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    Scion Prices iA and iM


    • Price Tags for 2016 Scion iA and iM Have Been Announced


    Scion has announced pricing information for their upcoming iA subcompact sedan and iM compact hatchback that will be hitting dealers later this summer.

     

    First up is the iA which begins at $16,495 for the six-speed manual and $17,495 for the six-speed automatic. Prices include a $795 destination charge. Underneath the Scion badges is the Mazda2 sedan which packs a 1.5L four-cylinder producing 106 horsepower and 103 pound-feet of torque.

     

    Need a bit more space? Then you want to look at the iM which is a rebadged version of the Toyota Auris sold in Europe. Pricing starts at $19,255 for the six-speed manual or $19,995 for the CVT. Power will come from a 1.8L four-cylinder with 137 horsepower and 126 pound-feet of torque.

     

    Source: Scion

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Two Scion Models Gearing to Go: All-New 2016 Scion iM and Scion iA Priced to Please

     

    SANTA MONICA, Calif., June 29, 2015 – The next great adventure is well within reach. The all-new 2016 Scion iM hatchback and 2016 Scion iA sedan both deliver versatility and premium features that will fuel drivers’ fun, with outstanding prices to fit their finances too. Both vehicles race into showrooms Sept. 1, 2015.

     

    With an MSRP of $18,460 for the manual transmission and $19,200 for the CVTi-S model, the Scion iM is a fun-to-drive hatchback with the space and technology necessary for impromptu escapes from the daily grind. Its sporty sibling, the Scion iA, is Scion’s first sedan and well-priced at $15,700 for the 6-speed manual transmission and $16,800 for the 6-speed automatic. A $795 delivery, processing and handling fee is not included in the MSRP. With Scion’s no hassle, no haggle Pure Price, the same price posted in the dealership is the price customers pay.

    Scion iM: Space and Spunk for Drivers on the Go
    The iM draws some style inspiration from Scion’s FR-S sports car with the hexagon lower grille, sharp-eyed headlights and side bezels. But this hatchback makes its own unmistakable statement with its dynamic profile, piano black grille treatment, sporty body aero kit and LED daytime running lights. Buyers can turn up visual impact with available colors: Blizzard Pearl, Classic Silver Metallic, Black Sand Pearl, Barcelona Red Metallic, Spring Green Metallic and Electric Storm Blue.

     

    The 137 horsepower 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine uses Valvematic continuously variable valve timing technology to offer a broad torque curve, so the iM feels responsive in all situations. The chassis, with double-wishbone rear suspension and standard 17-inch alloy wheels, is ready to smooth out bumps and curves.

     

    The standard 6-speed stick shift promises an engaging driving experience, while the optional automatic features an intelligent Continuously Variable Transmission with both a Sport Mode and manual shifting capability. Both transmission options hit a sweet spot of performance and efficiency, with an EPA rating of 28 city/37 highway/ 32 combined for the CVTi-S and 27 city/36 highway/31 combined for the manual transmission.

     

    A premium feel at a value comes from the iM’s lengthy list of standard amenities:

    • 60/40 fold-down rear seats and standard cargo cover
    • 7-inch Pioneer Display Audio unit with standard HD Radio and Aha™
    • Rear-view backup camera
    • Real leather-wrapped steering wheel
    • Scion’s first 4.2-inch color TFT multi-information display
    • Dual-zone automatic A/C control
    • Color-keyed heated power-folding exterior mirrors
    • Hill Start Assist

    Scion iA: Athletic and Agile Choice for the Road Ahead
    Scion’s first sedan enters the world with some serious style. The iA cuts a striking profile with daring curves, hexagon lower grille and sophisticated touches, including a piano black bumper treatment, chrome grille surround and chrome tailpipe. The spacious trunk gives it a distinctive look in the segment. The color choices deliver a range of vibrant intensity: Stealth black, Abyss, Graphite, Pulse, Sapphire, Sterling and Frost.

     

    Don’t be fooled by its size, the iA is big in both spirit and technology. The basic ingredients: a high-strength body structure, quick-revving, high-compression 1.5-liter engine with 106 horsepower; choice of 6-speed manual or 6-speed automatic transmissions; and standard 16-inch alloy wheels. The Scion iA zips as it sips with EPA-estimated fuel economy ratings of 33 city/42 highway/37 combined MPG for the automatic version 31 city/ 41 highway/ 35 combined for the manual. A Sport Mode feature is available with the flip of a switch.

