO many other things to worry about instead of the oil filter location.

 

ps. With all the oil changes I've done, I can honestly say I'm not sure if I ever came across a Maibu of your generation with a 3.6. ALL of them were the 4cyl.  2.4L, right?  Also,sorry this is waaaay off topic at this point, how the F do you change your headlights? Do you have to go through the wheelwell? If so, can it be done with just turning the wheel or do you have to actually take the wheel off?

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quite interesting.

Im curious to know how the system works to get the oil back on top of the engine in the cartridge? Because, if Im not mistaken, gravity is what  makes the oil flow outta the car the  'ol fashioned way of oil changes, right?

 

I guess dry sump oil lubrication technology is involved.

 

Its cool non the less.

 

Are car companies gonna agree with a standard cartridge?

Are all Chevys gonna use the same type of cartridge?

OK...maybe the needs of a Corvette may be different from a Volt, which maybe different from a Malibu, but does that mean, like the printers we have today, an abundance  of different types of cartridges between the same brand models within the same brand and many more types when other brands are concerned with their many models?

 

And what happens to the billion dollar industry that is the bread and butter money of dealerships and small garages?

Because THIS obviously facilitates do it yourself-er work. I guess the good 'ol days maybe coming back for certain things, but in 2015 when dealerships rely on servicing cars to stay afloat, I see many other areas that will increase in price.

 

Anyway. This is a pretty neat and nifty invention.

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Ohhhhhh the air filter on the Acadia/Travers/Buick is in a different location where you can get your hand down there, albeit tough still. I burned my hand once pretty nasty on the manifold because the filter is basically tucked under it. STUPID design. But it is still easier than going from underneath.

 

It sucks because it is one of those things where you say to yourself "I'll never buy another car like this" but when youre car shopping there are SOOOOOO many other things to worry about instead of the oil filter location.

 

ps. With all the oil changes I've done, I can honestly say I'm not sure if I ever came across a Maibu of your generation with a 3.6. ALL of them were the 4cyl.  2.4L, right?  Also,sorry this is waaaay off topic at this point, how the F do you change your headlights? Do you have to go through the wheelwell? If so, can it be done with just turning the wheel or do you have to actually take the wheel off?

 

"...do you have to take the wheel off?" LMAO!! I wish that was all!

 

No, you have to take off the entire front bumper, not joking. As for your 2.4L vs 3.6L comment, I come across a pretty high percentage of V6 models on the street, I'd venture a guess as high as 15-25% V6 models. They're much better driving cars than the base engine, hydraulic steering and almost 100 more hp/tq go a long way.

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Ohhhhhh the air filter on the Acadia/Travers/Buick is in a different location where you can get your hand down there, albeit tough still. I burned my hand once pretty nasty on the manifold because the filter is basically tucked under it. STUPID design. But it is still easier than going from underneath.

 

It sucks because it is one of those things where you say to yourself "I'll never buy another car like this" but when youre car shopping there are SOOOOOO many other things to worry about instead of the oil filter location.

 

ps. With all the oil changes I've done, I can honestly say I'm not sure if I ever came across a Maibu of your generation with a 3.6. ALL of them were the 4cyl.  2.4L, right?  Also,sorry this is waaaay off topic at this point, how the F do you change your headlights? Do you have to go through the wheelwell? If so, can it be done with just turning the wheel or do you have to actually take the wheel off?

 

"...do you have to take the wheel off?" LMAO!! I wish that was all!

 

No, you have to take off the entire front bumper, not joking. As for your 2.4L vs 3.6L comment, I come across a pretty high percentage of V6 models on the street, I'd venture a guess as high as 15-25% V6 models. They're much better driving cars than the base engine, hydraulic steering and almost 100 more hp/tq go a long way.

 

Lol I has a suspicion it was that bad of a process but I never really looked into it. We would have customers about once every two weeks want a bulb changed on a newer Malibu and we couldn't do it(not a full service shop). I'm amazed a simple service item like that would be designed to be covered up that poorly(or good - whichever way you want to look at it).

