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    Review: 2014 Buick Regal GS AWD


    • Driving With A Black Sheep


    In every automotive manufacturer’s lifecycle, they will at least once build a black sheep. A vehicle which doesn’t quite fit into their lineup, despite how good or bad it is. A perfect example is the Buick Grand National. Taking the Regal Coupe, Buick dropped in a turbocharged V6 which produced anywhere between 200 to 245 horsepower and could smoke a number of performance vehicles in the era. But it didn’t quite fit in with Buick’s smooth-riding, luxury vehicles. Thus it became a black sheep, one that would become legendary in its own right.

    The black sheep phenomenon seems to be making a return to Buick. Along the rows of the luxurious and quiet vehicles sitting on dealer lots, there’s also a vehicle who has those traits along with a bit of performance. It may not wear the Grand National nameplate, but it wears one that possibly has similar value: Regal GS.

    Buick has given the entire Regal lineup some changes for the 2014 model beginning with the exterior. For the Regal GS, those changes include a new front clip with a bigger grille and a new trunk lid. Decked out in red paint and featuring inlet vents that look like vampire fangs, the Regal GS has an outlook of quiet aggression. It doesn’t look like it wants to fight, but if its provoked, the Regal GS will throw down.

    Inside, Buick made some key changes to the Regal GS’ interior There’s a new instrument cluster with a color screen that displays the speedometer and trip computer information. The center stack has been revised with less buttons (thank you), a new climate control system with capacitive touch controls which are hit and miss when your trying to change the temperature or turn on the heated seats; and a larger touchscreen with the latest version of Buick’s Intellilink infotainment system which is easy to use for the most part.

    2014 Buick Regal GS 10

    The interior is trimmed in high quality leather and soft touch materials, along with black trim to accent the sporty image. The front sport seats are very comfortable and are able to keep you in place if you decide to be exuberant with your driving style. The back seat provides very good legroom, while headroom can be tight for taller passengers due to the sloping roofline.

    For impressions on the powertrain and handling, see page 2.


    Previously, the Regal GS produced 270 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque from a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder. For 2014, Buick cut back the horsepower to 259. But in turn, Buick adjusted where maximum torque was available. In this case, they lowered the point. Buick also increased the RPM range of where you have that torque (2,500 to 4,000 rpm if you're wondering). Like before, the Regal GS is available with either a six-speed manual or automatic. However, new for 2014 is the introduction of a all-wheel drive model with a six-speed automatic. The all-wheel drive system can send up 90 percent of power to the rear wheels.

    2014 Buick Regal GS 9

    Like the previous GS, the current model offers three different drive modes. Normal provides a nice balance of efficiency and performance. Sport firms up the suspension, while GS firms up the suspension even further, quickens the shifts of the six-speed transmission, sharpens up the throttle response, and sends 15 percent more torque to the rear wheels.

    I wasn’t sure what to expect when I drove the Regal GS onto one of the roads I use for evaluation. But I can say my jaw was on the floor once I finished driving. Put the Regal GS into the GS mode and it becomes something along the lines of a German sedan. The engine spools up quickly and gets the close to 4,000 pound vehicle moving at a rapid pace. Power is always ready whenever you need it. You also notice the all-wheel drive working, shifting power around to keep the vehicle moving and in control. The six-speed automatic is quick on up or downshifts, though I was wishing for a set of paddles so I could play around with gear selection.

    Then there is the Regal GS’ handling. Drive it into a corner, and the GS hunkers down. There is minimal body roll and the steering provides excellent weight and feel. Agility was very good and felt like you could push the GS a lot further than you thought at first.

    But what happens when you drive the Regal GS day to day? Well, the Regal GS has a much stiffer ride than the standard Regal. Even in the normal mode, the Regal GS does bounce around a little bit more than you'd think. I was thankful I had the standard nineteen-inch wheels and not the optional twenty-inch ones as this would only exacerbate this problem. But the Regal GS does retain Buick’s notion of providing a quiet ride.

