Jump to content
  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Volvo S60 T8 Polestar Engineered To Be A Rare Bird In the U.S.

      Did we mention it is also the most expensive model available through Care by Volvo?


    During the reveal of the 2018 Volvo S60 last week, it was announced that the S60 T8 Polestar Engineered would be offered in "extremely limited quantities." The automaker wasn't lying as there will be 20 models up for grabs in the U.S. that will be available only through the Care by Volvo app.

    The S60 T8 Polestar Engineered packs 415 horsepower and 494 pound-feet of torque, along with Öhlins suspension, large Brembo brakes, and various interior enhancements.

    It will also be the most the expensive model in the Care by Volvo program, carrying a monthly fee of $1,100 per month. Should be noted that monthly fee does include maintenance and insurance.

    If you're interested in being one of the twenty people to get a S60 T8 Polestar Engineered, you'll need to be quick with your smartphone. Volvo says orders will open tomorrow at Noon eastern time.

    Source: Volvo


    Volvo Car USA Announces On Sale Date, Pricing for S60 T8 Polestar Engineered

    ROCKLEIGH, NJ (June 27, 2018) – Volvo Car USA announced the S60 T8 Polestar Engineered sedan will be available in extremely limited quantity, with only 20 of the 415hp vehicles available in the United States. These will be available for subscription tomorrow, June 28 after noon ET, exclusively through the Care by Volvo app.
     
    Care by Volvo customers can simply choose their S60 T8 Polestar Engineered in app and make all-inclusive, monthly payments that cover insurance, service, and maintenance. The all-inclusive pricing of the S60 T8 Polestar Engineered is $1100 per month before local taxes and registration fees.
     
    Polestar Engineered, developed with Volvo Cars’ electric performance arm Polestar, is a complete offer, applying Polestar’s performance engineering expertise to the car’s wheels, brakes, suspension and engine control unit. The offer reflects Volvo Cars’ and Polestar’s commitment to electrification.
     
    Additional details:

    • S60 T8 eAWD Polestar Engineered
    • Only 20 available in the United States
    • MY19 exclusively available via the Care by Volvo App
    • 415-hp, 494 lb/ft torque Polestar Optimized T8 Plug-In Hybrid Powertrain
    • Polestar Engineered Öhlins Suspension
    • Polestar Engineered Brembo Brakes with Gold Calipers
    • Polestar Engineered Strut Bar
    • Exclusive 19” Forged Alloy

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Hahaha!  20 cars and you have to pay $1,100 a month to subscribe to it?  PASS.  You can get an M3 for less money and blow this thing away.  Or an Alfa Romeo Guilia, or a C43, or C63, etc.  

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    On ‎6‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 7:29 PM, smk4565 said:

    Hahaha!  20 cars and you have to pay $1,100 a month to subscribe to it?  PASS.  You can get an M3 for less money and blow this thing away.  Or an Alfa Romeo Guilia, or a C43, or C63, etc.  

    None of those are AWD hybrids, only the C63 has more torque, none will get better mileage.  This is the Volvo version of a Model 3 dual motor that comes with insurance and maintenance in the monthly payment.  Try getting any of the cars on your list (except the C43, that's not even a valid comparison) for $1,100 a month including insurance. … and still be able to drive in the HOV lanes in California and NY.

    • Like 1
    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    12 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    None of those are AWD hybrids, only the C63 has more torque, none will get better mileage.  This is the Volvo version of a Model 3 dual motor that comes with insurance and maintenance in the monthly payment.  Try getting any of the cars on your list (except the C43, that's not even a valid comparison) for $1,100 a month including insurance. … and still be able to drive in the HOV lanes in California and NY.

    You can lease a C43 or CLA45 and buy a lot of gas and insurance and still be cheaper than this S60.  Or you could get a Tesla Model S for that kind of money.    Plus there are only 20 of these Volvos available for the whole year which makes it about 10 times more rare than an Audi R8.  More rare than an AMG hyper car.  

    Plus I believe the subscriber ida does not work unless it is done as a ride share on autonomous cars. 

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    9 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    You can lease a C43 or CLA45 and buy a lot of gas and insurance and still be cheaper than this S60.  Or you could get a Tesla Model S for that kind of money.    Plus there are only 20 of these Volvos available for the whole year which makes it about 10 times more rare than an Audi R8.  More rare than an AMG hyper car.  

    Plus I believe the subscriber ida does not work unless it is done as a ride share on autonomous cars. 

    You can believe what you like.  All 20 are already sold out. 

