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    New York Auto Show: Ford Focus RS Lands On US Soil


    • Ford Focus RS Makes the Crossing for New York


    Since Ford made the announcement of the Focus RS and that it would be arriving in the U.S., we've been hungry for more details. Well Ford has dropped a few more bits as it announced that the Focus RS will make its North American debut at the New York Auto Show next week.

    There aren't really big differences between the North American-spec Focus RS to the Focus RS that will be sold in Europe. Power will come a turbocharged 2.3L four-cylinder producing at least 315 horsepower (expect more concrete performance numbers when we get closer to launch) and come paired with a six-speed manual and all-wheel drive combo. There will also be four different drive modes: Normal, Sport, Track, and Drift. As the name suggests, Drift will modify the torque distribution of the all-wheel drive to allow the vehicle to oversteer.

    Now for some bad news; While the Focus RS will appear at the New York Auto Show this year, you'll have to wait until next year to get your hands on one.

    Source: Ford

    Press Release is on Page 2


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    Wonder if it will show up in any of the games kids play on Xbox or Playstation? Should be a hit for FORD here in the US. With Mitsu appearing to be dropping the Evo unless I miss understand their news over the last year it would have left Suby all alone with the STI. This is good to see FORD bring this here. I wish GM has an AWD Pocket Rocket.

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    I wish GM has an AWD Pocket Rocket.

     

    I just wish GM had something in the sport compact car arena period.

     

     

    Closest they get is the Verano Turbo... and that is more like a compact sports tourer than a sports car.

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    I really wished the knowledge and expertise GM gained from the Cobalt SS Turbocharged would have continued.

     

    No matter how horrible the wrapper was, the candy was delicious.

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