Jump to content
  • Greetings Guest!

    CheersandGears.com was founded in 2001 and is one of the oldest continuously operating automotive forums out there.  Come see why we have users who visit nearly every day for the past 16+ years. Signup is fast and free, or you can opt for a premium subscription to view the site ad-free.

William Maley

NTSB Issues Preliminary Report On Fatal Tesla Autopilot Crash, Mobileye Ends Relationship With Tesla

Recommended Posts

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has issued their preliminary report on the fatal crash involving a Tesla Model S in Autopilot mode and a semi-truck back in May.

 

According to data that was downloaded from the Model S, the vehicle was traveling above the speed limit on the road (74 mph in 65) and that Autopilot was engaged. The speed helps explain how the Model S traveled around 347 feet after making the impact with the trailer - traveling 297 feet before hitting a utility pole, and then going another 50 feet after breaking it.

 

The report doesn't have any analysis of the accident or a possible cause. NTSB says their investigators are still downloading data from the vehicle and looking at information from the scene of the crash. A final report is expected within the next 12 months.

 

Car and Driver reached out for comment from both Tesla and Mobileye - the company that provides Tesla the chips that process the images being captured by Autopilot's cameras. Tesla didn't respond, but a blog post announcing the crash said: "neither Autopilot nor the driver noticed the white side of the tractor trailer against a brightly lit sky, so the brake was not applied."

 

A spokesman for Mobileye told the magazine that their chips aren't designed to flag something like the scenario that played out in the crash.

 

“The design of our system that we provide to Tesla was not . . . it’s not in the spec to make a decision to tell the vehicle to do anything based on that left turn, that lateral turn across the path. Certainly, that’s a situation where we would hope to be able to get to the point where the vehicle can handle that, but it’s not there yet,” said Dan Galves, a Mobileye spokesperson.

 

It should be noted that hours before NTSB released their report, Mobileye announced that it would end its relationship with Tesla once their current contract runs out. The Wall Street Journal reports that disagreements between the two on how the technology was deployed and the fatal crash caused the separation.

 

“I think in a partnership, we need to be there on all aspects of how the technology is being used, and not simply providing technology and not being in control of how it is being used,” said Mobileye Chief Technical Officer Amnon Shashua during a call with analysts.

 

“It’s very important given this accident…that companies would be very transparent about the limitations” of autonomous driving systems, said Shashua.

 

“It’s not enough to tell the driver to be alert but to tell the driver why.”

 

Recently, Mobileye announced a partnership with BMW and Intel in an attempt to get autonomous vehicles on the road by 2021.

 

Source: NTSB, 2, Car and Driver, Wall Street Journal (Subscription Required)


View full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Mobileye realizes the path Tesla has taken could cost them far more than a conservative approach to autopilot driving. Everyone is covering their ass in hoping to avoid big lawsuits.

 

Hopefully this will not delay or stop the development of autonomous auto's. They have their place in society for those that are too timed and stressed out to drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pending investigation, BUT:

 

 

I don't like the precedents being set here, because I still think the driver cannot willfully be stupid and engage autopilot thinking it's an "I WIN" button when it comes to driving a vehicle.

 

At the point an autonomous aid is deployed, the driver is a passenger if they willfully choose to distract themselves. Or was this driver thinking that autopilot would stop on its own? Testing the features when no warning or pre-collision assist warning came off?

 

Also...what about those cars? The ones that fail to deploy even those basic semi-auto features? Why aren't there big headlines and uproars over those?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   1 Member, 0 Anonymous, 4 Guests (See full list)



