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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Quick Drive: 2017 Jeep Cherokee Overland

      Almost $44,000 for a Cherokee?!

    One thing Jeep is very good at is providing different variations of their models to fit a buyer’s desire and budget. The Grand Cherokee is an excellent example with seven different models on offer. Jeep is using this same strategy for the Cherokee with seven different trims ranging from the base Sport to luxurious Overland. We spent some time in the Overland to see if a luxury version of the Cherokee makes any sense.

    • The Overland model stands out from other Cherokees as the lower body cladding is painted in the same color as the body. Depending on what color you select, it will either make the Cherokee look good or just a giant blob - the latter being the case for our silver test vehicle. A set of 18-inch polished aluminum wheels come standard and add a nice touch of class.
    • Compared to other Cherokee’s I’ve driven, the Overland does feel a little bit more luxurious. This comes down to some of the appointments used such as cream leather upholstery for the seats and door panels, a texture dash cover finished in brown, and accent stitching. 
    • Overland models get power seats for driver and passenger. This makes it easy to find a comfortable position thanks to the adjustments on offer. Backseat passengers also get their own set of adjustments - reclining, and sliding the seat forward and back. Passengers will have no complaints in terms of space or overall comfort.
    • One area that a fair number of people will complain about is cargo space. The Cherokee is towards the bottom of the class with only 24.6 cubic feet of space behind the rear seats and 54.9 cubic feet when folded. This comes down Jeep making certain compromises to be able to fit all of the off-road hardware to the Cherokee.
    • The 8.4-inch UConnect system fitted to the Cherokee is the previous-generation version. While you do miss out on Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, UConnect still comes with one of easiest interfaces to wrap your head around with large touch buttons and redundant physical shortcut buttons.
    • Powering the Cherokee Overland is a 3.2L V6 with 271 horsepower and 239 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission and Jeep’s Active Drive II 4WD system.
    • With this Cherokee tipping the scales at 4,046 pounds, the V6 is the right engine for the job. It offers enough performance for everyday driving and is one of the most refined engines in the class. The nine-speed automatic provides smooth and quick upshifts. Downshifts are another story as the transmission seems somewhat reluctant whenever merging or making a pass.
    • The Cherokee has some of the worst fuel economy numbers in the class with EPA figures of 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. I was able to eek out 22 MPG during my week of driving in mostly urban areas.
    • Ride comfort is a plus point to the Cherokee as the suspension absorbs most impacts from bumps and other road imperfections. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels.
    • One area that Cherokee does surprisingly well is in handling. Despite its off-road credentials, the Cherokee handles with confidence with a limited amount of body roll. The steering is precise and has some decent weight. Still, the Cherokee lacks the fun element you would find in competitors such as the Mazda CX-5.
    • The Overland trim is quite expensive with a starting price of $38,690 with 4WD. This particular model seen here came with an as-tested price of $43,690 with a few options ticked such as the Active Drive II system, Technology Package (includes adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking, parking assist, and rain-sensing wipers), and a panoramic sunroof. For that kind of cash, you can get into a Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4X4 that offers slightly more power and returns similar fuel economy figures.
    • The Overland is nice a variant of the Cherokee. But there is no way it can justify a price tag of nearly $44,000. If you really want a nice Cherokee, drop down to the Limited and go easy on the options list.

    Disclaimer: Jeep Provided the Cherokee, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2017
    Make: Jeep
    Model: Cherokee
    Trim: Overland
    Engine: 3.2L DOHC 24-Valve V6
    Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, 4WD
    Horsepower @ RPM: 271 @ 6,500
    Torque @ RPM: 239 @ 4,400
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
    Curb Weight: 4,046 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Belvidere, Illinois
    Base Price: $37,695
    As Tested Price: $43,690 (Includes $1,095.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    CommandView Dual-Pane Panoramic Sunroof - $1,755.00
    Technology Group - $1,645.00
    Jeep Active Drive II - $1,205.00
    Heavy Duty Package Group - $295.00

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    It may have the worst fuel economy numbers, but it is also the only one I can think of that comes with a V6 and not a blasted 4-cylinder lagger turbo.  The only other V6 option I can think of is the Journey with its 3.6, but we just won't go there.

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    My son traded his 2012 Jeep Compass in for his GC and was so happy to get rid of the terrible 4 banger as he never got the stated gas mileage. He gets much better with the GC V6.

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    $44k for a Cherokee is a joke, even $38k is too much.  Why not get a Grand Cherokee Limited for $38k and get a few options at that point?  Or if you want a small SUV there are probably 8 better options than a Cherokee.  You could argue the Compass is better than the Cherokee probably and would cost less too.

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