    The 2014 Buick Regal GS AWD is an excellent all-weather performance vehicle that could give many competitors, even the Germans a run for their money. But I fear that the Regal GS will go down in history as a black sheep much like the Grand National. Why? Well, Buick lists the Regal GS’ competitors such as the BMW 3-Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class. A tough set of competitors, many people don’t think of Buick as being a competitor to those brands. The other reason is price. A 2014 Regal GS AWD starts at $39,270. My tester rang in at $43,780. A fair price with all of the options on it, but for many, it will likely make their eyes drop out.

    2014 Buick Regal GS 5

    This price problem is further exacerbated by another General Motors model; the Buck Regal Turbo. Both models have the similar engines, choices of drivetrains, and number of other items. The difference is that Turbo costs less than GS. This brings up the question of why buy the GS at all. The best answer I can give is that the GS offers more performance thanks to a number of enhancements under the hood and the suspension.

    If you like being a bit outside the norm, the Regal GS is worth a look.

    Disclaimer: General Motors Provided the Buick Regal GS, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Buick

    Model: Regal

    Trim: GS AWD

    Engine: 2.0L DOHC Turbocharged Four-Cylinder

    Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive

    Horsepower @ RPM: 259 @ 5300

    Torque @ RPM: 295 @ 2500-4000

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/27/22

    Curb Weight: 3,981 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Oshawa, Ontario

    Base Price: $39,270.00

    As Tested Price: $43,780.00 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Driver Confidence Package #2 - $1,695.00

    Sunroof - $1,000.00

    Driver Confidence Package #1 - $900.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Outstanding write up, learned allot. and Love the interior, far better than most cars out there especially the crazy floating look of the Nav found on the German brands.

     

    Question, did they say why they had to drop the HP? Was it due to the AWD system? Do you know if you can reprogram it to capture the additional HP and still get the Torque at the lower RPM level?

     

    I can see this car as getting Tuners excited and after markets building options for it.

     

    Nice Job, Thank you :metal:

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    Question, did they say why they had to drop the HP? Was it due to the AWD system? Do you know if you can reprogram it to capture the additional HP and still get the Torque at the lower RPM level?

     

    Nice Job, Thank you :metal:

     

    Two-fold answer I think: New version of the 2.0L Turbo and a focus on more efficiency. I really think this car could do a bit more power as it could handle it, also give so much needed breathing space between it and the Regal Turbo.

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    Guest Brandon

    Posted

    I owned a 2013 Regal GS with a manual transmission. I love that car. It was simply amazing. I ended up trading it for a crew cab 6.2L sierra, every time I drove it, it turned me into a different person, a speed loving animal, I couldn't get behind the wheel without wanting to drive like I stole it, so I traded for something a little more practical.

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    All seriousness. That is exactly what the Regal needs. 3.6LTT, more precisely: a 2.5L 200hp, 2.0Lturbo 260hp, 3.6L 305HP (GS w AWD), TT3.6L 370HP (w AWD GNX) Wagon, Coupe, and a convertible (same for ATS and CTS, and Verano while we are at it.. and Malibuicon1.png too dang it)

     

    opel_insignia_opc_wagon_11.jpg

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    Question, did they say why they had to drop the HP? Was it due to the AWD system? Do you know if you can reprogram it to capture the additional HP and still get the Torque at the lower RPM level?

     

    I can see this car as getting Tuners excited and after markets building options for it.

     

    Nice Job, Thank you :metal:

     

     

     

    Yes.. The available Haldex AWD system caused them to have to augment the exhaust system creating more back-pressue.. thus the loss of 11 HP. The acceleration of the car was not changed tho, and now it handles as well has most RWD cars I can think of with no torque steer. One could easily tune the 2.0L up to 300HP.. I've seen even more.

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    I think this car should stick with Turbo-4s and not get V6es.  It would ruin the balance the car has.

     

    It's the same reasoning I prefer the ATS 2.0T to the 3.6.

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    I think this car should stick with Turbo-4s and not get V6es.  It would ruin the balance the car has.

     

    It's the same reasoning I prefer the ATS 2.0T to the 3.6.

     

    I still need to get my hands on the ATS 2.0T. I think the 3.6 is ok, but needs more torque on the low end.

