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    Porsche Renames Boxster/Cayman to 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman


    • Porsche Brings Back the 718 to the Boxster and Cayman


    Next year will see the introduction of the next-generation Porsche Boxster and Cayman. The new models will also boast new names; the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman.

     

    You might be wondering what the deal is with 718. Porsche didn't just pull this number out of hat. 718 is referencing the 1959 718 racecar with a mid-mounted, four-cylinder engine. When the new Boxster and Cayman are introduced, they will also have a mid-mounted, four-cylinder. But unlike the 718 racecar, the Boxster and Cayman's four-cylinder will be turbocharged.

     

    Porsche says the two models "will share more similarities than ever before," both visually and mechanically. Also, the next-generation Boxster will cost more than the Cayman. Currently, the Cayman is slightly more expensive than the Boxster.

     

    Source: Porsche

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Boxster and Cayman to be branded as 718 model range next year

    • Porsche's mid-engine sports cars to receive new name


    Atlanta, Georgia. The mid-engine sports cars from Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG will be named 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman, respectively, when the models are introduced over the course of 2016. The 718 designation is a reference to the ground-breaking sports car Porsche introduced back in 1957, which achieved great success in a number of renowned car races. The 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman will share more similarities than ever before – both visually and technically. In the future, both will have equally powerful turbocharged flat-four cylinder engines. The Roadster will be positioned at a higher price level than the Coupe – as is the case with the 911 models.

     


    The 718 model range is driven by the four-cylinder concept and the history of distinguished Porsche sports cars. The latest example is the 919 Hybrid LMP1 race car, which is powered by a highly-efficient, turbocharged 2.0 liter four-cylinder engine. This powerplant not only helped Porsche finish first and second in the 24 hours of Le Mans, but it also helped win the manufacturer's and driver's championship titles in the World Endurance Championship (WEC) this year. With these victories, the 919 Hybrid has showcased the performance potential of future sports car engines from Porsche.

     

    History of the 718: flat-four cylinder engine has achieved many racing victories
    Flat-four cylinder engines have a long tradition at Porsche – and they have enjoyed incredible success. In the late 1950s, the 718 – a successor to the legendary Porsche 550 Spyder – represented the highest configuration level of the flat-four cylinder engine. Whether it was at the 12-hour race in Sebring in 1960 or the European Hill Climb Championship which ran between 1958 and 1961, the Porsche 718 prevailed against numerous competitors with its powerful and efficient flat-four cylinder engine. The 718 took first place twice between 1959 and 1960 at the legendary Italian Targa Florio race in Sicily. At the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in 1958, the 718 RSK with its 142-hp four-cylinder engine achieved a significant class victory.

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    They don't need a letter name and a word name.  I think it was fine with Boxster and Cayman.  Unless they wanted to go back to all numbers for cars, like the old 944, 928, 911 days, and you'd have 718 and 911.  But a numeric and a word is a lot for a name.

     

    I think they should bring back the 959 and build cool cars again, not 4-cylinder boxsters an a bunch of SUVs and that fat whale of full size hatch back they make.

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    So Porsche is loosing itself in stupidity of using numbers and names to re-badge the same old crap. Tiny auto's for tiny people.

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    Yeah I also don't understand why numbers and words for their names. 718 and 718 spyder would be fine. But not 718 Cayman and 718 Boxter. I feel like they just added complexity to their naming.  

     

    Looking at Porsche's website, what is the difference between a Boxter and a Boxter Spyder? I thought "spyder" usually just mean it's a convertible? 

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    Looking at Porsche's website, what is the difference between a Boxter and a Boxter Spyder? I thought "spyder" usually just mean it's a convertible? 

     

    Different styles of convertible tops. The Bosxters come with normal soft-tops. The Bosxter Spyders come with this:

     

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    Looking at Porsche's website, what is the difference between a Boxter and a Boxter Spyder? I thought "spyder" usually just mean it's a convertible?

     

    Different styles of convertible tops. The Bosxters come with normal soft-tops. The Bosxter Spyders come with this:

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3Ddq-8HzeI

    Looks like a fancy style soft top still...
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    Looking at Porsche's website, what is the difference between a Boxter and a Boxter Spyder? I thought "spyder" usually just mean it's a convertible?

     

    Different styles of convertible tops. The Bosxters come with normal soft-tops. The Bosxter Spyders come with this:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3Ddq-8HzeI

    Looks like a fancy style soft top still...

    Basically that's all it is, a cooler-looking soft top with a different tonneau cover.

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    The Cayman is my favorite Porsche.  It would be just right for me.  Love to have a green one with reptile grain brown leather interior.  I don't mind the 718 designation, especially after it is explained to be a part of Porsche history.

    Edited by ocnblu
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