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Camino LS6

ATTN. Ocnblu

17 posts in this topic

With my habit of doing project cars, I am feeling the need to do my own body and paint work. The stumbling block for my projects always seems to be dealing with the bodyshop - either they don't get to it, don't get it, or cost way too much.

I'm thinking that the answer may be to do it myself, so I'm looking for any and all input on the subject.

I have a huge commercial compressor, but I need to convert it from 3-phase electric to 220 in order to run it here. There may be another alternative compressor in the mix as well (brand new and never used).

Years ago, my Dad bought a Binks #7 paint gun but I'm not sure where that is now.

I want the paint on my cars to be outstanding, so what do I need, and need to know?

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Well do you have access to a spray both? If so, does it have a filtration system in it? The less particles in the paint will obviously make the sanding process quicker and end result better. What type of spray gun would you use....it's been a while since I've done autobody work, but I prefer gravity guns. Of course make sure your surface area is properly prepped, and when painting, obviously keep a steady motion and I like a nice light coat of paint first, and I usually keep about 6-8 inches aways from the panel while spraying. Depending on how many coats you want, base coat clear coat....you should consider wet sanding every other coat....just to make it smooth as silk....upon finishing all paint and clear coat work...the final wet sand and then polish...and you should have a glass shine.

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El Camino...?

So, you're not restoring your beloved Tercel?

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Well, my dad just painted cars in our redneckish garage... So it doesn't take too much, just make sure to have means of keeping insects out. They seem to like wet paint. :P

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To start with, I want to build a booth which can be taken down and stored when not in use. It will also need to be cheap. I have the room to do this inside the barn and would also fabricate some sort of filtration system.

I guess what I really need is the current prefered equiptment and practices as I haven't messed with painting since I was teenaged. I want to have a grip on this before I get to the 'Camino.

The wagon should be the last one I pay someone else to paint if I can figure this out. The Mothertruck would be my "test run" vehicle with the Camino as the "proof of concept".

Hell, I might even do the Jag if I can't sell it as is.

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The thing to remember is that this has to be a pressurised booth that has proper filtration and ventilation systems. Also temperature controlled and has settings to adjust temperature for curing etc....a set up like this is VERY expensive and the thought of a unit that has these 'Proper' features and is able to fold away seems like a lot more than I think you would want to spend

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The thing to remember is that this has to be a pressurised booth that has proper filtration and ventilation systems. Also temperature controlled and has settings to adjust temperature for curing etc....a set up like this is VERY expensive and the thought of a unit that has these 'Proper' features and is able to fold away seems like a lot more than I think you would want to spend

For now, all of the niceties will have to be approximated. I don't own the building and won't be doing any work for anyone else - so outrageous expenses aren't possible. I will have some sort of heat in the barn, but no specific booth controls. We're talking plasric sheeting and 2x4s here, with a big fan, cheap ductwork and a/c filters. At least that's what I'm thinking.

I do plan on a very high quality respirator though.

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The thing to remember is that this has to be a pressurised booth that has proper filtration and ventilation systems. Also temperature controlled and has settings to adjust temperature for curing etc....a set up like this is VERY expensive and the thought of a unit that has these 'Proper' features and is able to fold away seems like a lot more than I think you would want to spend

Pfft.. You don't need any of that. It just makes things go alot faster. :P
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Camino...I wish you luck with it, and I hope you get good results...keep us posted...

BV....well he did ask what he needs to get "outstanding" results....not orange peel, some fish eyes...and some dead flies in his paint :P

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Camino...I wish you luck with it, and I hope you get good results...keep us posted...

BV....well he did ask what he needs to get "outstanding" results....not orange peel, some fish eyes...and some dead flies in his paint :P

I've done the "driveway" paint job thing (with decent results) but I want this to be a bunch better without a full, permanent booth. I expect a bunch of sanding and polishing time to get the results I'm after without a state-of-the-art booth. And, I'll need to build it myself to as high a standard as I can manage.

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Well it goes without saying, the results depend on the amount of work you're willing to do. The sanding is very annoying and drawn out, especially with my process of sanding inbetween coats. The work, if done right will pay off no matter the way you go about it. I'm sure you could get nice results even using spray paint....but I wouldn't even wanna go there :P

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Seems like you're on the right track with what's been said already, Camino. Practicing first on other projects is a good idea. Good luck with it.
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Lots of good advice. My dad did the makeshift paint booth for one of his cars years ago. The key ingredient in that setup is having a good powerful exhaust fan to pull the dust/overspray out of the booth before it has a chance to settle on your paint job. Affix some of those square carbon filters (like the ones used in central HVAC systems) to catch the particles and eliminate the smell to outsiders - not sure if your neighbors would care, but mine do. I'm sure you already now this, but don't skimp on the respirator. If you haven't painted in a while I'd definitely check out the gun technology that's out there. Many of the newer guns lay the paint down a lot better with minimal overspray.

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Thanks for all of the input- keep it coming!