     

    The Scion iA re-defines “entry-level” at every turn. The MacPherson strut front suspension and torsion beam rear suspension are tuned for a just-right balance of sporty handling and comfortable ride. Steering and brake system tuning, in particular, received attention befitting of a sports sedan. The Scion iA uses a rigid steering mount, which provides a direct yet light feel also unexpected in low-priced, high-MPG rated models.

     

    Scion’s famous mono-spec strategy brings together standard features to impress:

    • Keyless entry with push-button start
    • Low-speed Pre-collision system
    • Rear-view backup camera
    • 7-inch touch screen multimedia system with voice recognition
    • Tilt and telescopic steering wheel
    • Power exterior mirrors
    • Versatile 60/40 split rear seat back

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    So the Scion iM will be the same base price as a Sonic LTZ 6-speed manual or a nicely equipped LT automatic?

     

     

    Good luck with that.

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    Those both look terrible, the engines sound weak and terrible, and they seem overpriced.  This brand needs closed down.  They don't even build sporty or youthful cars.  Make the Corolla in hatch and coupe body styles, move the FR-S to Toyota (as it is everywhere else in the world), make the tC into a new Celica if they want a fwd sports car and call it a day.

     

    Interestingly I just saw some commentary on how a lot of older seniors are buying Scion, because they are cheap and simple no frills kind of cars and it has Toyota reliability.  And young people aren't buying them as was the target audience because young people want horsepower, touch screens, in car apps and technology, etc.

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    So the Scion iM will be the same base price as a Sonic LTZ 6-speed manual or a nicely equipped LT automatic?

     

     

    Good luck with that.

     

     

    Yep, fire sale coming soon......

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    So the Scion iM will be the same base price as a Sonic LTZ 6-speed manual or a nicely equipped LT automatic?

     

     

    Good luck with that.

    The iM will have Toyota's reliability reputation. I am glad for a Corolla hatchback in the US. 

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    But what would sell better, a Corolla hatchback, or a Scion iM?  What would sell better a Toyota GT86 (or rename to Celica) or a Scion FR-S?  I think the Scion brand makes no sense.  Their products are rebadged Toyotas from other markets that would sell better if they called it a Toyota.

     

    The Mazda 2 didn't sell here, so Scion thinks they can rebadge it and sell it for Mazda 3 money?  This brand should be gone by 2020.

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    So the Scion iM will be the same base price as a Sonic LTZ 6-speed manual or a nicely equipped LT automatic?

     

     

    Good luck with that.

    The iM will have Toyota's reliability reputation. I am glad for a Corolla hatchback in the US. 

     

     

    Is that worth a $4k price increase?

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    These two products answer questions that nobody asked. Perhaps somebody in Toyota really does want Scion to close down, and the best way to do it is to give the brand yesterday's leftovers; plan their failure; and win over the rest of the firm in shutting down the brand once and for all.

     

    Scion is on the brink because of decay that stems from lack of investment. This isn't enough.

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    do they still sell the Xa too?  or is the Xd that is the small piece of turd

     

    That would be the xD and I think it will be shown the door soon.

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      Make: Dodge
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      Trim: SRT Hellcat
      Engine: Supercharged 6.2L HEMI V8
      Driveline: Eight-speed automatic, Rear-wheel drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 707 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 650 @ 4,800
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/22/16
      Curb Weight: 4,570 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario
      Base Price: $65,945
      As Tested Price: $72,820 (Includes $995 Destination Charge and $1,700 Gas Guzzler Tax)
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      Customer Preferred Package 23T - $1,995.00
      20-inch x 9.5-inch Brass Monkey SRT Forged Wheels - $995.00
      275/40ZR20 P Zero Summer Tires - $595.00
      Redline Red Tri-coat Pearl Exterior Paint - $595.00

