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William Maley

Fiat News: Marchionne Says Alfa's Giorgio Platform Will Be Shared With Other FCA Brands

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The relaunch of Alfa Romeo has cost Fiat Chrysler Automobiles dearly. Speaking with analysts during the company's fourth-quarter earnings call, CEO Sergio Marchionne said the relaunch cost "in excess" of 2.5 billion euros (about $2.7 billion) so far. Back in 2014, FCA said it would invest 5 billion euros through 2018 to relaunch Alfa, though the timeframe has been pushed back to 2020. Alfa Romeo has also been losing money and will continue to do so until the full benefit of the Giulia and Stelvio hit.

To help curb costs, Marchionne told analysts that Alfa's Giorgio platform will be shared with other FCA brands; primarily Dodge, Jeep, and Maserati. 

"The investment in Alfa Romeo and certainly the technical investment in the architecture was something that was designed to benefit more than Alfa. I'm happy that we have finally found clarity of thought in the extension of these architectures well beyond Alfa," said Marchionne.

Marchionne said Giorgio would underpin "the whole Maserati development beyond 2018," along with large Jeeps and the next-generation of Dodge's rear-drive models. As we have we reported previously, Giorgio will underpin the next-generation Charger and Challenger. Automotive News learned from a source that the platform will underpin the next Journey and Durango crossovers, and possibly a new midsize sedan. No information was given about Jeep, but it seems the next-generation Grand Cherokee is a safe bet.

Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)


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BS, Believe it when we see it. Segio is a lying sack of Sh$t.

He took the billions out hurting the US brands to bring back his Italian Garbage Alfa and proved it was a mess as he has failed to deliver on anything he has stated.

Now the only way to save face is to then push out his Alfa crap onto the rest of the brands to try and justify his incompetence.

Face it Sergio, Alfa should have stayed Dead and Fiat could be killed and no one would shed a tear except the Italians.

"Garbage in Garbage out" a term that never fit a company so well as it does Fiat!

US should have Never let Fiat buy Chrysler, Jeep, Ram, Dodge. I would have rather merged GM and Chrysler than let Fiat buy them and screw it up even worse.

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10 hours ago, daves87rs said:

This can't be good....

 

Jeep is my biggest concern.....

Agree, Jeep is worth saving, yet could be destroyed at the rate Sergio is going in screwing up everything else.

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14 hours ago, dfelt said:

Agree, Jeep is worth saving, yet could be destroyed at the rate Sergio is going in screwing up everything else.

 

Yep....Agree too...you can't just mix products like this and expect good results....

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You guys do realize they are referring to the grand Cherokee, right?  A vehicle that has ALWAYS been unibody and for the current, and arguably best, generation has also ran a fully independent suspension.  The Wrangler will stay the Wrangler and they are just entering a new generation that will no doubt go on for at least the next 6 to 8 years.  I fail to see an issue besides trying to invent one.  

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2 hours ago, Stew said:

You guys do realize they are referring to the grand Cherokee, right?  A vehicle that has ALWAYS been unibody and for the current, and arguably best, generation has also ran a fully independent suspension.  The Wrangler will stay the Wrangler and they are just entering a new generation that will no doubt go on for at least the next 6 to 8 years.  I fail to see an issue besides trying to invent one.  

Alfa and Fiat have a track record of building garbage and I see no reason based on the alfa dealership here and the few that have been sold to coworkers that have had the auto in the shop more than in their own garage.

At least the old MB platform is very solid, I fear that the history will take the GC to a low that will hurt them not help them.

Sergio is considerably cutting corners trying to survive and I doubt they will offer a good unibody system that is better than the MB one.

They have much to prove about the alfa stuff.

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1 hour ago, dfelt said:

Alfa and Fiat have a track record of building garbage and I see no reason based on the alfa dealership here and the few that have been sold to coworkers that have had the auto in the shop more than in their own garage.

At least the old MB platform is very solid, I fear that the history will take the GC to a low that will hurt them not help them.

Sergio is considerably cutting corners trying to survive and I doubt they will offer a good unibody system that is better than the MB one.

They have much to prove about the alfa stuff.

The only Alfas that have really been sold thus far are very limited pure sports cars NOT based on this platform.  The Giullia is still rolling out and I doubt your coworkers have those yet.  THis is the first vehicle on the platform BTW.  So let's lot promote gloom and doom where there is ZERO reason to at this time. 