    • Upvote 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Back in the spring, I spent some time with two different Volvo 60 series models - the S60 Momentum and V60 Cross Country. I came away impressed with the work Volvo had done, picking Cross Country as my favorite. A couple months back, another 60 series model rolled up for a week long evaluation. This one is very different.
      Unlike most performance wagons that grab a bullhorn and shout for attention, the V60 Polestar goes for a more sedate approach. From afar, it looks like your standard V60. Get closer and you begin to see the small changes such as the lowered ride height, 20-inch grey wheels that cover up the massive gold brake calipers, and the two Polestar badges. Only changes for the interior are the Polestar logo embossed on the front headrests and gold seatbelts. Under the hood is Volvo's T8 powertrain. This is the 2.0L twin-charged four-cylinder paired with an electric motor on the rear axle to produce a total output of 415 horsepower and 494 pound-feet of torque. This setup also provides all-wheel drive. It is quite shocking (pardon the pun) as to how fast the V60 Polestar goes. Step on the accelerator and it feels like you have engaged warp drive as the two powertrains work together.  But there were times where the gas engine and electric motor didn't seem to be on the same page. There would be the odd delay or surging of the gas engine when driving around town in the hybrid mode. Hopefully, this is something that could be addressed with an update to the engine software. The other party trick of the V60 Polestar is the ability to run on electric power alone. This comes from an 11.6 kWh lithium-ion battery pack underneath the cargo floor. Volvo claims a range of 22 miles on electric power alone, but I was able to stretch it out to around 23 to 25 miles throughout the week. Recharging took around eight to eleven hours if the battery was near or fully depleted.  For the week, I saw an MPGe average of 52.1. With the battery drained, I saw the average fall to around 29.1 MPG.  Volvo turned to suspension supplier Öhlins to develop something bespoke for the V60 Polestar. What was delivered is a special set of dampers that are manually adjusted by gold-colored aluminum knobs. You'll easily find the ones in the front by opening the hood - sitting on top of the shock towers. The ones in the back are slightly harder to find as they're located above the wheels in the wheel housing. This is something that feels like more of a talking point when showing off the wagon, not something you want to mess with unless you are knowledgeable on damper tuning. The V60 Polestar may be the best handling Volvo I have driven in quite some time. The Öhlins dampers do make a difference as they minimize body roll. But the dampers cannot fully hide the massive weight of the Polestar - tipping the scales at 4,522 pounds. This makes the wagon not feel as nimble. In terms of ride quality, the V60 Polestar does well on smooth roads. Take it on a road with a litany of bumps and potholes and the ride becomes very choppy. This is where I wished Volvo had gone for a computer-controlled damper system to make the ride slightly smoother. A price tag of over $68,000 is a bit much for a Volvo, but you need to take into consideration that you're getting everything as standard. That includes the premium B&O audio system, full LED headlights, Nappa leather upholstery, heated/ventilated front seats, Pilot Assist, and more. The only option on our tester is the metallic paint. Despite the price tag and rough ride, I'm happy to see Volvo venturing out and doing some wild as the V60 Polestar. This vehicle is a prime example of having your cake and eating it by delivering excellent performance and efficiency in one package. The fact that this package is in a wagon shows this for someone who doesn't want to follow the Joneses and get a performance crossover. Would this be the 60 Series model I would buy? No, that honor falls to the V60 Cross Country I drove in the early spring. But the Polestar runs a close second. Disclaimer: Volvo Provided the V60 Polestar, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Volvo
      Model: V60
      Trim: T8 Polestar Engineered 
      Engine: 2.0L Twincharged DOHC 16-Valve Four-Cylinder, Two AC Electric Motors
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 328 (gas), 46 (electric motor front), 87 (electric motor rear), 415 (combined)
      Torque @ RPM: 317 (gas), 111 (electric motor front), 177 (electric motor rear), 494 (combined)
      Fuel Economy: Combined MPGe/Gas - 69/30
      Curb Weight: 4,522 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Gothenburg, Sweden
      Base Price: $67,300
      As Tested Price: $68,940 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Metallic Paint - $645.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Back in the spring, I spent some time with two different Volvo 60 series models - the S60 Momentum and V60 Cross Country. I came away impressed with the work Volvo had done, picking Cross Country as my favorite. A couple months back, another 60 series model rolled up for a week long evaluation. This one is very different.
