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dfelt

January 2017 Car Spotting Thread!

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Howdy all, Welcome to January 2017,

Today I saw someone during Xmas took delivery of their new Tesla X. 

Love the technology, but the design is just so blah to me.

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Saw a new3 Durango with an SRT style hood.  i was passing going the other way so I didn't get too good of a look.  The only reason I mention this is because I have seen SRT vehicles testing here before introduction.  Caught the 11 Challenger SRT8 testing with the 6.4 months before the changes were made public.  So maybe?  more than likely some kind of aftermarket hood, bt I can hold out hope :)

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Yesterday---saw a new Audi R8 in bright orange,  a new NSX in a bright blue, an early '00s NSX-T in a metallic orange w/ the targa top off, a white Aventador, and a red F488 spyder... I guess some supercar owners in Scottsdale decided to drive them on a sunny Friday after a rainy week..    today, I saw a new LaCrosse in a medium red, first of the new ones I've seen...looks great in person. 

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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Auction week is here, saw some oldies that may or may not be related to that...yesterday, I saw a clean yellow '65 Coronet ht in a motel parking lot in downtown Scottsdale, a black late 50s Rolls Royce Phantom, and a yellow early (chrome bumper) Pantera...

today I saw a gorgeous red w/ gold rockers and gold wheels Lamborghini Miura SV in traffic...first I've ever seen that I can recall...what a sound.

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3 Tesla Model-S and one Model-X in my parking garage downtown suddenly.... never saw a cluster like that there before. 

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Brand New Tesla X today, Fit and Finish leaves much to be desired. Check out the door alignment!

20170116_153432.jpg

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Been living and working out of a hotel in Independence, Oh (Cleveland suburb) since Sunday--closed on my house and got my keys yesterday.  Busy, busy.   Some sunny days, some rainy days..snow coming.  

Haven't seen too many interesting cars, except for a black w/ red stripes 6th gen Camaro SS w/ the top up in the rain, and a sharp silver CTS-v coupe in my new neighborhood, parked in a driveway w/ a black '15+ Escalade...

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57 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

Been living and working out of a hotel in Independence, Oh (Cleveland suburb) since Sunday--closed on my house and got my keys yesterday.  Busy, busy.   Some sunny days, some rainy days..snow coming.  

Haven't seen too many interesting cars, except for a black w/ red stripes 6th gen Camaro SS w/ the top up in the rain, and a sharp silver CTS-v coupe in my new neighborhood, parked in a driveway w/ a black '15+ Escalade...

Very Cool, look forward to some pictures of your new digs! :) Congratulations.

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nothing major, just suprising.  A freaking manual Chevette complete with classic car license plate, mint looking Grand Wagoneer and a Dodge/Chevy hybrid pickup complete with smoke stacks and barbed wire lol. 

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On 1/26/2017 at 6:08 PM, dfelt said:

Very Cool, look forward to some pictures of your new digs! :) Congratulations.

My 1967 split level in NE Ohio suburbia.  Loving it so far...

IMG_1607.JPG

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On 1/27/2017 at 6:10 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

In case you wondered what a self driving Volvo XC90 looked like

2017-01-27 14.18.20.jpg

wow, That is really hideous! :puke: 

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1 hour ago, ocnblu said:

PA Auto Show in Harrisburg yesterday.

100_2294.JPG

100_2295.JPG

And your thoughts? Did they have any in the test drive area?

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Not bad.  Not big.  I sat in the passenger front seat (without adjusting it) then got "behind myself".  The rear leg room was OK for me I guess.  Visibility seems good.  I thought it would feel bigger inside.  They had the hatch locked, and no power to the instruments, etc.  There were about 8 ppl around it, which, for a small show, seemed pretty good.  I also sat in a Sonic hatch, Cruze hatch, Trax, and Camaro SS convertible in the Chevy area.

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