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    Spying: Next Opel Insignia Makes Its Camo Debut


    • The Next-Generation Opel Insignia Does Its Best Audi A7 Impression

    The next-generation Opel Insignia has been caught for the first time as it ventures out into the real world. We only tell so much from the spy shots since Opel has done a decent job of fitting a fair amount of camouflage to the vehicle. But there is one element we can pull out of the shots. It seems Opel has taken a liking to the Audi A7's styling that they are copying the distinctive roofline for the Insignia.

     

    Along with the A7 inspired roofline, Opel is adding around four inches to the overall length to better compete with the Skoda Superb - a Volkswagen Passat sized model.

     

    Now this brings up an interesting question for the U.S. market. Buick sells the Insignia as the Regal. As Autoblog reports, the next Opel Insignia will only be sold as a five-door and wagon in Europe. Now will this mean Buick will get the five-door or is Opel working a sedan variant? We can't say.

     

    Source: Autoblog

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