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    Transaction Prices Go Up On SUVs, Slow Sales Hit Small Cars


    • SUV Sales Go Up, Small Cars Go Down

    With gas prices making a downward trend, sales of SUVs are making an upward climb. In fact, SUVs, pickups, and crossovers when added together make up half of total volume of sales in April. Now with the increase in SUV sales, prices also went up. Edmunds reports that average transaction prices on SUVs have climbed nine percent when compared to last year.

    Now when something goes up, something must come down. In this case, it happens to be small cars. Edmunds says that the average timeframe to sell a small car has risen from two and half months to three. The increase in the time to sell has also caused the average transaction price to remain flat.

    Source: Edmunds

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    Further proof that without artificial restrictions, Americans will buy what they really want to drive.  I am all for that idea.

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    Wish the gov would realize that people will buy what they want and stop trying to force a green groups agenda on everyone.

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    I definitely buy what I want ... haven't listened to the government or the green groups agenda. ;)

     

     

    Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

    1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve
    "Sometimes solutions aren't so simple" __ Linkin Park __ 'Shadow Of The Day'
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    Further proof that without artificial restrictions, Americans will buy what they really want to drive.  I am all for that idea.

     

    &

     

    Wish the gov would realize that people will buy what they want and stop trying to force a green groups agenda on everyone.

     

    Care to provide examples? The only 'restrictions' were market-driven high fuel prices. 

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    Further proof that without artificial restrictions, Americans will buy what they really want to drive.  I am all for that idea.

     

    &

     

    Wish the gov would realize that people will buy what they want and stop trying to force a green groups agenda on everyone.

     

    Care to provide examples? The only 'restrictions' were market-driven high fuel prices. 

     

    How about we start with the billions given out of tax payers dollars for electric auto's. We could better use that money to pay down debt and rebuild basic infrastructure than give away free electric everything. If the product is built right then the people will buy it and not need incentives.

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    How about we start with the billions given out of tax payers dollars for electric auto's. We could better use that money to pay down debt and rebuild basic infrastructure than give away free electric everything. If the product is built right then the people will buy it and not need incentives.

    You mean the same types of subsidies that go towards CNG and Hydrogen vehicles? 

     

    Also: those 'billions' aren't anything compared to the near $4.8 billion in subsidies that US oil companies receive yearly. 

     

    Your country could've rebuilt $11 billion-worth of infrastructure instead of bailing out GM. 

     

    The federal government's $2.4 billion electric's pledge goes to research, development and encourages local manufacturing. California's rebate program is around $110.2 million, and most other states/provinces count their rebate program pledges in the low million area. That's a drop in the bucket.

     

    Your government isn't forcing anyone to buy anything. They're making electric's more attractive, but you're still free to buy a Durango if you desire. 

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    "BUZZ KILLINGTON", are you new here?  You know very well that CAFE standards are what I am referring to, and it is only going to get worse.

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    "BUZZ KILLINGTON", are you new here?  You know very well that CAFE standards are what I am referring to, and it is only going to get worse.

     

    Fuel economy regulations have been around since Gerald Ford's time and CAFE standards impact an entire automaker's lineup. How can you be opposed to SUV's that exceed 20MPG? 

     

    CAFE doesn't restrict you or anyone from buying any kind of vehicle. Why are you opposed to Americans getting better gas mileage?

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    Don't know there....I have and am still find with buying small cars. Even smalll trucks or vans....

     

    Not that I do not like them big, just don't have the need for them...

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    How about we start with the billions given out of tax payers dollars for electric auto's. We could better use that money to pay down debt and rebuild basic infrastructure than give away free electric everything. If the product is built right then the people will buy it and not need incentives.

    You mean the same types of subsidies that go towards CNG and Hydrogen vehicles? 

     

    Also: those 'billions' aren't anything compared to the near $4.8 billion in subsidies that US oil companies receive yearly. 

     

    Your country could've rebuilt $11 billion-worth of infrastructure instead of bailing out GM. 

     

    The federal government's $2.4 billion electric's pledge goes to research, development and encourages local manufacturing. California's rebate program is around $110.2 million, and most other states/provinces count their rebate program pledges in the low million area. That's a drop in the bucket.

     

    Your government isn't forcing anyone to buy anything. They're making electric's more attractive, but you're still free to buy a Durango if you desire. 

     

    I would agree that the OIL COMPANIES DO NOT need the billions they get from the GOV. I also think all alternative forms could be killed off for tax dollars and let the market decide. I get nothing from the benefits of CNG in WASHINGTON state. For me I sell a product that is better than traditional Petrol. Long term it pays for itself.

     

    When your tall like me, small auto's do not work. So I need my big auto's and the CAFE just needs to go away.

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