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    2016 Detroit Auto Show: 2017 Chevrolet Cruze Hatchback


    • The Cruze Hatchback is real!


    Chevrolet sold different variations of the Cruze around the world, including a hatchback. But you couldn't get it here in the U.S., despite the number of other automakers who offered one. GM's Mark Reuss said in 2013 that it "was a pre-bankruptcy planning mistake.”

     

    But then we got some hope. Last year, we reported that Chevrolet showed a next-generation Cruze Hatchback to its dealers. It was expected that we would see it introduced a year later. Next week at the Detroit, we'll get our first look at the 2017 Cruze Hatchback.

     

    The overall look is a mashup of the new Cruze sedan and Opel/Vauxhall's Astra. The hatchback shape makes the Cruze more practical with 18.5 cubic feet of cargo space behind the rear seats. This increases to 42 cubic feet with the rear seats down.

     

    Chevrolet will only offer the Cruze Hatchback in the LT and Premier trims, but either trim can be optioned with the RS appearance package. Power will come from a turbocharged 1.4L with 153 horsepower and 177 pound-feet of torque. Standard equipment will include Apple Carplay and Android Auto integration through Chevrolet MyLink, blind spot monitoring, rear park assist, lane keep assist, and rear cross traffic alert.

     

    We'll have more on the Cruze Hatchback when it debuts on January 11th. In the meantime, you can follow all 2016 Detroit Auto Show news here.

     

    Source: Chevrolet

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Chevrolet Introduces 2017 Cruze Hatch

     

    HERE’S THE STORY
    Ahead of its debut at the North American International Auto Show, Chevrolet today introduced the 2017 Cruze Hatchback. Developed with all the technologies and dynamic driving attributes of the all-new 2016 Cruze sedan, the new hatch adds a functional and sporty choice for customers. It joins Colorado and Trax as the latest Chevrolets to push into new segments.

     

    PRODUCT DETAILSThe Cruze Hatch has the same, class-leading 106.3-inch (2,700 mm) wheelbase as sedan models, but features a unique roof and rear-end structure – including wraparound taillamps and an integrated spoiler at the top of the liftgate. It opens to offer 18.5 cubic feet (524 liters) of cargo space behind the rear seat. With the rear seat folded, cargo space expands to 42 cubic feet (1,189 liters).
    ON SALE
    Fall 2016

     

    QUOTABLE
    “With 9 percent market growth in small hatchbacks last year, it’s the perfect time to bring the Cruze Hatch to America,” said Alan Batey, president, General Motors North America and Global Chevrolet. “As Cruze continues to set the tone for Chevrolet globally, it articulates the brand promise of offering cars with the latest technologies, more features and greater efficiency, performance and safety with fresh, distinctive styling.”

     

    ABOUT THE NEW CRUZE
    An all-new, more rigid and lighter architecture is the Cruze’s foundation for driving dynamism, while also playing a significant role in safety and efficiency. It is more than 200 pounds (91 kg) lighter than the previous-generation model due largely to a body structure that is 100 pounds lighter and an engine that’s 44 pounds (20 kg) lighter.

     

    The Cruze lineup in North America is offered in L, LS, LT and Premier – and a more expressive RS package, featuring unique front and rear fascias, rocker panels, rear spoiler, fog lamps and – on the Premier model – 18-inch wheels.

     

    The 2017 Cruze Hatch will be offered in LT and Premier trims, and with the RS package.

     

    KEY FEATURES

    • Segment-exclusive standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility via the MyLink radio systems and available 4G LTE with Wi-Fi hotspot
    • More standard safety features than any other compact car – including Corolla and Civic – with available adaptive features including Lane Keep Assist, Rear Cross Traffic Alert, Side Blind Zone Alert and Rear Park Assist
    • Available Teen Driver feature helps support safe driving habits and offers driving statistics for parents
    • Standard 1.4L turbo engine with direct injection and Stop/Start technologies, electric power steering and, on Premier models, a Z-link rear suspension
    • Interior with midsize-level roominess, including two inches greater rear legroom than Ford Focus and Hyundai Elantra
    • Available features include a heated steering wheel, heated front and rear seats, Athens leather-appointed seating surfaces, true French seams and halogen projector-beam headlamps with LED signature lighting.


    FAST FACTS

    • Cruze is Chevrolet’s best-selling car around the world, with 3.5 million sold since it went on sale in 2008
    • Since Cruze’s introduction, Chevrolet’s retail share of the segment has grown from 5.8 to 9.4 percent
    • 35 percent of Cruze customers are new to Chevrolet
    • In the U.S., Cruze is the segment’s second-best seller to customers under 25.

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    I like it, I think it looks better than the Cruze sedan and the added cargo space is nice for people that want versatility and don't want a crossover. The base engine is fine, but you have to have something "Hot" in a hatch. A 250 HP 2 liter turbo would be nice.

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    WOW!  better than the sedan.  I bet too this means we won't ever get a 5 door Buick Astra.

     

    Will this put my other Chevy lease plans on hold?

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    Yup, the Chevy Cruze hatch eats Mazda 3s and farts them out.

     

    I wouldn't go that far, the Mazda 3 is an exceptional compact car, and it offers a strong 2.5L DI 4-cylinder. It's also gorgeous in 5-door form. This Cruze hatch is pretty sweet though. With that new 1.4L turbo, all I can think is throwing a tune on it for an easy 180 hp/200 tq with a stick shift.

    Edited by cp-the-nerd
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    Well there is not a lot of competition in this segment but the ones there are tough.

    Now if all those who cried for a Hatch would step up and buy one GM would have it made.

    At least with the global platform here sales are not just dependent here on the NA market. What we don't sell here the cost will be covered elsewhere. This is a no lose situation.

    I just hope Buick still get a sporty Astra OPC hatch. We need a Golf Killer.

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