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William Maley

June 2016: Hyundai Motor America

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Hyundai Motor America Reports June Sales
  • Best June and Mid-Year Sales Ever
FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., July 1, 2016 – Hyundai Motor America today reported sales of 67,511 for the month of June, up slightly over a year ago and the company’s best June ever. Year-to-date sales of 374,061 represents Hyundai’s best first six months ever.
 
“Our CUVs continued to be shining stars for the month and had their best all-time sales in June,” said Derrick Hatami, vice president of national sales for Hyundai Motor America. “Tucson was the only vehicle in the compact SUV category to receive good ratings for both driver and passenger in the latest Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) small-overlap crash test ratings, just announced this past week, and customers are starting to take note.”
 
All three CUVs -- Tucson, Santa Fe and Santa Fe Sport – were up strong double digits for the month, with sales up 99 percent, 93 percent and 69 percent, respectively.

 

CARLINE

JUNE/2016

JUNE/2015

CY/2016

CY/2015

ACCENT

3,139

6,541

39,330

35,976

SONATA

11,854

15,199

104,401

95,821

ELANTRA

22,414

26,613

96,306

128,698

SANTA FE

18,345

10,446

57,444

54,738

AZERA

340

349

2,573

3,653

TUCSON

7,193

3,606

42,664

22,634

VELOSTER

1,700

2,065

12,923

11,201

GENESIS

2,395

2,513

17,385

17,270

EQUUS

131

170

1,035

1,159

TOTAL

67,511

67,502

374,061

371,150

 

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