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    Revealed! 2017 BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive


    • An M7 By Any Another Name


    Unlike many of its competitors, BMW has never officially done a performance oriented 7-Series (i.e. M7). Instead, they have used German tuner ALPINA to build a more potent version - the B7. With a new 7-Series in showrooms, it was only time before an announcement of a new B7 would appear. Yesterday, ALPINA announced the 2017 B7 xDrive.

     

    It starts with a 4.4L twin-turbo V8 that ALPINA messed around with and was able to extract 600 horsepower and 590 pound-feet (this engine in the 750i only produces 445 horsepower and 480 pound-feet). Power is sent to all four wheels via an eight-speed automatic. Alpina says the B7 xDrive can hit 60 MPH in 3.6 seconds and reach a top speed of 193 MPH.

     

    For the chassis, ALPINA sticks with the air suspension with adaptive dampers found on the standard 7-Series and adds active roll bars and four-wheel steering. A set of 20 or 21-inch wheels come wrapped in Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires. Behind the wheels are a set of massive brakes (15.5-inch discs up front, 14.5-inch discs in the rear).

     

    Outside, the B7 features unique fascias for the front and rear, spoiler on the trunk lid, and the choice of either ALPINA Blue Metallic and ALPINA Green Metallic paint. The interior gets Nappa leather, wood trim, and ceramic knobs and switches for various functions.

     

    The 2017 ALPINA B7 arrives at dealers this September. Pricing will be announced sometime before then.

     

    Source: BMW

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Power, Dynamics and Luxury combined for class-leading performance and a superior driving experience – the all-new 2017 BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive.

    • Unique combination of high-performance drivetrain with 600 bHP and xDrive all-wheel drive system provide a 0-60 mph acceleration time of just 3.6 seconds.
    • Most advanced suspension and chassis technology with ALPINA calibration including for the first time Integral Active Steering for ultimate dynamics and comfort.
    • Carbon Core body in conjunction with ALPINA specific suspension geometry and MICHELIN® Pilot Super Sport tires lead to high agility, direct handling and precise steering.
    • Special ALPINA Sport+ Mode adjusts all vehicle, drivetrain and suspension settings to maximum dynamic performance lowering ride height by 0.8 inches at the touch of a button.
    • The ALPINA design and aerodynamic elements underscore the elegant and athletic appearance of the new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive.


    Woodcliff Lake, N.J. February 8, 2016…Today, BMW of North America announced the all-new 2017 BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive, the third generation of ALPINA automobiles based on the BMW 7 Series offered in the US. The all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive stands for luxury paired with precision dynamics, effortless performance and comfort at the highest level. The 2017 BMW ALPINA B7 will be available in September 2016 at selected dealerships. Price will be announced closer to market launch.

     


    New generation 4.4 liter V8 engine with twin-turbo charging.
    The new 4.4 liter 8-cylinder engine with twin-turbo charging, gasoline direct injection and Valvetronic delivers an impressive output of 600 bHP between 5750 rpm and 6250 rpm, while the maximum torque of 590 lb-ft is available from 3000 rpm. The resulting performance figures are remarkable – the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive accelerates in just 3.6 seconds from 0 to 60 mph, 0.8 seconds faster than its predecessor while reaching a top speed of up to 193 mph (preliminary figure).The power output of this smooth high-tech engine unfolds with impressive emphasis across the entire rpm range. Excellent throttle response and high torque ensure that even at low engine speeds driver inputs are immediately transformed into forward acceleration.

     

    In addition, to ALPINA’s engineering expertise, a number of significant technical details are responsible for this engine’s power output and performance characteristics – particularly the air intake system, the intercooler and turbocharger configuration and the high-performance cooling system. The twin-turbo charging system comprises two specially developed turbochargers positioned in the V of the 8-cylinder engine. These feature twin-scroll turbochargers with enlarged inlet and outlet diameters. This configuration ensures optimal use of exhaust gas energy even at low engine speeds. The result is a fast power build-up and more torque at low engine speeds for overall exceptional engine response. At 2000 rpm the ALPINA’s V8 twin-turbo engine already produces 494 lb-ft of torque ensuring optimal performance .