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    I owned a 2013 Regal GS with a manual transmission. I love that car. It was simply amazing. I ended up trading it for a crew cab 6.2L sierra, every time I drove it, it turned me into a different person, a speed loving animal, I couldn't get behind the wheel without wanting to drive like I stole it, so I traded for something a little more practical.

     

    100% agreed. I get to drive a lot of incredible new vehicles day to day, but there was a "wow" balance, feel, power, steering, braking, ride, comfort, etc to my GS that I've not had in any other car yet. My G8 GT was the only other car I enjoyed as much, in a different way. The old Turbo 2.0T was fun too, and liked to scream.

     

    Until you've driven this car, you don't understand, and I'm glad I did for almost 2 years even if I rarely did so :thumbsup:

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    Is the 2.0 T the same one that is in the CTS? If so there had to be something wrong with mine as the gas mileage was terrible and even in sport mode, the turbo lag was noticeable and pathetic. Was not impressed.

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    I owned a 2013 Regal GS with a manual transmission. I love that car. It was simply amazing. I ended up trading it for a crew cab 6.2L sierra, every time I drove it, it turned me into a different person, a speed loving animal, I couldn't get behind the wheel without wanting to drive like I stole it, so I traded for something a little more practical.

     

    100% agreed. I get to drive a lot of incredible new vehicles day to day, but there was a "wow" balance, feel, power, steering, braking, ride, comfort, etc to my GS that I've not had in any other car yet. My G8 GT was the only other car I enjoyed as much, in a different way. The old Turbo 2.0T was fun too, and liked to scream.

     

    Until you've driven this car, you don't understand, and I'm glad I did for almost 2 years even if I rarely did so :thumbsup:

     

     

    I only drove it for a week, and get what makes this car special.

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    Too much coin for too little power and interior space.

    I think the power and interior is right on for this category and competition. GM needs to work on the pricing issue. One wonders how much of this auto is really built here compared to importing from Europe which has much higher costs.

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    Very little, if any, comes from Europe.

    So do you think they are just trying to get a bit extra profit for the auto then and if it does not sell well they can say see no one wanted these type of auto's under the Buick name plate.

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    Very little, if any, comes from Europe.

    So do you think they are just trying to get a bit extra profit for the auto then and if it does not sell well they can say see no one wanted these type of auto's under the Buick name plate.

     

     

    The Regal is about quality rather than quantity.  If you're looking for raw speed, this isn't your car. If you're looking for the most cubic feet of passenger room for your dollar, this isn't your car.

     

    The Regal is your car if you want an excellently balanced sedan with plenty of pickup, in a solid and luxurious package, at a price that doesn't break the bank compared to equally equipped competition.

     

    The price premium for the GS trim is a bit excessive in my opinion, but it does get higher end tech not available in the regular Regal.

     

    If it were my money, I'd probably go for a top of the line non-GS.

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    $40k+ for this is almost as bad as $40k+ for a Maxima or Cadenza but at least those are a bit bigger with more room.  For $40k you can get a 3-series, or even an Acura TSX or Lincoln MKZ if you want 2nd rate luxury badge.

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    $40k+ for this is almost as bad as $40k+ for a Maxima or Cadenza but at least those are a bit bigger with more room.  For $40k you can get a 3-series, or even an Acura TSX or Lincoln MKZ if you want 2nd rate luxury badge.

    Yet the statistics show the Maxima and Cadenza to not be as big as the Regal and the 3 series, TSX and MKZ sure do not have the room with only average quality, average materials.

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    $40k+ for this is almost as bad as $40k+ for a Maxima or Cadenza but at least those are a bit bigger with more room.  For $40k you can get a 3-series, or even an Acura TSX or Lincoln MKZ if you want 2nd rate luxury badge.

     

    The Maxima doesn't have the interior niceness. The Cadenza doesn't have the handling nor the solid feel, scratch the surface and you find the underlying Kia cheapness.

    To get all the same equipment as this Regal GS in a BMW 328, you have to spend another $6,000 and you're still down on power.

    The MKZ is junk... there... I said it.

