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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Audi Becomes the Latest To Skip Detroit Auto Show

      Joining alongside BMW and Mercedes-Benz

    The list of automakers skipping the 2019 Detroit Auto Show continues to grow. Automotive News reports that Audi is the latest automaker to skip next year's show. The company wrote in a statement that it "has had a long and successful history at NAIAS, debuting countless models that Audi customers enjoy today. For 2019, we have decided that we will not participate in NAIAS. We will continue to evaluate Auto Shows on a case by case basis relative to the timing of our product introductions and the value the show brings from a media and consumer perspective."

    Just within the past few months, both BMW and Mercedes-Benz have announced they would be no-shows for the 2019 Detroit Auto Show for similar reasons. Other reasons cited by automakers include reallocating money for marketing, not wanting to compete for attention with other automakers, and more competition from other shows such as the Consumer Electronics Show.

    The Detroit Auto Dealers Association, the group who puts on the show is trying their best to lure automakers to the show once again. A spokesman told Automotive News that plans are underway to change up the show and provide automakers "a global stage that delivers cost-effective opportunities to audiences" that "only Detroit" can offer. There is also talk of moving the show to October.

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)



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    No one cares about this show anymore because Detroit is not the center of the automotive world anymore.

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    5 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    No one cares about this show anymore because Detroit is not the center of the automotive world anymore.

    Detroit is not the center of the world is correct, but it is still a very important place for the auto industry in regards to design and building.

    Big point is Detroit is not the Focus of the Marketing World for New Auto Debuts. CES with Vegas is taking that place for the higher tech auto's and places like NY and LA. As product introductions change to other times from what was considered traditional in the past, the best places to be for an auto show are not the older venues.

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    Then what should those responsible for NAIAS do to address this for 2019 and 2020 and beyond?

    I have no idea what they should do either.

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    1 hour ago, riviera74 said:

    Then what should those responsible for NAIAS do to address this for 2019 and 2020 and beyond?

    I have no idea what they should do either.

    I believe Detroit needs to change now not in a year or two, they also need to embrace the technology excitement marketing buzz and make the auto show more like the CES show. They could recapture if they properly change now to embrace what the auto companies are looking for.

    Using the Ford adage of you can have it in any color you want as long as it is Black does not work any longer.

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    3 hours ago, ocnblu said:

    There is a reason some technologies remain on the fringe where they belong.

    So in your mind EV / BEV / Etc. are fringe and have no place in society. WOW, you really do live in the stone age.

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    19 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    So in your mind EV / BEV / Etc. are fringe and have no place in society. WOW, you really do live in the stone age.

    I did not say they have no place.  Their place is... on the fringe.  This is the 21st Century, why are you judging me?

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    34 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    So in your mind EV / BEV / Etc. are fringe and have no place in society. WOW, you really do live in the stone age.

    Remember, it's still 1699 to the Amish..

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    sounds like its too pricey for a lot of the marques.  And i do think moving the show to October may help.  Apart from that though I wonder if having the show in LA or New York makes the most sense from the world stage aspect.

    No offense, but Detroit?  It's time may have passed.....

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    They do have big shows in New York and LA and that is where most of the luxury brands push their new product because they want to do it in front of big city coastal elites.

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    1 hour ago, smk4565 said:

    They do have big shows in New York and LA and that is where most of the luxury brands push their new product because they want to do it in front of big city coastal elites.

    Yup the big money is no longer in Detroit, it is just an average auto show and the key to showing off new stuff and concepts is the coast cities where the money is at.

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