     

    The overall aim during the development of the components of the ALPINA air intake system - from the air intake ducts to air filter housings and clean air intake manifold - was to achieve maximum airflow. All components of the high-performance cooling system are designed to remove bottlenecks and maximize effectiveness – special large-volume coolers are interconnected by large diameter hosing for maximum throughput. An indirect intercooler system (air to water) facilitates the implementation of short charge-air intake paths. Combined with additional external water coolers and a transmission oil cooler, the system ensures the thermodynamic stability of the V8 twin-turbo engine at all times, even under the highest loads and ambient air temperatures.

     

    Inside the engine special Mahle pistons and NGK spark plugs are designed to deal with the temperatures and loads associated with 20 psi of boost pressure and a compression ratio of 10.0:1.

     

    The stainless steel ALPINA sports exhaust system is responsible for a reduction in back pressure and weight. Active exhaust valves allow the driver to influence the sound experience by switching the Driving Dynamic Control switch between Comfort and Sport Mode. In typical ALPINA fashion: the two twin tailpipes of the exhaust system are integrated elegantly and aesthetically into the rear apron.

     

    Most advanced suspension and chassis technology with characteristic ALPINA dynamics.
    The all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive features cutting-edge suspension technology, offering its driver an exceptional range of driving experiences. The focus to retain the exceptional long-distance cruising comfort of the predecessor while at the same time significantly sharpening the agility, handling and lateral dynamics commensurate to the power output of the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive.

     

    The 2-axle air suspension system combined with Dynamic Damper Control and Active Comfort Drive with Road Preview guarantees the very highest level of driving comfort at all times while the Active Roll Stabilization minimizes body roll during cornering. The rear wheel steering of the Integral Active Steering system gives the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive a level of dynamic performance and light-footed handling, typically associated with sports cars. The Driving Dynamics Control switch serves as the central control over which to select the various parameters of all the systems that influence the driving dynamics of the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive. It also features an Individual Mode, which can be used to combine specific settings independently and in accordance to the driver’s preference.

     

    With the Driving Dynamics Control used to select the appropriate mode, the 2-axle air suspension system is primarily responsible for the exceptional level of ride comfort. It also enables ride height to be changed up or down which in combination with the other suspension systems facilitates the choice of a decidedly comfort or sport orientated chassis set-up. Overall, a maximum ride height adjustment range of 1.6 inches is available. At speeds above 140 mph the ride height of the BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive is lowered by 0.8 inches. This operating state, which can be activated manually to be effective regardless of the speed by selecting the special ALPINA Sport+ Mode, results in a lower center of gravity thereby increasing agility and high-speed stability. The lower ride height results in increased front wheel camber for even more direct turn-in when cornering. When needed, the ride height can also be raised by 0.8 inches up to a speed of 20 mph in order to increase ground clearance.

     

    The settings of the Electronic Damper Control, which influences both rebound and compression, are also selected using the Driving Dynamics Control. A broad range of ALPINA damper set-ups are available ranging from Comfort+ Mode for effortless and relaxed cruising to ALPINA Sport+ Mode for maximum dynamic performance.

     

    For the first time, the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive features Integral Active Steering, which in conjunction with the high-performance drivetrain and the all-wheel drive system, offers a dynamic driving experience par excellence. The Integral Active Steering combines a variable ratio electric steering system at the front axle with active steering on the rear axle whereby the wheels can turn a maximum of 3 degrees. Specially attuned to the ALPINA suspension and MICHELIN® performance tires, the rear axle steers opposed to the front axle at low speeds for increased agility and dynamic handling, while steering with the front axle at higher speeds for maximum high-speed directional stability.

     

    The all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive is fitted with MICHELIN® Pilot Super Sport tires measuring 255/40 ZR20 at the front and 295/35 ZR20 at the rear, mounted on 8.5 x 20 and 10 x 20 ALPINA CLASSIC wheels. New lightweight 21 inch forged wheels take the traditional 20-spoke ALPINA CLASSIC design into a new minimalistic and technical direction. Forging results in high-density and high-strength aluminum alloy which enables a weight-optimized construction that saves 5.5 lb of unsprung mass per wheel. The MICHELIN® Pilot Super Sport tires are specifically designed to meet the demands of high-performance sports cars. They contribute directly to the precise steering feel and handling of the new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive while foregoing run-flat technology in the interests of improved ride comfort.