I have very little direct experience with painting, although I have been around it quite often over the years. Everything that I have had painted has involved at least some prep/disassembly/ re-assembly on my part with lots of questions asked.

What I don't have is an understanding of the current state of the art in equiptment, supplies,paint and techniques. I am on a serious learning curve with this, but I intend to understand it and get it right as I think that I'll be painting quite a few cars in the coming years.

Thanks again to everyone for the help.

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Thanks for all of the input- keep it coming!

I have very little direct experience with painting, although I have been around it quite often over the years. Everything that I have had painted has involved at least some prep/disassembly/ re-assembly on my part with lots of questions asked.

What I don't have is an understanding of the current state of the art in equiptment, supplies,paint and techniques. I am on a serious learning curve with this, but I intend to understand it and get it right as I think that I'll be painting quite a few cars in the coming years.

Thanks again to everyone for the help.

You will defintely want a gun that's HVLP - high volume/low pressure. This will lay down the most paint with the least amount of load on the compressor, resulting in a much more "even" paint job. Usually these guns have the paint cup mounted on the top for gravity feeding. The old bottom-mounted cups use a siphon action that wastes air pressure. Paint guns are like tools and jewelry - more expensive = better. You can probably get a cheaper gun for shooting primer, but go all out on a gun for the color/clear. Another important tip - follow the instructions for cleaning the gun to the letter every time you use it.

The paint my dad uses is a two-part enamel paint made by PPG. You want the paint that's for a separate basecoat/clearcoat - I think it's called Deltron DBU. I believe PPG is the paint that GM uses from the factory (you can give the paint supplier a GM paint number and they'll make it for you). For the paint job, you'll need the paint, reducer, and clear. You mix the paint with the reducer (I think it's a 2:1 reducer/paint ratio, but it depends on the paint) because on its own the paint will not pass through the gun. Ditto for the clear. Usually three coats of color and two to three coats of clear should do the car fine. I'm not sure how to figure out how much paint you need, but for the sake of your car it's better to err on the side of excess. If you run out before the car is done, you'll a) be out of paint at an inopportune time and b) risk having a second batch of paint that's a shade off.

You should also use an epoxy primer that helps "seal" the bodywork underneath, also made by PPG. This, due to the epoxy, is a very hard primer. You can also get a sandable filler primer that could help fill some sanding scratches from your bodywork. Before you start laying down the color, scuff the primer with a 3M Scotch Pad so that the first coat has something to bite into. This is important - if you don't do this you could have a paint job that chips/flakes easily.

As for how to spray the paint, I would say move the gun steadily and smoothly across the panel without stopping. You need to find the fine line between moving the gun too slow and having the paint run, and moving too fast and not laying enought paint down. There isn't anything you could do wrong here that can't be sanded out, and sometimes even if you do everything right you might still get these imprefections. It also depends on the gun, the paint/reducer mixture, and the ambient tempreature. You'll find the knack as you keep painting.

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You will defintely want a gun that's HVLP - high volume/low pressure. This will lay down the most paint with the least amount of load on the compressor, resulting in a much more "even" paint job. Usually these guns have the paint cup mounted on the top for gravity feeding. The old bottom-mounted cups use a siphon action that wastes air pressure. Paint guns are like tools and jewelry - more expensive = better. You can probably get a cheaper gun for shooting primer, but go all out on a gun for the color/clear. Another important tip - follow the instructions for cleaning the gun to the letter every time you use it.

The paint my dad uses is a two-part enamel paint made by PPG. You want the paint that's for a separate basecoat/clearcoat - I think it's called Deltron DBU. I believe PPG is the paint that GM uses from the factory (you can give the paint supplier a GM paint number and they'll make it for you). For the paint job, you'll need the paint, reducer, and clear. You mix the paint with the reducer (I think it's a 2:1 reducer/paint ratio, but it depends on the paint) because on its own the paint will not pass through the gun. Ditto for the clear. Usually three coats of color and two to three coats of clear should do the car fine. I'm not sure how to figure out how much paint you need, but for the sake of your car it's better to err on the side of excess. If you run out before the car is done, you'll a) be out of paint at an inopportune time and b) risk having a second batch of paint that's a shade off.

You should also use an epoxy primer that helps "seal" the bodywork underneath, also made by PPG. This, due to the epoxy, is a very hard primer. You can also get a sandable filler primer that could help fill some sanding scratches from your bodywork. Before you start laying down the color, scuff the primer with a 3M Scotch Pad so that the first coat has something to bite into. This is important - if you don't do this you could have a paint job that chips/flakes easily.

As for how to spray the paint, I would say move the gun steadily and smoothly across the panel without stopping. You need to find the fine line between moving the gun too slow and having the paint run, and moving too fast and not laying enought paint down. There isn't anything you could do wrong here that can't be sanded out, and sometimes even if you do everything right you might still get these imprefections. It also depends on the gun, the paint/reducer mixture, and the ambient tempreature. You'll find the knack as you keep painting.

Thanks Z, that's the kind of specific info I'm looking for!

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