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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    L.A. Auto Show: 2014 Ford Fiesta ST


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    November 26, 2012

    After months of speculation, questions, and wild guesses, Ford has unveiled the new Fiesta ST before its offical showing at the 2012 L.A. Auto Show this week.

    Much like the Focus ST, the Fiesta ST will only come in a five-door hatch (sorry, no three-door model for the states). The Fiesta ST makes its presence known to everyone thanks to sportier front fascia with a lower chin spoiler, blacked-out mesh grille, exclusive 17-inch wheels, rear diffuser and dual exhaust outlets, and an available Molten Orange exterior paint color.

    A bit surprising is how much power is under the hood of the Fiesta ST. Ford originally estimated the Fiesta ST to produce 180 HP and 177 lb-ft of torque from a 1.6L EcoBoost turbo-four. Ford is now saying the 1.6L EcoBoost in the ST will produce 197 HP and 214 lb-ft of torque. All of the power will be sent to the front wheels via a six-speed manual transmission.

    Other performance tweaks to the Fiesta ST include modified front control arms, stiffer rear axle, and brake based torque vectoring. There is also a three-mode stability control system which allows a driver to change how much input the stability control is allowed.

    Source: Ford

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Press Release is on Page 2


    Confirmed: Ford to Launch Fiesta ST in North America, Brings Big Speed and Style to the Small Car Market

    -Fiesta ST – a well-known hot hatch born in Europe and now ready for North America – packs a punch with a 1.6-liter EcoBoost® engine producing nearly 200 horsepower

    -New Fiesta ST is Ford's latest vehicle to wear the Sport Technologies badge, a global performance brand that debuted in North America earlier this year with the launch of the Focus ST

    -Exclusively equipped with a six-speed manual transmission, Fiesta ST is expected to be a segment leader in both performance and fuel efficiency

    LOS ANGELES, Nov. 26, 2012 – Small cars continue to be a hot segment in North America and with the new Fiesta ST, introduced here at the 2012 Los Angeles Auto Show, Ford is expected to have the hottest hatch around.

    Fiesta ST, a performance model first launched in Europe back in 2005, is yet another proof point from Ford that small cars are anything but boring. In addition to a precision sport-tuned suspension and an improved braking system, Fiesta ST packs a punch under the hood.

    A new high-output variant of the award-winning 1.6-liter EcoBoost® four-cylinder engine propels Fiesta ST with an estimated 197 horsepower and 214 lb.-ft. of torque. In comparison, Mini Cooper S makes do with 181 horsepower and 177 lb.-ft., while Chevrolet Sonic RS produces just 138 horsepower and 148 lb.-ft.

    Unlike the competition, Fiesta ST doesn't simply look like a performance car; it's got the guts to back it up.

    "This is a rewarding car to rev," says Mark Roberts, Fiesta calibration supervisor. "With 177 lb.-ft. of torque available from just 1,600 rpm and 214 lb.-ft. by 3,500 rpm, Fiesta ST gives the performance and feel of an engine twice its size. There's no waiting at all for the power to just push you back in your seat."

    Fiesta ST may be born with racing DNA, but buyers won't have to pay for that performance at the pump. Available exclusively as a five-door hatchback in North America and with a six-speed manual transmission, Fiesta ST is projected to achieve up to 34 mpg.

    This compact performance machine sports a unique grille and chin spoiler with new rear diffuser and fascia extensions. Bright tipped dual-exhaust pipes and high-mount spoiler along with unique 17-inch wheels complete the visual package: Fiesta ST looks like it's made for the racetrack. The car is first of its nameplate to receive the Molten Orange tri-coat metallic paint.

    Fiesta ST steering is more direct and responsive than the base model. A unique suspension with modified front knuckle makes for a quicker overall steering ratio of 13.6:1.

    The rear axle gets increased roll stiffness to improve stability through fast corners, while the Fiesta ST body sits 15 millimeters closer to the ground than the base model.

    Increased mechanical grip provided by the suspension improvements is further enhanced with electronic Torque Vectoring Control to reduce understeer during hard cornering maneuvers. Three-mode electronic stability control – standard, sport or off – enables the ST driver to select the amount of electronic aid based on current conditions. Overall, Fiesta ST provides enthusiastic drivers with the ideal mix of performance handling and ride comfort.

    Fiesta ST will also sound good on the open road. It features the mechanical version of the sound symposer first used on the Focus ST, which went on sale in North America earlier this year, to provide an enhanced soundtrack for drivers out tackling the open road. It is unique for Fiesta in that for the first time the engine sound is directly fed into the passenger cabin to accentuate feedback quality and response.

    Fiesta ST is the result of the combined efforts of Team RS in Europe and SVT in the United States.

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    Makes the Sonic RS an also-ran suddenly, with all that horsepower and serious hardware upgrades. Chevy's new 1.6t better get here soon, and with comparable power figures.

    Sad no 3-door.

    Edited by ocnblu
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