      Unlike most performance wagons that grab a bullhorn and shout for attention, the V60 Polestar goes for a more sedate approach. From afar, it looks like your standard V60. Get closer and you begin to see the small changes such as the lowered ride height, 20-inch grey wheels that cover up the massive gold brake calipers, and the two Polestar badges. Only changes for the interior are the Polestar logo embossed on the front headrests and gold seatbelts. Under the hood is Volvo's T8 powertrain. This is the 2.0L twin-charged four-cylinder paired with an electric motor on the rear axle to produce a total output of 415 horsepower and 494 pound-feet of torque. This setup also provides all-wheel drive. It is quite shocking (pardon the pun) as to how fast the V60 Polestar goes. Step on the accelerator and it feels like you have engaged warp drive as the two powertrains work together.  But there were times where the gas engine and electric motor didn't seem to be on the same page. There would be the odd delay or surging of the gas engine when driving around town in the hybrid mode. Hopefully, this is something that could be addressed with an update to the engine software. The other party trick of the V60 Polestar is the ability to run on electric power alone. This comes from an 11.6 kWh lithium-ion battery pack underneath the cargo floor. Volvo claims a range of 22 miles on electric power alone, but I was able to stretch it out to around 23 to 25 miles throughout the week. Recharging took around eight to eleven hours if the battery was near or fully depleted.  For the week, I saw an MPGe average of 52.1. With the battery drained, I saw the average fall to around 29.1 MPG.  Volvo turned to suspension supplier Öhlins to develop something bespoke for the V60 Polestar. What was delivered is a special set of dampers that are manually adjusted by gold-colored aluminum knobs. You'll easily find the ones in the front by opening the hood - sitting on top of the shock towers. The ones in the back are slightly harder to find as they're located above the wheels in the wheel housing. This is something that feels like more of a talking point when showing off the wagon, not something you want to mess with unless you are knowledgeable on damper tuning. The V60 Polestar may be the best handling Volvo I have driven in quite some time. The Öhlins dampers do make a difference as they minimize body roll. But the dampers cannot fully hide the massive weight of the Polestar - tipping the scales at 4,522 pounds. This makes the wagon not feel as nimble. In terms of ride quality, the V60 Polestar does well on smooth roads. Take it on a road with a litany of bumps and potholes and the ride becomes very choppy. This is where I wished Volvo had gone for a computer-controlled damper system to make the ride slightly smoother. A price tag of over $68,000 is a bit much for a Volvo, but you need to take into consideration that you're getting everything as standard. That includes the premium B&O audio system, full LED headlights, Nappa leather upholstery, heated/ventilated front seats, Pilot Assist, and more. The only option on our tester is the metallic paint. Despite the price tag and rough ride, I'm happy to see Volvo venturing out and doing some wild as the V60 Polestar. This vehicle is a prime example of having your cake and eating it by delivering excellent performance and efficiency in one package. The fact that this package is in a wagon shows this for someone who doesn't want to follow the Joneses and get a performance crossover. Would this be the 60 Series model I would buy? No, that honor falls to the V60 Cross Country I drove in the early spring. But the Polestar runs a close second. Disclaimer: Volvo Provided the V60 Polestar, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Volvo
      Model: V60
      Trim: T8 Polestar Engineered 
      Engine: 2.0L Twincharged DOHC 16-Valve Four-Cylinder, Two AC Electric Motors
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 328 (gas), 46 (electric motor front), 87 (electric motor rear), 415 (combined)
      Torque @ RPM: 317 (gas), 111 (electric motor front), 177 (electric motor rear), 494 (combined)
      Fuel Economy: Combined MPGe/Gas - 69/30
      Curb Weight: 4,522 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Gothenburg, Sweden
      Base Price: $67,300
      As Tested Price: $68,940 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Metallic Paint - $645.00
    • By William Maley
      Next up for an interactive review is the most expensive Volvo I have driven, the 2020 XC90 T8 Inscription - as-tested price of $86,790 with a $995.00 destination charge. Sadly, there is no kitchen sink to find, but this vehicle is loaded. It has four-corner air suspension, 21-inch wheels, a Bowers and Wilkins audio system, massaging front seats, heated steering whee, captain chairs for the second row with heat, panoramic sunroof, and 360-degree camera.
      Power comes from the T8 plug-in hybrid powertrain that I tried in the V60 Polestar a few weeks back. While not as potent as the Polestar, the XC90 still posts some impressive numbers of 400 horsepower and 472 pound-feet.
      Here are some initial impressions
      Despite the hefty pricetag, I don't get the feeling of luxury that the Inscription is supposed to bring. I have to wonder if its due to the black leather and dark wood trim being used. Did I mention that this comes with a crystal gearshift? Ride quality seems to be ok with the 21-inch wheels, but there is a fair amount of tire noise on rough pavement. I'll have more thoughts as the week goes on. In the meantime, if you have any questions, drop them below.

