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    GM Announces A New Global Head For Cadillac



    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    October 9, 2012

    General Motors has made made some big plans for Cadillac that include a possible new flagship sedan, two-seat sports car, and a refreshed lineup.To help put these plans into motion, they have announced a new Global head of Cadillac.

    Today, the company has announced that Robert E. Ferguson will become the Global head of Cadillac starting January 1st. Ferguson will oversee marketing, brand management and advertising for Cadillac in marketplaces around the world.

    "I’m excited to join a talented team during a period of revitalized growth. The opportunity to strengthen and grow Cadillac is ours for the taking. More people in new markets will experience what makes Cadillac one of the industry's most revered brands," said Ferguson in a press release.

    Ferguson has been at GM since 2010 as the vice president for global public policy, the face of GM on Capitol Hill. Before this, Ferguson worked at Public Strategies, a business advisory and strategic communications firm.

    Source: GM

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Press Release is on Page 2


    GM Names Ferguson Cadillac Global Brand Chief

    Exclusive marketing focus to accelerate premium luxury brand's international growth

    DETROIT — General Motors today appointed senior executive Robert E. Ferguson to lead the global growth and development of the company’s iconic Cadillac brand.

    In the newly created position of vice president, global Cadillac, Ferguson will be responsible for marketing, brand management and advertising for Cadillac in markets around the world. The move is effective immediately and he will report directly to GM chairman and CEO Dan Akerson. Responsibility for sales is also expected to transition to Ferguson in the new year.

    “Bob is a proven leader with vision and a will to win at this critical time for Cadillac,” said Akerson. “He brings a deep business and marketing background that has been marked by delivering results at every stop and under every circumstance. The Cadillac brand will hit a higher gear under his watch."

    Ferguson heads Cadillac at a time when GM's premium luxury brand is planning the most extensive round of product launches and upgrades in its history, and is poised to enter new international markets with industry-leading products like the XTS, ATS and SRX.

    "I’m excited to join a talented team during a period of revitalized growth,” said Ferguson. “The opportunity to strengthen and grow Cadillac is ours for the taking. More people in new markets will experience what makes Cadillac one of the industry's most revered brands."

    U.S. vice president for Cadillac marketing Don Butler and U.S. vice president for Cadillac sales and service Chase Hawkins will report to Ferguson as he begins building out his global team.

    Ferguson, 53, joined GM in 2010 and is currently vice president for global public policy. He is credited with helping GM strengthen its position and voice on Capitol Hill, and with its many regulatory agencies, on a wide range of business challenges related to energy, tax, labor and finance policy. In that role, Ferguson has become particularly familiar with GM’s product portfolio and advanced technology plans as the automaker contends with new fuel economy rules and safety regulations.

    Prior to joining GM, Ferguson was at the business advisory and strategic communications firm Public Strategies, where he worked with a diverse and international group of clients as a senior strategist. His work with the firm included providing international relations and crisis counsel to the president of the International Olympic Committee during the period leading up to and during the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, as well as leading strategy around several high-profile and complex financial and merger and acquisition transactions.

    Before joining Public Strategies, Ferguson spent more than 10 years as an executive at AT&T, most recently as the president of state legislative and regulatory affairs. He also gained a depth of experience on the sales side of the business, as group president and CEO of SBC's Enterprise Business Services. In that role, he had responsibility for 10,000 employees — one of the nation’s largest sales and engineering organizations at the time. During his tenure, Ferguson oversaw data services, Internet, long distance and customer service operations and grew revenues of $5 billion and EBIT of $1.9 billion.

    Ferguson's previous responsibilities in Washington will be assumed by Selim Bingol, who will also retain his current communications role and will become vice president, global communications and public policy. Bingol, who also will serve as chairman of the GM Foundation, will continue to report directly to Akerson and remain based in Detroit.

    Bingol, 52, joined GM in March 2010, having served as a senior communications and public affairs strategist for a number of large, international clients across diverse industries. Prior to GM, Bingol was senior vice president, corporate communications at AT&T, during a time of unprecedented growth, merger and acquisition activity, and federal and state regulatory scrutiny.

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    Interesting, not a car person per say, but I do see potential for Cadillac finally having a successful International brand deployement with the ability to deliver on the "Standard of the World" Slogan. Looks like interesting times ahead for GM, just hope they do not forget that we also need to change to alternative fuel options as petrol and Ethanol is not a long term viable option. Time to take the next step. CNG baby. :D

    Wonder if Frack baby Frack will be a positive or negative term in the press?