 

I agree 100% that newer cars are tougher and tougher to do a simple oil change on because things are getting hidden and tucked away much more now. I mean there probably isn't a car made in 2016 that has a completely exposed oil pan. Trucks are about it but even those usually have some form of a skid plate.

 

Oh I believe there are a lot out there it was just the cheap peple driving them trying to get the cheapest oil changes allllllll drove the 2.4. Who would have guessed, right? lol  Oh jeez, 100hp/tq is a massive difference. I know I'd take the mpg hit for it. I took the mpg hit on my Escape getting the 240/270 2.0L over the 178/184 1.6L. Give me even more to make it a 100hp gap and YES PLEASE.

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Lowering the carbon emissions is a good thing... but I'm not sure making an oil change quicker is that important to the grand scheme of things. 

 

I have to disagree wholeheartedly.

 

Oil changes are messy, pain in the ass maintenance that everyone must perform 1 to 3 times annually. Even moreso given the fact that so many new cars have terrible packaging under the hood. In my own car, oil filter access requires removal of the intake tubing or contorting your arm up into the car between hot components from underneath.

 

This development would essentially make oil changes as simple as changing an air intake filter. Rather than needing a whole bay in an auto shop and time on a lift, a technician could change the oil in the parking lot without setting foot in the vehicle. Any person with an ounce of motivation could perform an oil change themselves instead of putting it off (as people do) for 10,000+ miles risking engine damage because they don't have the equipment at home or can't fit the inconvenience of a dealer visit into their life.

 

 

 

That's more GM design weirdness than anything.  On the CTS with the same engine, the oil filter is on the top of the engine. It is a cartridge that you pull out.

 

3-27.jpg

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^ and they make sure it's good and covered up too(just a plastic engine cover). The early CTSs were easier to get to but those filter housings would tighten down on their own for some reason or it had to do with the metals expanding/contracting and they would be an absolute bitch to remove.

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I wish I had a filter layout like that. Must have something to do with transverse vs longitudinal engine bay packaging.

 

@ ccap - FE hit isn't nearly as bad as the window sticker (17/26 EPA rating compared to the 4-cylinder's 22/33). Just went 1044 miles on a vacation road trip and averaged out 28.4 mpg (hand calculated) with about 5% city mixed in. On the drive down, I averaged 31 mpg (DIC) with 70-75 mph highway speeds. It was crazy. Even if there was tailwind, I was driving through rain sporadically and using A/C most of the drive with the car loaded down.

Edited by cp-the-nerd
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I wish I had a filter layout like that. Must have something to do with transverse vs longitudinal engine bay packaging.

 

@ ccap - FE hit isn't nearly as bad as the window sticker (17/26 EPA rating compared to the 4-cylinder's 22/33). Just went 1044 miles on a vacation road trip and averaged out 28.4 mpg (hand calculated) with about 5% city mixed in. On the drive down, I averaged 31 mpg (DIC) with 70-75 mph highway speeds. It was crazy. Even if there was tailwind, I was driving through rain sporadically and using A/C most of the drive with the car loaded down.

 

That kind of MPG doesn't surprise me.  I always got 27mpg - 28mpg highway with my 2004 CTS.  You have 1 more gear and a bit more slippery profile. 

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  • 3 months later...

New update on the near-instant oil change. 

 

Aston Martin Vulcan has adapted the system.

http://blog.caranddriver.com/under-the-hood-of-aston-martins-vulcan-a-plug-and-play-oil-system/

 

"The idea is to ensure the right quality of oil is being used and to cut maintenance times, especially for cars like the Vulcan that may well be stored for extended periods between track outings. A secondary benefit is that, as the exact type of oil is known, it is easier to recycle after it’s been removed from the car. According to Castrol the box can withstand sustained 1.8-g loads and can handle flow rates of over 150 gallons a minute."

 

"Castrol is also serious about introducing a version into more mainstream machinery and is working to persuade carmakers to share its vision, the corporate prediction is that we’ll see a Nexcel-equipped production vehicle within five years. "

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