     

    The TLX is the most natural competitor from an equipment and price perspective and it comes with a V6.  It doesn't really float my boat looks wise, but there it is.

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    You know...

     

    Months after selling my 2012 GS back in June, I still miss it. I was thinking the other day if I changed careers and had to buy a car, there were 2 past cars I'd love to have again. Either my G8 GT or the Regal. Oddly enough I started thinking I missed the Regal even more.

     

    The comfort of that car, the performance of that car, the look, the ride/handling/steering sublimeness, the tech features and setup, the seats, it was a total package.

     

    There are SO many sedans out there and I understand when someone ignorantly says "yes but for $40k I could get A, B, C, D...instead", that doesn't mean much. Most of those sedans aren't nearly as nice. I love our new TLX and it has incredible performance and comfort, yet the uniqueness of my '12 GS and even it's previous 2.0T gen, plus the look, the suspension, etc were something special. That car never felt like a FWD something to me, and took corners at full tilt still nothing like most other vehicles I've had. 

     

    Too bad the resale value is terrible, and they don't have high new sales volume, as its a niche product you have to drive and experience more than a day to understand.

     

    Nissans? No. Infiniti? Are you kidding? BMW? Sure, heavy, crazy pricing, lack of features, etc. Audi? Fancy VW, nice bits, but meh. Lincoln? Smoking much?...

     

    This is a great car I wish had more recognition, but being the high end model within the Buick brand, it would always be a struggle.

