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    Review: 2016 Subaru WRX Premium


    • The four-season sport sedan

    All-wheel drive in the sport compact/hot hatch marketplace seems to only be reserved for the upper echelon; the upcoming Ford Focus RS, Subaru WRX STI, Volkswagen Golf R, and the outgoing Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution. Step down one rung and most sport compacts send power to the front wheels. Ask why most automakers don’t add AWD and you might get an answer of it would ruin the balance of the vehicle or it would be too expensive. But one automaker does have AWD in their sport compact and that would be Subaru. Ok, Subaru has AWD in most of their vehicles, so adding AWD to their WRX sedan isn’t a problem. But it does give the WRX a big selling point in a growing class.

     

    The WRX is based on the Impreza, but you wouldn’t know that by looking at the exterior. Subaru has made a number of changes to the exterior to make the WRX seem like its own model. The front end gets a new rectangular grille and a large hood scoop. Around the side are seventeen-inch wheels finished in gray and WRX nameplates on the front fenders. A rear diffuser with quad exhaust tips and a lip spoiler complete the rear. Sadly, the WRX and WRX STI don’t come in a five-door like the last-generation.

     

    2016 Subaru WRX Premium 10


    Move inside and you can tell this is an Impreza. Subaru has tried to dress up the WRX with a flat-bottom steering wheel, sport seats, improved interior materials, and faux carbon fiber trim. But for the $32,855 as-tested price, it looks and feels very spartan. Many fans of the WRX and STI will argue that you don’t buy these cars for the interior, you buy them for the performance. While I can see some validity in that argument, the fact that for the same amount of money as this WRX, you can get into a fully loaded Ford Focus ST or a nicely equipped Volkswagen GTI with much nicer interiors.

     

    There are some positive points to the WRX’s interior. The sport seats have the right amount of bolstering to hold you in place when your playing around and don’t make you feel uncomfortable on long-distance trips. The rear seat provides a decent amount of headroom, but legroom is tight for taller passengers. Subaru has also gotten rid their aftermarket-looking infotainment system for a system that looks more appropriate. The seven-inch touchscreen features Subaru’s Starlink infotainment system that boasts features such as Pandora integration and hands-free text messaging. The combination of quick performance and large touchpoints makes the system one of the easiest in the industry.

     


    2016 Subaru WRX Premium 9



    Under the hood is a turbocharged 2.0L boxer-four with 268 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with Subaru’s well-renown all-wheel drive system and either a six-speed manual (what I had) or Subaru’s Lineartronic CVT. Power comes on a very smooth and linear fashion throughout the rpm band. This is due to the turbo building boost at a quick rate and the wide spread of torque from 2,000 to 5,200 rpm. Also, I like that you can hear the woosh of the turbocharger working.

     

    The six-speed manual is somewhat clunky to use as the shift action feels somewhat limp and you have to make sure you have the lever fully in the position of the gear, otherwise you are not moving. At least, the transmission has a defined pattern so you know where you are in the gear pattern.

     

    In terms of fuel economy, the 2016 WRX with the manual is rated by the EPA at 20 City/27 Highway/23 Combined. My average for the week in the WRX landed around 21.6 MPG. Not great, but I’ll admit I was driving this a little bit hard just to hear the turbo working.

     


    2016 Subaru WRX Premium 5



    Despite not participating in the FIA World Rally Championship (WRC), the WRX retains a lot of that pedigree. Point the WRX down your favorite road and it transforms into a rally car. Body lean has gone away and the all-wheel drive system provides tenacious grip. I pushed the WRX around some tight corners and the car never showed any signs of struggle. More impressive is how the all-wheel drive system keeps the WRX planted on gravel roads. Yes, you can turn the traction and stability control off if you want to live out your fantasy of being a rally driver. Steering is very responsive and provides good feedback of the road.

     

    As for the daily grind, the WRX’s suspension is on the firm side. But it is a small price to pay for the performance you get. Some will complain there is a fair amount of road and wind noise coming into the cabin.

     

    One other item that should be mentioned; Subaru’s EyeSight system which uses stereo cameras to scan the road and feed the data to the adaptive cruise control, forward collision mitigation with automatic braking, and lane-departure warning system is only available on the top Limited trim equipped with the CVT. If you opt for the manual, you don’t have that option. I have reached out to Subaru to find out the reason for this and will update when I get a response.

     

    The 2016 Subaru WRX is an interesting option in the sport compact class. At the moment, it is the only model in the lower echelon of sport compacts that come with all-wheel drive. For some, this is what they want in a sport compact. But the high price tag and spartan interior may have you running towards the Ford Focus ST which offers the same performance level and a nicer interior.

     

    It really comes down to what you are looking for in a sport compact. Personally, I really liked my time in the WRX. But I would likely go for either the base WRX or a lightly optioned Premium to make me feel at ease with the purchasing decision.

     

    Cheers:
    All-Wheel Drive Traction
    Looks that standout
    Turbocharged engine

     

    Jeers:
    Interior still lags behind the competition
    Manual transmission needs to go to finishing school
    High price tag

     

     

    Disclaimer: Subaru Provided the WRX, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

     

    Year: 2016
    Make: Subaru
    Model: WRX
    Trim: Premium
    Engine: 2.0L Twin-Scroll Turbocharged DI Boxer Four-Cylinder
    Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, All-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 268 @ 5,600
    Torque @ RPM: 258 @ 2,500 - 5,200
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/27/23
    Curb Weight: 3,386 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Kanto, Japan
    Base Price: $28,895
    As Tested Price: $32,855 (Includes $795.00 Destination Charge)

     

    Options:
    Navigation + harman/kardon Audio System - $2,100

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    I haven't driven the new WRX, but a stint in the new STI not to long ago left me rather disappointed. The car felt and drove decidedly old-school, and I don't mean that in a good way. No way could I justify the cost of one. I'd like to try the regular WRX out and see if that FA20 improves the feel of the car. The STI felt fine, if it were a 10 year old car.

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    Would it fit a 6'6" tall guy at 300lbs? Probably not.

     

    I have heard from my sons best friend that he was disappointed in the latest round of Subaru's. He is married now with a wife and their first son and he traded in his 6 year old Subaru, I think it was an STI, but his newest car while his wife is happy with the Subaru, he feels it does not have the soul of the older models.

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    after the arms race between subie and mitsu ended, i all but lost interest. the wrx just isnt the pocket rocket of yesteryear. while still commanding a premium for nice examples, id just rather have an 00-06 model subie. heck i even love the wrx transplants they do with the forresters. 

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    • By William Maley
      We're a few years out from the next-generation Subaru WRX and WRX STI. To help tide us over till then, Subaru has unveiled the refreshed 2018 WRX and WRX STI.
      Subaru has made some changes to the exterior, though it may be hard to notice at first since they look like the current model. There are new grilles and a set of larger air intakes. The Limited models of the WRX and WRX STI also get LED headlights that swivel when the steering wheel is turned. Inside, Subaru has both models a bit more bearable to live with thicker glass and added sound insulation to help reduce outside noise. Other improvements include better interior materials and larger infotainment systems for both models.
      Under the skin, both the WRX and STI see tweaks to the chassis and power steering. WRX models equipped with the six-speed manual feature a redesigned synchro design to improve feel and a new clutch that is smoother during gear changes. On STI models, the Driver’s Control Center Differential (DCCD) - vary the amount the torque being distributed - switches to a fully electronically controlled limited-slip differential. (The previous system used a combination of electronic and mechanical bits.) Subaru says the switch to an electronic system for the DCCD makes it smoother and quicker to respond. 
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      Source: Subaru
      Press Release is on Page 2

       
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