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1 hour ago, Stew said:

The only Alfas that have really been sold thus far are very limited pure sports cars NOT based on this platform.  The Giullia is still rolling out and I doubt your coworkers have those yet.  THis is the first vehicle on the platform BTW.  So let's lot promote gloom and doom where there is ZERO reason to at this time. 

History and stupid ideas like expanding Jeep dealerships by 400 so they are in miles of each other tends to not lead well with most that can look at poor quality and not see positive things.

I am 99.9% of the time a Half full glass guy, but right now FCA is doing nothing to change that they are half empty and getting lower with their decisions.

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17 hours ago, dfelt said:

History and stupid ideas like expanding Jeep dealerships by 400 so they are in miles of each other tends to not lead well with most that can look at poor quality and not see positive things.

I am 99.9% of the time a Half full glass guy, but right now FCA is doing nothing to change that they are half empty and getting lower with their decisions.

I am sorry, but the quality is nowhere near as bad as you are stating.  And jeeps sell like crazy.  While I do agree the dealer expansion is a bit optimistic to say the least........ right now,do we even have a timeframe on this?

Edited by Stew

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17 minutes ago, Stew said:

I am sorry, but the quality is nowhere near as bad as you are stating.  And jeeps sell like crazy.  While I do agree the dealer expansion is a bit optimistic to say the least........ right now,do we even have a timeframe on this?

Poor quality statement is in regards to Fiat, Alfa and in the case of Jeep the Renegade which is based on the POS Fiat. Rest of Jeep lineup I am fine with, I do worry about the new compass that is replacing the old compass/patriot. Fiat has failed to build any faith that they can engineer a quality auto.

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3 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Poor quality statement is in regards to Fiat, Alfa and in the case of Jeep the Renegade which is based on the POS Fiat. Rest of Jeep lineup I am fine with, I do worry about the new compass that is replacing the old compass/patriot. Fiat has failed to build any faith that they can engineer a quality auto.

Besides the transmissions on 1st year Renegades can you please enlighten me to specifics?  Also some proof that the just introduce Alfa sedan on it's new platforms with new engines has actually had reliability issues/

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7 minutes ago, Stew said:

Besides the transmissions on 1st year Renegades can you please enlighten me to specifics?  Also some proof that the just introduce Alfa sedan on it's new platforms with new engines has actually had reliability issues/

Jeep Renegade are all over the dealership lots with low miles. Like the fiats buyers seem to not hold onto them. This starts the question of why would you have so many with low miles, low selling prices on used lots.

http://www.truedelta.com/Jeep-Renegade/reliability-1289

Data is limited, but this little Jeep is just a rebadged Fiat 500 series.

Reviews also tend to have the yellow flag of caution.

http://www.truedelta.com/Jeep-Renegade/car-reviews-M203

Many of us here were taken or smitten with this little auto at first. Yet if you have test drove one and sat in one, you start to see many things from fit n finish to the over all tactile feel. This is an auto I could not recommend to family, friends or an acquaintance.

Alfa, I go by the sparse few that are here in washington state and the couple that are owned by others in my company that have had the auto in the shop more than at their home.

My opinion, Fiat / Alfa is still garbage just like they were back in the 70's when I was around them. Jeep Renegade sadly had to deal with it's origins which are poor to begin with.

My personal opinion.

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It is a platform mate for the 500x, not the regular 500.  And per your link.

 

The Jeep Renegade is essentially a Fiat underneath, and Fiats haven't been earning good marks in our quarterly car reliability survey. The ZF nine-speed automatic transmission used in the Renegade is also used in various Chrysler and Acura models, and many owners of those cars haven't been happy with it. On top of this, it hasn't yet been a year since the Renegade launched. So it should not come as a surprise that the limited amount of reliability data we have so far for the Renegade suggests worse-than-average (but not awful) reliability. While this doesn't constitute a red flag, a yellow flag is warranted. Buyers who expect virtually no repairs during the first few years of ownership, as some do, should probably await more solid reliability stats for the Renegade or buy something else. The Honda HR-V similarly seems to be suffering from some first-year niggles. We don't have reliability data for the Chevrolet Trax, but the modest amount we have for the closely related Buick Encore suggests that it has been very reliable. The Subaru Crosstrek has an excellent reliability record in our survey.

full 2016 Jeep Renegade review

 

Exactly what i said.  9 speed auto issues for the first year models.  Nothing more, nothing less. 

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    • By William Maley
      I couldn’t believe my eyes as to what stood before me. In the driveway stood an Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio. I had to touch it to see if I was imagining it. Okay, I am being a bit hyperbolic, but considering the long time it took Alfa Romeo to get its affairs in some semblance of order, it is amazing that the Giulia is on sale.