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    Sir... about that dealership network in the EU.....

    Yes can we take a page from the China play book and get some decent dealerships installed in the EU! :D

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    Ferguson said they are looking at a flagship model, what are they still looking at or considering? All the big boys have one, if you want to play with them you need a super sedan. Another 2-seat sports car? Here comes XLR 2!

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    So an what would the Flagship model be called? I agree they need an XLR 2 also.

    LTS? That's the letter combination they trademarked IIRC...

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    So an what would the Flagship model be called? I agree they need an XLR 2 also.

    LTS? That's the letter combination they trademarked IIRC...

    LTS = Luxury Transport Sedan??????

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    So an what would the Flagship model be called? I agree they need an XLR 2 also.

    LTS? That's the letter combination they trademarked IIRC...

    LTS = Luxury Transport Sedan??????

    Luxury Touring Sedan? Like how DTS was Deville Touring Sedan, STS was Seville Touring Sedan, ATS is A Touring Sedan, CTS is Cadillac Touring Sedan, and XTS is Xtreme Touring Sedan... :)

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    So an what would the Flagship model be called? I agree they need an XLR 2 also.

    LTS? That's the letter combination they trademarked IIRC...

    LTS = Luxury Transport Sedan??????

    Luxury Touring Sedan? Like how DTS was Deville Touring Sedan, STS was Seville Touring Sedan, ATS is A Touring Sedan, CTS is Cadillac Touring Sedan, and XTS is Xtreme Touring Sedan... :)

    Sad that they have lost all creativity in the naming department. :(

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    So an what would the Flagship model be called? I agree they need an XLR 2 also.

    LTS? That's the letter combination they trademarked IIRC...

    LTS = Luxury Transport Sedan??????

    Luxury Touring Sedan? Like how DTS was Deville Touring Sedan, STS was Seville Touring Sedan, ATS is A Touring Sedan, CTS is Cadillac Touring Sedan, and XTS is Xtreme Touring Sedan... :)

    I also figured LTS could stand for Luxury Touring Sedan, but I always thought of CTS as standing for Catera Touring Sedan.

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    I also figured LTS could stand for Luxury Touring Sedan, but I always thought of CTS as standing for Catera Touring Sedan.

    I figure that may have been what it meant when the 1st gen CTS came out, but now a decade later, probably just means 'CTS'...

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    So an what would the Flagship model be called? I agree they need an XLR 2 also.

    LTS? That's the letter combination they trademarked IIRC...

    LTS = Luxury Transport Sedan??????

    Luxury Touring Sedan? Like how DTS was Deville Touring Sedan, STS was Seville Touring Sedan, ATS is A Touring Sedan, CTS is Cadillac Touring Sedan, and XTS is Xtreme Touring Sedan... :)

    I also figured LTS could stand for Luxury Touring Sedan, but I always thought of CTS as standing for Catera Touring Sedan.

    Cadillac denies that vehemently

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    The 3 letter names, IIRC, are not supposed to mean anything. To me, GM tried to tie the entry-level Catera Touring Sedan to the CTS (which was supposed to be the entry-level Cadillac when 1st introduced).

    What I don't like re the names is the lack of logical progression... ATS - to - CTS - to - LTS isn't logical at all, but then again the progression from C-Class to E-Class to S-Class isn't either and it works. Personally, I'd loved if Cadillac's names would have been something like the Series 60, Series 70, and Series 90 from the old days...

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    If I were doing the TLAs from the start, the first letter would have been the segment-designator.... i.e. ATS would be the A-segment Spark-based model, BTS would be the Sonic-based model, what is the ATS now should be CTS (C-segment), what is CTS now should be DTS since it's the D-segment model, XTS should be ETS... with the 'S' ending for sedan, a 'C' ending for coupe or cabrio, and an 'E' ending for wagon/estate. but they've set a precident w/ what the have now.

    Though I really would rather have real Cadillac names....Eldorado, Seville, Biarritz (one of my favorites), DeVille, Fleetwood, Brougham, Calais..

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    Though I really would rather have real Cadillac names....Eldorado, Seville, Biarritz (one of my favorites), DeVille, Fleetwood, Brougham, Calais..

    Cimarron :breakdance:

    Edit: I like how my phone tried to auto correct that to macaroni.

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    Though I really would rather have real Cadillac names....Eldorado, Seville, Biarritz (one of my favorites), DeVille, Fleetwood, Brougham, Calais..

