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    FCA's Sergio Marchionne Skeptical on Tesla Model 3


    • FCA's CEO isn't sure how Tesla is going to make a profit on the Model 3

    Fiat Chrysler Automobile's CEO Sergio Marchionne is someone who speaks his mind - for better or worse. Speaking with Automotive News Europe, Marchionne expressed his skepticism on the recently unveiled Tesla Model 3, specifically on how they can make a profit.

     

    "I'm am not surprised by the high number of reservations but you have then to build and deliver them and also be profitable," Marchionne said.

     

    The Model 3 is Tesla entry into the mass-market EV segment with a $35,000 pricetag. At the moment, reservations for the new model are nearing 400,000. Marchionne doesn't see how Tesla could make money on it.

     

    But Marchionne went on to say if Tesla's Elon Musk "can show me that the car will be profitable at that price, I will copy the formula, add the Italian design flair and get it to the market within 12 months."

     

    Considering this is the same person who railed against EVs for years, it is a bit of a shock. Asked if he thinks the company is arriving late to the EV party, Marchionne said: “better late than sorry.”

     

    Source: Automotive News Europe (Subscription Required)

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    WOW, Talk about an Idiot. This from a guy who has stolen BILLIONS for the so called revival of Alfa, instrumental to the success of FCA long term rather than reinvest that money into the lines that already exist and bump up quality.

     

    If he really wanted to build an EV he would have done it already like GM rather than wait till everyone else has done it, and then follow along way too late and still loosing.

     

    This guy is not only NOT a car guy, but has NO business sense and the board really needs to kick his lazy ass out.

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    He is an idiot who has no clue.  There is no possible way they could copy any car and get it to market in 12 months.  Let alone something like an electric that takes more development.  When is the last time FCA developed a good car?  The last good car was the 2005 Chrysler 300 and that was in the Daimler era.  

     

    The Fiat 500 had Italian flare, that failed, the 500x was a crossover with Italian flare, it probably the only crossover ever to fail, the Alfa 4C has no sales, the Guilia has long over due and likely over budget and likely won't sell.  Maserati Ghibli was a bust, Fiat 500L a total disaster.  The only hits they have had were the Jeep Cherokee revival and Renegade.  The Grand Cherokee is a success, but was already in place long before Sergio took over.  Dodge Dart is biblically terrible, Avenger dead, no mid-size car at all, Chrysler 200 is sold to rental agencies, and was put on death row 2 years after going on sale.

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