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      The system wouldn’t play my iPod if I had it paused for more than minute or if I switched to another audio source and then back to the iPod. Connecting my iPhone 7 Plus to the system via Bluetooth took on average about 45 seconds. I had the system crash on me twice during the week I had the Giulia. One of those crashes required me to turn off the vehicle and start it back up to get the system working again. Alfa Romeo needs to go back to the garage and do some serious work with this infotainment system.
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      EPA fuel economy figures for the Giulia Quadrifoglio are 17 City/24 Highway/20 Combined. My average for the week landed at 19.7 mpg.
      Handling is where the Giulia Quadrifoglio truly shines. Enter into a corner and Giulia hunkers down with little body roll and gives you the confidence to push a little bit further. Steering is another highlight, offering quick response and decent weight. The only complaint I have with the steering is that I wished for some road feel.
      There is a trade-off to Giulia’s handling and that is a very stiff ride. Even with the vehicle set in Advanced Efficiency or Natural mode, the suspension will transmit every road imperfection to your backside. Wind and road noise isolation is about average for the class.
      It is time to address the elephant in the room and that is Alfa Romeo’s reliability record. Since the Giulia went on sale last year, numerous outlets have reported various issues from a sunroof jamming to a vehicle going into a limp mode after half a lap on a track. The only real issues I experienced during my week dealt with infotainment system which made me breathe a sigh of relief. Still, the dark cloud of reliability hung over the Giulia and I never felt fully comfortable that some show-stopping issue would happen. This is something Alfa Romeo needs to remedy ASAP.
       Now we come to end of the Giulia Quadrifoglio review and I am quite mixed. Considering the overall package, the Quadrifoglio is not for everyone. No, it isn’t just because of reliability. This vehicle is a pure sports car in a sedan wrapper. It will put a big smile on your face every time you get on the throttle or execute that perfect turn around a corner. But it will not coddle you or your passengers during the daily drive. Add in the material quality issues and concerns about reliability, and you have a mixed bag.
      To some, that is the charm of an Alfa Romeo. Within all of those flaws is a brilliant automobile. For others, it is something that should be avoided at all costs.
      Disclaimer: Alfa Romeo Provided the Giulia, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Alfa Romeo
      Model: Giulia
      Trim: Quadrifoglio
      Engine: 2.9L 24-Valve DOHC Twin-Turbo V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 505 @ 6,500
      Torque @ RPM: 443 @ 2,500 - 5,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/24/20
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Cassino, Italy
      Base Price: $72,000
      As Tested Price: $76,995 (Includes $1,595.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Dynamic Plus Package - $1,500.00
      Harman Kardon Premium Audio System - $900.00
      Montecarlo Blue Metallic Exterior Paint - $600.00
      Quadrifoglio Carbon Fiber Steering Wheel - $400.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
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      Source: Autocar

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Alfa Romeo is reportedly working on Giulia-based coupe that could go on sale as early as next year.
      Autocar reports the new coupe will share most of the front panels found on the Giulia sedan, although a different grille is likely. The rest of the model will feature all new panels including a lower roof and rear-quarter panels. Engines are expected to be the same as the sedan - two versions of the 2.0L turbo-four (197 and 276 hp) and the twin-turbo 2.9L V6.
      There is also an Formula 1-style energy recovery system (ERS) that is being worked on for this model. ERS basically harvests kinetic energy from braking as electricity and stores in a battery. A driver can use this electricity to add a bit more boost. According to sources, Alfa is working on two powertrains featuring this system - the higher-output version of the 2.0L turbo and the twin-turbo 2.9L V6. Outputs are said to be 345 hp for the 2.0L and 641 hp for the 2.9L. 
      Source: Autocar
    • By William Maley
      If you thought Alfa Romeo was going to stop with just doing the Giulia sedan, think again. Motoring has learned that Alfa Romeo is planning to show a Giulia coupe at the Geneva Motor Show next month. 
      The report says the coupe will revive the Sprint name and take on the likes of the Audi A5, BMW 4-Series, and Mercedes-Benz C-Class coupe. The engine lineup will be the same as the sedan, which includes a turbocharged 2.0L four and the turbocharged 2.9L V6 found in the Quadrifoglio. Down the road,  Alfa will be adding a convertible and wagon to the Giulia lineup.
      No mention of when the Giulia Sprint could go on sale.
      Source: Motoring

      View full article
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