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    Rumorpile: Oshawa To Do Finishing Work On Silverado and Sierra


    • We have a possible idea as to what product Oshawa will be getting

    The tentative agreement between General Motors and Canadian union Unifor has a $400 million investment going to Oshawa for a new product. Unifor President Jerry Dias said at a press briefing yesterday morning that Oshawa would be the only GM plant that will build cars and trucks. Neither side is saying what that product might be.

    But Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail has learned from sources that Oshawa will be handling the final assembly of the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra. Truck bodies from GM's Fort Wayne Assembly in Indiana will travel to Oshawa to have interiors installed and final assembly. The Detroit News reports something similar, although their source says it will only be the Silverado.

    Oshawa has a history of building pickups. For four decades, Oshawa was one of the places where GM built the Silverado and Sierra. But in 2009, GM closed the truck plant due to the recession. 

    The Globe and Mail also reports that production of the XTS has been extended at Oshawa. Analysts believed previously that XTS production would end in 2019.

    Source: The Globe and Mail, The Detroit News

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    The XTS make sense as long as it remains profitable. 

    If it should ever descend to the level of the town car that ended up selling to fleets at a discount then it will disappear fast. 

    The key to the XTS at this point is it is selling in fleet sales and still remains with a viable profit. Not to mention Cadillac would also rather spend money where money is to be made right now on SUV and CUV models. They are like printing money and can not be ignored no matter if you like them or not. 

     

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