     

    Comprising blue painted 4-piston fixed calipers and 15.5 in x 1.41 in discs on the front axle and floating calipers with 14.5 x 0.94 in discs on the rear axle, the high-performance brake system provides outstanding stopping power and deceleration.

     

    BMW xDrive intelligent all-wheel-drive system with ALPINA calibration
    The all-wheel drive system builds upon the technical potential of BMW’s xDrive system and its intelligent and dynamic distribution of drive power which continuously and fully variable distributes torque between the front and rear axle within milliseconds for maximum traction and control. The programming of the torque distribution control, which is interconnected with the Dynamic Stability Control and the engine management system, is performance-oriented and it increases driving agility and dynamics markedly – especially under lateral acceleration – while maintaining balanced and neutral handling. Besides allowing optimum traction under acceleration by eliminating slip induced losses, the system continuously monitors a wide range of sensory inputs – for example steering angle, lateral acceleration, yaw angle and speed – to distribute torque so as to achieve maximum safety in challenging conditions or when encountering sudden changes in road surface friction. The DTC Mode of the Dynamic Stability Control offers a more rear wheel drive bias torque distribution for even more dynamic handling.

     

    Automatic 8-speed Sports Automatic with ALPINA SWITCH-TRONIC.
    The BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive utilizes a new generation of the excellent 8-Speed Sport Automatic Transmission with ALPINA SWITCH-TRONIC. Further refined and adapted to the performance characteristics of the high-torque V8 twin-turbo in collaboration with ZF, the transmission offers exceptional driving comfort in all situations.Close gear ratios and a total spread of 7.81:1 improve shift comfort and efficiency. In Automatic Mode the combination of eight gears and high engine torque makes for relaxed, luxurious cruising at low engine rpm even when travelling at higher speeds.

     

    In Sport Mode the shift points have been optimized for improved driving performance and are considerably more dynamic with the option to activate the Launch Control function. For maximum dynamic performance, the driver selects the Manual Mode thereby actuating gear changes manually by using the SWITCH-TRONIC buttons on the back of the steering wheel or via the gear selector switch on the center console. In addition to lightning quick gear shifts (approximately a tenth of a second), this mode also holds the selected gear even when the engine hits the rev limiter.

     

    All components of the transmission such as the torque converter with lock-up clutch, the planetary wheel sets and the inner cooling are designed to specifically cope with the high torque output of the V8 twin-turbo engine. This means that no torque reduction is necessary during upshifts when selecting the Launch Control or when using the sportiest configuration of the Manual Mode. This contributes significantly to the striking longitudinal dynamics of the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive and allowing it to sprint from 0 – 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds. The transmission features the latest Comfort and Efficient Dynamics functions such as ConnectedShift (use of navigation data for an anticipatory shift strategy based on traffic routing) and Coasting (decoupling of the engine and transmission when coasting).

     

    Athletic and elegant design throughout the B7.
    The appearance of the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive is defined by athletic flair and elegance. The ALPINA design and aerodynamic elements emphasize its performance character, with the front and rear spoiler striking a harmonious balance and highlighting the powerful presence of the 2017 BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive. The design blends form and function – the aerodynamic components reduce lift on the front and rear axles to almost zero for maximum driving stability at all speeds. Openings at the front of the vehicle allow the precise and effective flow of air to the individual components of the high-performance cooling system. The iconic BMW kidney grille is fitted with an integrated air flap control system that adapts to the BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive’s cooling needs: when closed it further reduces the level of aerodynamic drag.

     

    The 20 inch ALPINA CLASSIC wheels with twenty spokes and concealed air valves give the powerful BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive a touch of elegance and lightness. In the interests of weight reduction and a striking technical appearance, the optional 21 inch ALPINA CLASSIC forged wheels with visible wheel bolts do not feature concealed air valves and wheel caps.

     

    The ALPINA sports exhaust system features two elliptical twin tailpipes that reflect the performance of the all-new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive and its powerful V8 engine. They are precisely integrated in the rear apron and give the rear a smooth, elegant look.