    Cimarron :breakdance:

    Edit: I like how my phone tried to auto correct that to macaroni.

    Don't think I'd want to resurrect that one.

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    The 3 letter names, IIRC, are not supposed to mean anything. To me, GM tried to tie the entry-level Catera Touring Sedan to the CTS (which was supposed to be the entry-level Cadillac when 1st introduced).

    What I don't like re the names is the lack of logical progression... ATS - to - CTS - to - LTS isn't logical at all, but then again the progression from C-Class to E-Class to S-Class isn't either and it works. Personally, I'd loved if Cadillac's names would have been something like the Series 60, Series 70, and Series 90 from the old days...

    Agreed that Series 60, 70, etc would make more sense than just using random letters. I would rather them use Eldorado, LaSalle, and Seville than the alphabet soup names.

    Mercedes uses its names for A-segment, B-segment, C-segment, D/E-segment classifications. S-class is for "Sonderklasse" German for Special Class. SL is for sport lightwight, and SLK sport lightweight Kurz (Kurz is Germand for short). So their names make sense aside from CLS which I think they just made up.

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    Agreed that Series 60, 70, etc would make more sense than just using random letters. I would rather them use Eldorado, LaSalle, and Seville than the alphabet soup names.

    Mercedes uses its names for A-segment, B-segment, C-segment, D/E-segment classifications. S-class is for "Sonderklasse" German for Special Class. SL is for sport lightwight, and SLK sport lightweight Kurz (Kurz is Germand for short). So their names make sense aside from CLS which I think they just made up.

    A-Class is not an a-segment car in any way. It's Golf-sized; B-Series is not fiesta sized either (B-Segment); and the C-CLass is actually a D-segment car. The others seem correct to me. But that's not the point of my reply. The point is that, as for the Cadillac names, I'd use only Escalade (as, rapper car or not, it has built its own brand equity) and Eldorado (heritage FTW!) as 'special' flagships... The more excessive/outrageous/luxurious side of Cadillac if you will...

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    Agreed that Series 60, 70, etc would make more sense than just using random letters. I would rather them use Eldorado, LaSalle, and Seville than the alphabet soup names.

    Mercedes uses its names for A-segment, B-segment, C-segment, D/E-segment classifications. S-class is for "Sonderklasse" German for Special Class. SL is for sport lightwight, and SLK sport lightweight Kurz (Kurz is Germand for short). So their names make sense aside from CLS which I think they just made up.

    A-Class is not an a-segment car in any way. It's Golf-sized; B-Series is not fiesta sized either (B-Segment); and the C-CLass is actually a D-segment car. The others seem correct to me. But that's not the point of my reply. The point is that, as for the Cadillac names, I'd use only Escalade (as, rapper car or not, it has built its own brand equity) and Eldorado (heritage FTW!) as 'special' flagships... The more excessive/outrageous/luxurious side of Cadillac if you will...

    Aside from us die hard car nutz, the real world does not give a rats ass about quality names on quality auto's. Escalade has built it's own reputation and should not be changed. I do think they could build a very nice high end Luxury Eldorado but most never ask or car what the letters stand for and I think Marketing has won in building brand recognition for auto's with short names/numbers to represent a specific auto line.

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      Analysts are mixed on GM's plans.
      "It takes a lot of discipline to shift away from a volume-is-king kind of mentality," she said. "In the end, that's going to make a better GM -- a longer-standing company that's not only more profitable but more relevant," said Rebecca Lindland, a senior analyst with Kelley Blue Book to Automotive News.
      John Murphy, an analyst with Bank of America Merrill Lynch isn't so sure about this plan.
      "It appears that GM's recent decision-making has become much more short-term-focused and, in our opinion, could create challenges for the company in the coming years," Murphy wrote in a report.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
    • By William Maley
      In various reports about Cadillac's upcoming small crossover, we have been calling it the XT3. But recently at Geneva Motor Show, Cadillac president Johan de Nysschen revealed the actual name.
      “A new compact crossover called XT4 will debut in 2018 in the US and subsequently in Europe, with an entirely new series of efficient and powerful engines. Starting with the launch of XT4, a new Cadillac will be brought to market every six months, a total of five carlines in the space of two years,” said de Nysschen.
      It is expected that the XT4 will use the bones of the new Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain. Power will come from a 2.0L turbo-four paired with a nine-speed automatic
      Source: Cadillac

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