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  • Drew Dowdell
    Drew Dowdell

    Armored Volvo XC90 Weighs Nearly 10,000 Pounds

      ...Odjuret is how you said "Beast" in Swedish...

    If you're a diplomat, politician, or evil genius in need of protection when you are out and about, a new option just arrived on your shopping list.  Volvo has just released the XC90 Armored, an SUV that looks normal, but isn't. 

    Volvo worked on the XC90 Armored for about two years, aiming for a protection rating of VPAM VR8, the second highest rating possible.  Decoding that rating, the VR8 means that the XC90 has 360 degree ballistic resistance.  However, it also provides explosive resistance too.  

    Starting off as a standard Volvo XC90 T6 AWD Inscription, the SUV heads to Bremen, Germany to complete the process of armoring.  High-strength steel and glass are added. The additional armoring brings the total weight of the vehicle plus 5 occupants to 9,899 pounds.  With all that weight, Volvo upgrades the brakes and suspension to compensate. 

    Volvo tried to make the XC90 Armored look as close to a standard issue Volvo as possible so as not to draw any attention from the outside. 

    If this odjuret (beast) is too much for you, Volvo also makes a lightly armored version of the XC60.

    volvo-xc90-armored (1).jpgvolvo-xc90-armored (2).jpg

    Source and Image: Volvo



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    With incompetence in Government around the world, an armored auto could become a standard purchase for people, especially executives.

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    10,000 lbs and a 4 cylinder engine?  Yeah, pass on that.  Mercedes has a V12 in their armored car, or a V8 if you aren't in a hurry.

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    If you're driving an armored vehicle, you're not in a hurry. 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 cylnders in a 10,000lb vehicle will be slow. 

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    19 hours ago, ccap41 said:

    If you're driving an armored vehicle, you're not in a hurry. 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 cylnders in a 10,000lb vehicle will be slow. 

    You might be in a hurry if trying to get away from a terrorist attack.

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    8 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    You might be in a hurry if trying to get away from a terrorist attack.

    And you'll still be screwed because of traffic and TEN THOUSAND POUNDS OF VEHICLE. That's what the armor is for. 

    Yeah, more power is more gooder but even with 1000hp you have to try and bring that thing to a halt at some point and speed is your enemy there. Maybe slow and steady is better. I mean you are in an armored vehicle. 

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    32 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

    And you'll still be screwed because of traffic and TEN THOUSAND POUNDS OF VEHICLE. That's what the armor is for. 

    Yeah, more power is more gooder but even with 1000hp you have to try and bring that thing to a halt at some point and speed is your enemy there. Maybe slow and steady is better. I mean you are in an armored vehicle. 

    Larger Brembo 8 piston brakes. ;) 

    Course I could take this the EV route and say Hybrid would be better so you have the instant Torque of electric motors and the regen on braking. 

    I honestly think a 10,000 lb armored auto would be best if a Hybrid. This is the one time an efficient Diesel generator with AWD Electric motors and over sized traditional brakes to support the Regen could really help move these protective Beasts.

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