     

    The exclusive paint finishes in ALPINA Blue metallic and ALPINA Green metallic are a hallmark feature reserved solely for BMW ALPINA automobiles. Other BMW and BMW Individual paint finishes are also available for the 2017 BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive.

     

    Interior and Equipment.
    An extensive range of standard equipment ensures maximum well-being and comfort, including high-end Nappa leather, comfort seats, a leather-covered instrument panel, ceramic inserts on selected control elements and soft close doors. Equipment features that enhance effortless driving also come as standard in the new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive, such as a full-color Head-Up Display, a rear view camera, the latest BMW navigation and communication and infotainment systems.

     

    ALPINA details add exclusivity and individual style to the interior. Hand-finished using exceptionally high-quality LAVALINA leather, the sports steering wheel with blue and green stitching is captivating at the very first touch due to its gentle feel. Timeless Piano lacquer or classic Myrtle Luxury Wood - the ALPINA interior trim, door sills with blue illumination, ALPINA B7 model inscriptions and an individual production plaque are further examples of exclusive equipment features in the new BMW ALPINA B7 xDrive.

     

    Another exclusive ALPINA design is the full-color digital instrument panel in LED technology. In Comfort Mode it offers a classic look featuring round instruments with blue background and red needles. In Sport Mode the display changes to a more dynamic design with blue and green drag indicators and a focus on primary information, such as the centrally positioned permanent digital speed read-out.

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    OK, so this type of work we have seen from in-house OEMs so why does BMW need to use a 3rd party to do this?

     

    The dash is clearly dated from the late 70's to early 80's I feel. The exterior is not much better. Very conservative and does not scream performance.

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    So it's a sleeper. Stealth wealth. I like it. 

     

    As long as there's a thriving market for this kind of thing, I don't think it matters at all who does it.

     

    But it is intriguing how the M division shuns the full-size car in favour of the bloated SUVs...

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    So it's a sleeper. Stealth wealth. I like it. 

     

    As long as there's a thriving market for this kind of thing, I don't think it matters at all who does it.

     

    But it is intriguing how the M division shuns the full-size car in favour of the bloated SUVs...

     

    I've always wondered that as well. My guess is the SUVs make more money.

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    Maybe it's because they're stuck under the rules of being politically correct. One, there's a tuner that actually has a history of making basically a M branded car analogue for the BMW buyer segment, but also how it's perhaps perceived as a step even above M. The flagship in a sense gets even more unique treatment.

     

    Two, again, under the rules of being politically correct... their SUVs are called "Sports Activity Vehicles."

     

    So they're okay with the forgone perceptions of utility as long as they can make SUVs that have truncated roof-lines and more speed juice than is appropriate for a vehicle of that size.

     

    I can see the appeal of the Alpina name paired with BMW because it doesn't appear the same as the M brand's almost corporate playbook for making a souped up version. It's different and it perhaps helps make the flagship appeal well tended to.

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    True. The S65 (is it still called that?) has something like 700+ ft-lbs of torque.

     

    That's a lot. But at some point you get to that point where the acceleration just has to feel effortless (that's how Lincoln will exist!!!). It's more the prestige of having the larger engine to pay more running costs for, not really like anyone hustles either luxo barge.

     

    Otherwise I guess the CT6-V or VSport with the 4.2 V8 will lay waste to any sedan in that segment on a track in terms of lap times.

     

    But I agree, the S-Class despite being one model year older, I feel is the better luxury flagship package than the BMW. However, I think the interior execution is pretty close, and both use a lot of metal switch gear. 

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    The S65 is supposed to get a power increase when they add all wheel drive.   Tobias Moers wants to create a "meaningful power gap" between the AMG V8s and the V12.    The V12 supposedly makes over 800 lb-ft of torque, but the electronically limit it to 738 lb-ft for transmission durability, and to reduce wheel spin.   The S65 does 0-60 in 4.2 seconds, but 60-120 mph in about 8 seconds, the pulling power at highway speed on that thing is just insane.

    Edited by smk4565
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    Like this one?  

    2016-G-CLASS-G65-AMG-SUV-BASE-MH1-D.png

     

    I'm talking about their pickup truck dude.

