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  • Drew Dowdell
    Drew Dowdell

    GM Orion getting $300 Million Upgrade; New Electric Chevrolet

      ...move will bring 400 new jobs to Orion

    GM Announced this morning that the company will be investing $300 million and adding 400 jobs at its Orion Township, Michigan assembly plant.  The investment will go towards facilities to produce a new electric vehicle for the Chevrolet brand.

    The new vehicle will be the second such vehicle, after the Cadillac EV Crossover, to be built on GM's new BEV3 platform, an advance version of the same platform that underpins the Chevrolet Bolt EV.  

    The Orion plant currently builds the Chevrolet Sonic, Chevrolet Bolt EV, and the Cruise AV test vehicles. There are about 880 hourly and 130 salary employees working there.

    Along with the investment announcement for Orion, GM is announcing another $1.8 billion in U.S. manufacturing. This comes on the heels of the closure of the Lordstown assembly plant in Eastern Ohio.  The plant was the subject of a series of tweets by the President in an attempt to get GM to either sell the plant or quickly reopen it.  GM has said that it has 2,700 job openings available for the 2,800 employees that have been displaced by the recent idling of 5 of its facilities

    Source: GM Media



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    GM is doing an outstanding job of how they manage the over capacity and yet have jobs available for those displaced. We are going into crazy times where I think we will see a down sizing of employment jobs at the auto companies.

    Tesla after reviewing their auto ownership has stopped with yearly maintenance and moved to a as needed part replacement plan. I see the move to EV's will do the same for the mechanic and assembly jobs. A reduction is coming and yet with that new options in automated equipment repair and maintenance is upon us.

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