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    • By William Maley
      Last fall, I had the chance to drive a Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack for a week and fell in love. It was basically an SRT Charger, minus a few items for just under $40,000. This fall, another high-performance Charger came in a week’s stay and it was packing more heat. 707 horsepower to be exact. Yes, I finally got my hands on a Hellcat. What was it like? It was fast, but you want more information than that.
      That 707 horsepower figure comes courtesy from a 6.2L supercharged HEMI V8. Torque is rated at 650 pound-feet.This is backed up by an eight-speed automatic only. If you want a manual, then you’ll need to get the Challenger Hellcat. Trying to explain just how fast the Charger Hellcat is difficult. This is a car that you need to drive or sit in to experience the ferocity of the V8 engine. The best way I can use to describe the Hellcat’s power delivery is engaging warp drive. Step on the accelerator and the supercharger whirrs into life and the V8 produces a roar very few vehicles can dream. Blink and you’ll be at an illegal speed before you know it. Taking turns in the Hellcat is somewhat difficult because of the accelerator. You need to roll on it if you want to do it smoothly. If you step on the accelerator pedal like you would on a standard vehicle, the back will become very loose and the stability control will kick on to get the vehicle straightened out. This is especially important due to the tires fitted to Hellcat, a set of Pirelli P-Zeros. These tires need to be warmed up before they begin to bite the road. The Hellcat will be a regular at the fuel pump with fuel economy figures of 13 City/22 Highway/16 Combined. I got about 14.3 mpg during my week in mostly city driving. Handling? That’s the surprising part as the Charger Hellcat doesn’t embarrass itself. Fitted with an adaptive suspension system, the Charger Hellcat shows little body roll when put into Sport and provides a smooth ride when in comfort. The steering system provides the right amount of feel and heft you want in a performance vehicle.  Bringing a 707 horsepower vehicle to a stop is no easy task, but a set of massive Brembo brakes is up to the task. It brings the Charger Hellcat to a quick halt. The Charger Hellcat looks like your standard SRT Charger with a new front clip and lowered stance. There are some slight differences such as a new hood, 20-inch wheels finished in a dark bronze color, and the requisite Hellcat emblems on the front fenders. Inside, the Hellcat isn’t that much different from the standard Charger aside from the speedometer going 200 mph. It would have been nice if Dodge could have done some sprucing of the interior to not make it feel so dank and dark. A little bit more color on the dash would not be a bad thing. The front seats have extra bolstering to hold you in when you decide to let loose all 707 horsepower or take a turn a bit too fast. As I mentioned in my Ram 1500 Quick Drive last week, the Charger’s UConnect system is beginning to show its age. The interface is still easy to use but is beginning to show signs of aging. Performance isn’t as snappy either as in previous FCA models. Hopefully, the 2017 model is able to get the updated UConnect system that debuted in the Pacifica. The UConnect system in the Charger Hellcat does come with SRT Pages. This allows you to record 0-60, quarter-mile, and reaction times. It also allows you to change various performance settings such as gear changes, suspension, and whether you want the full 707 horsepower or 500. The last one pertains if you happen to have the red key. In terms of pricing, the Charger Hellcat kicks off at $65,495. With options and a $1,700 gas guzzler tax, our tester came to $72,820. Compared to other high-performance sedans, the Hellcat is quite the steal. If it was my money on the line, I would go for the Charger R/T Scat Pack. I get most of the enjoyment of the Hellcat, minus the supercharger whine. But I would have a fair chunk of change that I could spend on hopping it up. But I understand why someone would go for the Charger Hellcat. It is a four-door sedan that provides explosive acceleration and engine note that no other vehicle can dare match. There’s something magical about stepping on the accelerator, being flung back into the seat due to power on tap, and then laughing like a four-year old after what happened. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Charger Hellcat, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      (Author’s Note: That’s a wrap for the 2016 review season. We’ll be back with the first batch of 2017 model year vehicles after New Years. But I will be picking my favorite vehicles I drove this year. Expect to see that before the year comes to a close.)
      Year: 2016
      Make: Dodge
      Model: Charger
      Trim: SRT Hellcat
      Engine: Supercharged 6.2L HEMI V8
      Driveline: Eight-speed automatic, Rear-wheel drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 707 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 650 @ 4,800
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/22/16
      Curb Weight: 4,570 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario
      Base Price: $65,945
      As Tested Price: $72,820 (Includes $995 Destination Charge and $1,700 Gas Guzzler Tax)
      Options:
      Customer Preferred Package 23T - $1,995.00
      20-inch x 9.5-inch Brass Monkey SRT Forged Wheels - $995.00
      275/40ZR20 P Zero Summer Tires - $595.00
      Redline Red Tri-coat Pearl Exterior Paint - $595.00
    • By William Maley
