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    William Maley

    Audi Drops Manual Option for 2019 A4 and A5

      Hurry now!

    For a time, you could order an Audi A4 or A5 with a manual transmission at no-cost. But that option will be going away when the 2019 models begin arriving at dealers.

    Car and Driver reports that low demand for the option has Audi pulling off the option sheet. Audi points out that only five percent of U.S. buyers picked an A4 with a manual transmission. The news isn't that surprising as more automakers are dropping them due to low demand and automatic transmissions returning better fuel economy figures.

    If you really want to get your hands on an A4 or A5 manual, you might want to hurry to your nearest Audi dealer. Car and Driver says there is still a sizable amount in inventory.

    Source: Car and Driver



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    Sizable amount of Inventory? :rofl: Checked the 5 washington state dealers.

    Bellevue has 1 

    image.png

    Everyone else has none. Such choices. :P  

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    10 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    Sizable amount of Inventory? :rofl: Checked the 5 washington state dealers.

    Bellevue has 1 

    image.png

    Everyone else has none. Such choices. :P  

    In a 100 mile radius from where i live there are 16 manual A4s and 9 A5s.

    I wonder what are the chances of them being sold, A4 in premium trim doesn't strike me as car a manual driving enthusiast would buy.  

    Edited by ykX

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    1 hour ago, ykX said:

    In a 100 mile radius from where i live there are 16 manual A4s and 9 A5s.

    I wonder what are the chances of them being sold, A4 in premium trim doesn't strike me as car a manual driving enthusiast would buy.  

    Agree, I suspect you will find manual enthusiast looking to pick up a deeply discounted model come the end of this year. I would not be surprised to see 10K plus off to move these auto's as there are so few people who drive a manual now.

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    i think a lot of folks like to drive manuals including me, but unless its a toy car (ie third car) i can't see owning another.  why?  traffic.  TRAFFIC.

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