    • By William Maley
      Next up for an interactive review is the most expensive Volvo I have driven, the 2020 XC90 T8 Inscription - as-tested price of $86,790 with a $995.00 destination charge. Sadly, there is no kitchen sink to find, but this vehicle is loaded. It has four-corner air suspension, 21-inch wheels, a Bowers and Wilkins audio system, massaging front seats, heated steering whee, captain chairs for the second row with heat, panoramic sunroof, and 360-degree camera.
      Power comes from the T8 plug-in hybrid powertrain that I tried in the V60 Polestar a few weeks back. While not as potent as the Polestar, the XC90 still posts some impressive numbers of 400 horsepower and 472 pound-feet.
      Here are some initial impressions
      Despite the hefty pricetag, I don't get the feeling of luxury that the Inscription is supposed to bring. I have to wonder if its due to the black leather and dark wood trim being used. Did I mention that this comes with a crystal gearshift? Ride quality seems to be ok with the 21-inch wheels, but there is a fair amount of tire noise on rough pavement. I'll have more thoughts as the week goes on. In the meantime, if you have any questions, drop them below.


      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Taking the place of the Genesis G70 this week in the C&G Detroit Bureau is the 2020 Volvo V60 T8 Polestar. Aside from the long name, this Volvo gives us our first chance to check out the T8 powertrain. In Volvo terms, this is a 2.0L four-cylinder that comes super and turbocharged, and boasts two electric motors. This gives a total of 415 horsepower and 494 pound-feet of torque. It also gives the wagon an electric only range of 22 miles - something I'll be checking out once I get the battery fully charged.
      Pricing on this wagon comes in at an as-tested price of $68,940.
      Some first impressions below,
      This powertrain pulls the V60 along like a train. Being a Polestar Engineered model, the V60 comes with adjustable Ohlins Dampers and a stiffer front strut bar. I can't comfirm its handling characteristics yet, but can say ride quality is a bit on the rough side. Gold seatbelts. I'll have a bit more to talk about as the week goes on with the V60 Polestar, so stay tuned. Also, drop a question or two on this speedy Swede.


      View full article
  • Posts

    • Yeah...that would be a personal opinion.  I like both equally.  But no matter which one you think is better looking, you cannot deny that the other is NOT not good looking.               
    • Lots of Italians, Sicilians, and Greeks in Steubenville, Ohio where I spent my childhood.  Our next door neighbors had immigrated from Palermo.   
    • Yes.  Along with a few remote villages in Sicily, some remote villages on the heel of the peninsula have retained modified forms of Greek.  Probably because they're even closer to the Peloponnesus.  Greek (this brings back memories): "Ohi" means "no," but "Ne" means "yes"  My favorite Greek surname:  Papadiamantis, also the name of the main street on the island of Skiathos Italian and Greek: I know of only one word that is common to both Italian and Greek:  pantofoli (bedroom slippers), thought there are surely others Sicilian and French: The 200 years of French Norman rule is seen in the Sicilian dialect, where some words come from French, like some of the ones in the video: where:  "unni" from "ou" work:  "travagghiu" from "travail" buy:  "accattari" from "acheter" and many, many more Sicilian and Italian (per video): Most words in Sicilian use "u" sounds for the "o" sounds in Italian, which makes it sound more guttural... that's the biggest difference. I have rarely heard cheese called "tumazzu," as in the video.  Most people just call it "furmaggiu." But they didn't include one of the most humorous differences of them all:  snail:  "lumaca" (in Italian), but "babbaluccia" (in Sicilian) (bubb-a-looch-cha)!
    • @trinacriabob       I was listening to those clips above and others a few weeks back. I was shocked to see that in some parts of Southern Italy, Greek is spoken still and mixed with Italian.   I knew that about Sicily, but not on mainland Italy.   I was even shocked to learn, this was yesterday, that a classic 1980 Giannis Poulopoulos song was but a cover. An Italian cover. From 1974.  And there is a catch, the song was written and sung by a very popular Italian singer, but the song was written and sung...in Greek.     Original  Mia Martini   Una faccia, una razza!  http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yDqhw4Vhh-I/Tvr6TfymTmI/AAAAAAAABiw/ia8Zwy4TxDI/s1600/ItaliaGreciaBandiere.jpg    
  • Social Stream

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 25ThTA
      25ThTA
      (38 years old)
    2. DenCo
      DenCo
      (37 years old)
  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • My Clubs

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...