      Like life, reviewing vehicles sometimes mean having a curveball thrown your way. Originally, I was going to be reviewing the Chrysler 200 before its production run would end. Sadly, the 200 was pulled out of Chrysler’s test fleet before I was able to drive. But sometimes, that curveball can be a positive. In this case, a Ram 1500 Laramie Longhorn would take its place. More importantly, it would be equipped with the 3.0L EcoDiesel V6. We like this engine in the Jeep Grand Cherokee. How would it fare in the Ram 1500? Quite well.
      The EcoDiesel V6 in question is a turbocharged 3.0L with 240 horsepower and 420 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission. Our test truck came with four-wheel drive, but you can order the EcoDiesel with two-wheel drive. The EcoDiesel might not have the roar or performance figures of the 5.7L V8 (0-60 takes about 9 seconds for the diesel compared to just a hair over 7 seconds for the V8), but it is a very capable engine. There is a lot of punch on the low end of the rpm band and the engine never feels that it is running out of breath the higher you climb in speed.  You can tell the EcoDiesel is a diesel during start up as it has distinctive clatter. Also, it takes a few seconds for the engine to start up if you let the truck sit for awhile. But once the engine is going, you can’t really tell its a diesel. Whether you’re standing outside or sitting inside, the V6 is quiet and smooth. The eight-speed automatic is one of the best transmissions in the class as it delivers imperceptible gear changes. In terms of towing, the EcoDiesel V6 has a max tow rating of 9,210 pounds (regular cab with 2WD). The crew cab with 4WD drops the max tow rating to 8,610 pounds. This does trail the V8 considerably (max tow rating of 10,640). But the EcoDiesel makes up for this in terms of fuel economy. EPA fuel economy figures stand at 19 City/27 Highway/22 Combined for the EcoDiesel equipped 4WD. Our average for the week was a not too shabby 23.4 mpg. This generation of the Ram 1500 has garnered a reputation for having one of the best rides in the class. We can’t disagree. The coil-spring setup on the rear suspension smooths out bumps and other road imperfections very well.  Our truck also featured the optional air suspension which is more focused on improving the capability of the pickup and not ride comfort. There are five different ride height settings that allow for easier access when getting in and out of a truck to increasing ground clearance when going off-road. The air suspension will also level out the truck if there is a heavy load in the bed or pulling a trailer. The Ram 1500’s exterior look hasn’t really changed much since we reviewed one back in 2014. Up front is a large crosshair grille finished in chrome and large rectangular headlights with LED daytime running lights. The Laramie Longhorn features it own design cues such as two-tone paint finish, 20-inch wheels, and large badges on the front doors telling everyone which model of Ram you happen to be driving. Inside, the Laramie Longhorn is well appointed with real wood trim on the dash and steering wheel, high-quality leather upholstery for the seats, and acres of soft-touch plastics. Some will snicker at the seat pockets that are designed to look saddle bags, complete with a chrome clasp.  Comfort-wise, the Laramie Longhorn’s interior scores very high. The seats provide excellent support for long trips, and no one sitting in the back will be complaining about the lack of head and legroom. One nice touch is all of the seats getting heat as standard equipment, while the front seats get ventilation as well. The UConnect system is beginning to show its age with an interface that is looking somewhat dated and certain tasks taking a few seconds more than previous versions. There is an updated UConnect system that debuted on the 2017 Pacifica with a tweaked interface and quicker performance. Hopefully, this is in the cards for the 2017 Ram 1500. As for pricing, the Laramie Longhorn Crew Cab 4x4 comes with a base price $52,365. With options including the 3.0L EcoDiesel, our as-tested price was $60,060. Sadly this is the new reality for pickup trucks. Many buyers want the luxuries and features found on standard vehicles and are willing to pay for it. The Ram 1500 Laramie Longhorn Crew Cab 4x4 can justify the price for what it offers, but it is still a lot of money to drop. The nice thing about the Ram 1500 is the number of trims on offer. You’ll be able to find a model that should fit your needs and price range. Personally, I would be happy with a Big Horn or Laramie as they would offer everything I would want or need in a truck. But if you want something luxurious with a cowboy twist, you can’t go wrong with Laramie Longhorn. The EcoDiesel is just the cherry on top.   
      Disclaimer: Ram Trucks Provided the 1500, Insurance, and One Tank of Diesel
      Year: 2016
      Make: Ram Trucks
      Model: 1500 Crew Cab
      Trim: Laramie Longhorn
      Engine: 3.0L EcoDiesel V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 240 @ 3,600
      Torque @ RPM: 420 @ 2,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/27/22
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Warren, MI
      Base Price: $52,365
      As Tested Price: $60,060 (Includes $1,195.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      3.0L EcoDiesel V6 - $3,120.00
      4-Corner Air Suspension - $1,695.00
      Wheel to Wheel Side Steps - $600.00
      Convenience Group - $495.00
      Trailer Brake Control - $280.00
      Cold Weather Group - $235.00
      3.92 Rear Axle Ratio - $75.00

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