     

    Yeah that other thing is also pretty rad.

     

    Now if they are going to do a blockbuster resurrection sort of deal for the next-gen like the future Land Rover Defender (which apparently will be nothing like their concept)...

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    So it's a sleeper. Stealth wealth. I like it. 

     

    As long as there's a thriving market for this kind of thing, I don't think it matters at all who does it.

     

    But it is intriguing how the M division shuns the full-size car in favour of the bloated SUVs...

    They had, yes. But two days after this announcment, they unveiled the M760Li xDrive with an M Performance version of the RR Ghost 6.6 L biturbo TwinPower V12. Same torque rating as the Alpina V8, but I'm guessing the "preliminary" 600 hp will turn into 591.8 hp once they convert German to US hp. 0-62 mph is 3.9 s, v. a 0-60 time of 3.6 s for the Alpina (which has 608 German hp, or 599.7 US hp). Expect a weight difference to be partially responsible as well.

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      The leather used for the seats feel quite supple and help fix the issue of uncomfortable seats in the SRX. Interior space has grown, thanks to a two-inch increase in the wheelbase. Rear legroom has grown 3.2 inches and it allows anyone sitting back there to stretch out. Headroom is still slightly tight thanks in part to our tester coming with the optional panoramic sunroof. But this can be alleviated by recalling the rear seat slightly. Cargo space in smack dab in the middle - 30 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 63 cubic feet when folded.
      Cadillac User Interface (CUE) has been one of our least favorite infotainment systems to use since it was introduced a few years ago. The litany of problems ranging from a touch sensitive buttons not responding to inputs to the system crashing have dragged Cadillac down. But the system has been getting a number of changes and updates over the past few years. For starters, Cadillac has removed most of the touch-sensitive buttons from the system. Being able to press an actual button to turn on the heated/ventilated seats or adjust the temperature is really nice. It is a shame Cadillac didn’t bring back an actual volume knob for CUE - the touch-sensitive strip is still there. But at least there are volume controls on the steering wheel that allow you to avoid it. The system itself has been overhauled with a faster processor and a slightly improved interface. The changes make a difference as the system is snappier and a little bit easier to understand. If you still find CUE a bit overwhelming, you’ll be happy to know that CUE now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration.
      Cadillac bucks the trend in the midsize luxury crossover class by only offering one engine - a 3.6L V6 producing 310 horsepower and 271 pound-feet of torque (@ 5,000 rpm). This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The V6 is the weak link in the XT5. When leaving a stop, it takes a moment for the engine to realize the accelerator pedal has been pressed before it starts working. This is even worse when you’re trying to make a pass as it seems the engine was busy taking a nap before it was hastily woken up. Once the engine is awake, it takes its time to get up to speed. There is a positive to the V6 engine and that is the stop-start system. Unlike some previous systems that are slow to restart the engine or do so in a very rough fashion, Cadillac’s system is quick and smooth when you let off the brake. The eight-speed automatic seems reluctant to downshift at times. We’re guessing this transmission was calibrated for fuel economy. At least the eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts.
      Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. 
      One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. 
      An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. 
      In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5.
      It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same.
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: SRX
      Trim: Platinum
      Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700
      Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN
      Base Price: $62,500
      As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00
      20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00
      Trailering Equipment - $575.00
      Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00
      Compact Spare Tire - $350.00
      Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00
      Black Roof Rails - $295.00
      Black Splash Guards - $170.00
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00
    • By William Maley
      As Volvo finishes up the launch of their 90 series lineup, the company's focus will turn to the 40 series lineup. Speaking with Autocar, Volvo's R&D boss Henrik Green revealed the XC40 compact crossover will launch this fall. The model is expected to look somewhat similar to the Concept 40.1 shown last year and utilize the all new CMA platform that was jointly worked on by Volvo and their parent company, Geely. 
      Down the road, Volvo plans on launching other versions of the 40 Series such as a hatchback. 
      Also launching this year is the second-generation XC60. This is an important model for Volvo as it is their most popular model.
      “The XC60 is our biggest-volume car that sells broadly in Europe, China and America. It brings significant profits so is crucial in many aspects. [The new model is] a fantastic car, a big step forward,” said Green.
      Source: Autocar

      View full article
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