  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Tesla only has one assembly plant in Fremont, California. But that could be changing in the near future.
      Yesterday, Tesla and the and the Shanghai government reached a preliminary deal for a new assembly plant. The automaker expects production in about three year's time, provided they can get the approvals and permits needed. Tesla says the plant could build up to 500,000 vehicles annually. According to Bloomberg, the plant is expected to build the Model 3 sedan and upcoming Model Y crossover.
      Tesla building a plant in China doesn't come as surprise. The country is the largest market for electric vehicles, and most forecasters believe sales will skyrocket as government regulations push toward a goal of 100 percent electric vehicles by 2030.
      There are some questions about this new factory. For one, how is Tesla going to pay for this new plant? At the end of the first quarter, the company burned through $2.7 billion, mostly due to various issues dealing with ramping up Model 3 production. The Shanghai government said it would help cover some of capital costs.
      The other is will Tesla need to share technologies with a Chinese partner. Currently, any foreign automaker has to enter into a joint venture with a Chinese automaker and transfer various technologies.
      "For technology transfer, it is a matter subject to negotiation between the enterprises," said Huang Ou, deputy head of the Shanghai government’s economy and information technology commission.
      The Chinese government announced back in May that it would scrap the rules for "capping foreign ownership of new-energy vehicle ventures" by 2022.
      Source: Bloomberg, Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Tesla only has one assembly plant in Fremont, California. But that could be changing in the near future.
      Yesterday, Tesla and the and the Shanghai government reached a preliminary deal for a new assembly plant. The automaker expects production in about three year's time, provided they can get the approvals and permits needed. Tesla says the plant could build up to 500,000 vehicles annually. According to Bloomberg, the plant is expected to build the Model 3 sedan and upcoming Model Y crossover.
      Tesla building a plant in China doesn't come as surprise. The country is the largest market for electric vehicles, and most forecasters believe sales will skyrocket as government regulations push toward a goal of 100 percent electric vehicles by 2030.
      There are some questions about this new factory. For one, how is Tesla going to pay for this new plant? At the end of the first quarter, the company burned through $2.7 billion, mostly due to various issues dealing with ramping up Model 3 production. The Shanghai government said it would help cover some of capital costs.
      The other is will Tesla need to share technologies with a Chinese partner. Currently, any foreign automaker has to enter into a joint venture with a Chinese automaker and transfer various technologies.
      "For technology transfer, it is a matter subject to negotiation between the enterprises," said Huang Ou, deputy head of the Shanghai government’s economy and information technology commission.
      The Chinese government announced back in May that it would scrap the rules for "capping foreign ownership of new-energy vehicle ventures" by 2022.
      Source: Bloomberg, Reuters
    • By dfelt
      Gotta love EV owners plates:















    • By William Maley
      Tesla has finally done it. Over the weekend, the company hit their milestone of producing 5,000 Model 3s in a week only a few hours after the deadline set by CEO Elon Musk - the end of the second quarter. Two Tesla factory workers told Reuters that the 5,000th Model 3 cleared final inspection around 5:00 AM PDT.
      “We did it!! We either found a way or, by will and inventiveness, created entirely new solutions that were thought impossible. Intense in tents. Transporting entire production lines across the world in massive cargo planes. Whatever. It worked,” said Tesla CEO Elon Musk in an email to employees.
      “I think we just became a real car company.”
      Reaching this goal was quite hard for the automaker. Numerous delays and production issues caused Tesla to push back production milestones on a seemingly regular basis. The company had to build a makeshift assembly line in a tent within the past month to help bolster production.
      But can Tesla keep up this output? There are concerns they might not be able to do it. According to one worker, Tesla sent employees from other departments to the Model 3 production line to keep it going. This including shutting down parts of the factory such as the Model S production line.
      “Reaching it is one thing,” said  Dave Sullivan, manager of product analysis for AutoPacific Inc to Bloomberg.
      “Consistently producing 5,000 per week with outstanding quality is another.”
      Source: Bloomberg, Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Tesla has finally done it. Over the weekend, the company hit their milestone of producing 5,000 Model 3s in a week only a few hours after the deadline set by CEO Elon Musk - the end of the second quarter. Two Tesla factory workers told Reuters that the 5,000th Model 3 cleared final inspection around 5:00 AM PDT.
      “We did it!! We either found a way or, by will and inventiveness, created entirely new solutions that were thought impossible. Intense in tents. Transporting entire production lines across the world in massive cargo planes. Whatever. It worked,” said Tesla CEO Elon Musk in an email to employees.
      “I think we just became a real car company.”
      Reaching this goal was quite hard for the automaker. Numerous delays and production issues caused Tesla to push back production milestones on a seemingly regular basis. The company had to build a makeshift assembly line in a tent within the past month to help bolster production.
      But can Tesla keep up this output? There are concerns they might not be able to do it. According to one worker, Tesla sent employees from other departments to the Model 3 production line to keep it going. This including shutting down parts of the factory such as the Model S production line.
      “Reaching it is one thing,” said  Dave Sullivan, manager of product analysis for AutoPacific Inc to Bloomberg.
      “Consistently producing 5,000 per week with outstanding quality is another.”
      Source: Bloomberg, Reuters
  • My Clubs

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Reader Rides

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.