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      Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. 
      One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. 
      An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. 
      In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5.
      It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same.
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: SRX
      Trim: Platinum
      Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700
      Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN
      Base Price: $62,500
      As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00
      20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00
      Trailering Equipment - $575.00
      Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00
      Compact Spare Tire - $350.00
      Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00
      Black Roof Rails - $295.00
      Black Splash Guards - $170.00
    • By William Maley
      We have been wondering what the next-generation Buick Enclave would look like and now we have a general idea. Automotive News got their hands on some new spy shots showing an Enclave test mule sitting at a gas station. It appears Buick has made the Enclave less bulbous than the current model. The front end features Buick's new waterfall grille that debuted on the LaCrosse and a set of slim headlights. For the back, there's a new set of taillights and dual-exhaust system.
      If the Chevrolet Traverse is anything to go by, the Enclave will get the current 3.6L V6 producing 305 horsepower hooked up to a nine-speed automatic. There is the possibility of a 2.0L turbo-four with 255 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque.
      The next-generation Buick Enclave is expected to debut at the New York Auto Show.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      We have been wondering what the next-generation Buick Enclave would look like and now we have a general idea. Automotive News got their hands on some new spy shots showing an Enclave test mule sitting at a gas station. It appears Buick has made the Enclave less bulbous than the current model. The front end features Buick's new waterfall grille that debuted on the LaCrosse and a set of slim headlights. For the back, there's a new set of taillights and dual-exhaust system.
      If the Chevrolet Traverse is anything to go by, the Enclave will get the current 3.6L V6 producing 305 horsepower hooked up to a nine-speed automatic. There is the possibility of a 2.0L turbo-four with 255 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque.
      The next-generation Buick Enclave is expected to debut at the New York Auto Show.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
      Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears
    • By William Maley
      GM Announces January U.S. Sales, Affirms Positive Outlook
      DETROIT — General Motors (NYSE: GM) U.S. dealers delivered 195,909 cars, trucks and crossovers in January, down 3.8 percent year over year. Retail sales totaled 155,010 units, down 4.9 percent, and the company set a new January record for average transaction prices.
      “In early January, we focused on profitability while key competitors sold down their large stocks of deeply discounted, old-model-year pickups,” said Kurt McNeil, U.S. vice president of Sales Operations. “We gained considerable sales momentum as we rebuilt our mid-size pickup, SUV and compact crossover inventories from very low levels following record-setting December sales.”
      Inventories of most of these products were in the 30 – 50 days’ supply range at the beginning of January.
      January Highlights (vs. Jan. 2016)
      GM estimates that the seasonally adjusted annual selling rate (SAAR) for light vehicles was approximately 17.6 million units. GM’s ATPs, which reflect retail transaction prices after incentives, rose $1,200 per unit to $34,500, a new January record.  GM was the only domestic automaker and one of only two full-line automakers to reduce incentives as a percentage of ATP. GM spending was 12.7 percent, down 0.3 points, and the industry average was 12.3 percent, up 1.3 points. Rental deliveries were down 1 percent. Total fleet sales were up 1 percent on a 12 percent increase in Government deliveries and a 1 percent increase in Commercial sales. GM’s fleet mix was 21 percent of total sales. Small business deliveries were up 4 percent. Chevrolet Retail Sales
      The Cruze, up 22 percent, the Volt, up 56 percent, and the Trax, up 40 percent, had their best-ever January retail sales. Total sales were also January records. Spark deliveries were up 40 percent. Bolt EVs, which were available in California and Oregon during the month, had the fastest days to turn in the industry at 7 days. The Tahoe, up 8 percent, and Suburban, up 11 percent, had their best January retail sales since 2008. The Equinox was up 4 percent. The Colorado was up 9 percent for its best January retail sales since 2005. Total sales were also the highest January since 2005. Sales of the Silverado HD pickup were up 32 percent for the truck’s best January retail sales since 2008. Total HD sales were also the best since 2008. Buick Retail Sales
      Crossover deliveries were up 20 percent, driven by higher Encore sales and the first-ever Envision. Average transaction prices were up 9 percent, four times better than the industry average growth. GMC Retail Sales
      Deliveries of the Acadia were up 15 percent. Sierra deliveries were up 2 percent, for the truck’s best retail January sales since 2002. Average transaction prices were up 7 percent, more than three times better than the industry average growth. Cadillac Retail Sales
      Cadillac sales were up more than 1 percent. Crossover deliveries were up 11 percent, on the strength of the new XT5. Total Escalade deliveries were up 10 percent, driven by 7 percent increase in Escalade ESV retail sales. Average transaction prices were the highest in the brand’s history at $55,300, up about $1,000 year over year. GM Momentum Continues to Grow
      In 2016, GM was the industry’s fastest-growing full-line automaker on a retail sales basis, and Chevrolet has been the fastest-growing full-line brand for two consecutive years on a retail basis. Chevrolet grew retail market share in 2015-2016 by almost one full percentage point, which translates to more than 120,000 incremental sales.
      “Our go-to-market strategy in 2017 is the same as 2016,” McNeil said. “We are focused on strengthening our brands, growing retail sales and share, reducing daily rental deliveries and maintaining our operating discipline.”
      GM is optimistic about the year ahead because the economy is strong and the company’s four brands are dramatically expanding their product offerings in fast-growing crossover segments.
      Industry sales are expected to remain at or near record levels, with higher GM retail sales and market share on a year-over-year basis. GM’s deliveries to daily rental companies are expected to decline as a percentage of total sales for the third year in a row. GM will continue to match production with customer demand. Previously announced plans to reduce passenger car production at plants in Lordstown, Ohio and Lansing, Michigan were implemented at the end of January. GM’s operating discipline will help drive continued improvements in brand health and resale values. During January, IHS Markit said GM had the highest overall loyalty to a manufacturer for the second year in a row. Also, Kelley Blue Book gave seven Chevrolet and GMC vehicles awards for outstanding resale value, more than any other manufacturer. Ten all-new or recently redesigned crossovers are expected to drive GM’s 2017 sales results, including two new compact models, which will compete in the industry’s largest segment. Crossover Launches by Brand
      Chevrolet will have the industry’s broadest and freshest lineup of utility vehicles behind the 238-mile range Bolt EV; the 2018 Equinox, which arrives in showrooms soon; and the all-new Traverse, which arrives this summer. At Buick, crossovers are expected to account for as much as 75 percent of retail deliveries, up from 66 percent in 2016, driven by the Encore, Envision and Enclave. GMC, which has the highest average transaction prices of any non-luxury brand, will launch the all-new 2018 Terrain in late summer. It will complement the redesigned Acadia, which went on sale in late summer 2016. Cadillac will benefit from a full year of production of the new XT5 crossover, which is now the second best-selling vehicle in its segment.
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