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    Broadside! Nissan Announces A 5.0L Cummins Diesel V8 For Next-Gen Titan



    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    August 21, 2013

    "That's not a knife."

    *Pulls out a bowie knife.*

    "That's a knife."

    Much like Crocodile Dundee, Nissan is using size to their advantage. Engine size that is. At the kickoff of Nissan 360, an industry showcase of Nissan's global product and technology portfolio, the company announced the next-generation Titan pickup would be packing a Cummins 5.0L turbodiesel V8. The V8 is expected to make more than 300 horsepower and well over 500 pound-feet of torque (550 pound-feet is what everybody is guessing).

    “Truck owners told us there's a demand for the performance and torque of a diesel in a capable truck that doesn't require the jump up to a heavy-duty commercial pickup. There is no question that the new Titan will turn heads, and with the available Cummins 5.0L V8 Turbo Diesel, we expect to win new fans and attract buyers looking for this unique configuration," said Fred Diaz, Nissan Sales & Marketing divisional vice president.

    The new engine will be built at Cummins' Columbus Engine Plant, while the Titan will continue to be built at Nissan's Canton, Mississippi plant. No word of when the Titan will be shown or begin production. Our guess, expect a showing sometime next year.

    Source: Nissan

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Press Release is on Page 2


    Nissan to Equip Next-Generation Titan with New Cummins Turbo Diesel Engine

    IRVINE, Calif. – At the kickoff of Nissan 360, an industry showcase of Nissan's global product and technology portfolio, the company announced it will offer a newly-developed Cummins V8 turbo diesel in its next-generation full-size pickup.

    Now in the latter stages of development and testing, the available Cummins 5.0L V8 Turbo Diesel engine has been optimized for the next generation Titan as a result of the partnership between Cummins and Nissan. Cummins also is developing a version of the engine for its commercial vehicle customers.

    "We have done our homework on the next-generation Titan. Truck owners told us there's a demand for the performance and torque of a diesel in a capable truck that doesn't require the jump up to a heavy-duty commercial pickup," said Fred Diaz, divisional vice president, Nissan Sales & Marketing, Service & Parts, Nissan North America. "There is no question that the new Titan will turn heads, and with the available Cummins 5.0L V8 Turbo Diesel, we expect to win new fans and attract buyers looking for this unique configuration."

    Nissan has previously announced the next-generation Titan will add powertrain options and cab-and-box configurations to broaden the appeal of the new truck when it comes to market.

    "We are very excited to partner with Nissan on the introduction of the Cummins 5.0L V8 Turbo Diesel to the North American pickup truck market," said Dave Crompton, vice president, Cummins Engine Business. "This new engine will offer the right balance of power, performance and fuel economy while delivering the dependability that customers expect of a Cummins engine. This will be a great package."

    With a torque rating in the mid-500s (lb-ft) and more than 300 horsepower, the Cummins 5.0L V8 Turbo Diesel will provide light truck customers the combination of towing capacity and mileage that is expected in the highly-competitive North American truck marketplace.

    The Cummins 5.0L V8 Turbo Diesel will be built in America's manufacturing heartland at the Columbus Engine Plant, in Columbus, Ind., Cummins headquarters. This plant has the latest technological innovations to continue the 90-plus year tradition of building the highest quality Cummins engines.

    The Titan program is being led by teams in Nissan Americas' headquarters in Franklin, Tenn., while engineering and testing is performed by Nissan Technical Center North America in Farmington Hills, Mich. and Stanfield, Ariz. as well as Nissan's global engineering center. Design is being led by Nissan Design America in La Jolla, Calif.

    Like the current model, the next-generation Titan will be built at Nissan's Canton, Miss. vehicle assembly plant and its gasoline engines cast, forged and assembled at Nissan's Decherd, Tenn. powertrain plant.

    For competitive reasons, Nissan is not announcing launch dates at this stage in the truck's development, however engineering prototype trucks powered by the Cummins engine are currently undergoing extensive on-public-highway performance and durability testing.

    Further information on the upcoming Titan truck and Cummins engine will be released at a later date.

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    What does GM not get about this? Having a 4.8L Baby Duramax for the Half ton trucks and full size BOF SUV's would be a big sales hit.

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    should fill a niche but Titans even if they update them will be somewhat ignored. The person who is looking for a Titan diesel will be a needle in the haystack. But give credit to Nissan for branching out this way.

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