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    Review: 2013 Lexus LS 600h L


    • This or a House?


    Author's Note: With 2013 coming to a close in a couple of weeks, we've decided to clear out the remaining 2013 vehicle reviews this week. Everyday a new review will appear on the front page. If you miss one day, don't worry, we'll have links to the previous reviews just below. -WM

    Monday: Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV

    Tuesday: Toyota RAV4 XLE AWD

    Wednesday: Hyundai Santa Fe Limited AWD

    Thursday: Toyota Land Cruiser

    Toyota's hybrid lineup here in the U.S. covers both extremes. On one end is the Toyota Prius c, the cheapest and most fuel efficient hybrid model in the lineup. On the other end is the Lexus LS 600h L, the pinnacle of Toyota and Lexus engineering. Here is a model that is the most powerful hybrid that is on sale and the most expensive one as well. The 2013 LS 600h L starts off at $119,910. Let's dive into an alternate reality and figure out whether or not LS 600h L is worth the coin or not.

    2013 saw Lexus giving the LS lineup a bit of a facelift to make it look more dynamic. Up front, the now common spindle grille has been fitted and features a metal slat insert with chrome trim running along the outer edge. A new set of LED headlights sit on either side of the grille. The side profile retains the greenhouse as seen on the 2006 model, but now features chrome trim along the sills and a set of nineteen-inch wheels. The back end gets a bit of a nip and tuck, along with a set of LED lights.

    2013 Lexus LS600h L 2

    Now the L in the LS 600h L means that this model is a long-wheelbase. A standard LS has a length of 200 inches and rides on a wheelbase of 116.9 inches. The LS 600h L has a length of 205 inches and rides on a wheelbase of 121.7 inches, increases of 5 and 4.8 inches respectively. The only way you can tell that you're looking at the long-wheelbase LS besides parking it next to a standard LS is looking at the longer rear door.

    The LS 600h L's interior is a lesson in how to build one that is very luxurious and elegant. Materials are all high-quality choices ranging from cream leather on the seats and dash to real wood trim along the door panels and dash board. The front seats have to be the most comfortable I have ever sat in with the balance between comfort and firmness being just right. There are a number of adjustments available via the sixteen-way power seat and power adjustable seatbelt to make yourself fit right in.

    The center stack features a high-resolution 12.3 inch screen and houses Lexus' Enform infotainment system. Much like the GS 350 F-Sport I drove earlier this year, the LS 600h L's screen is divided into two parts. The majority of the screen is dedicated to navigation, media, climate, and trip information. The remaining part is dedicated to what's playing and climate. I really like this setup and hope more automakers who put bigger screens into vehicles consider this. What I don't like about the infotainment system is Lexus' Remote Touch. As I have said before in the RX 350 and GS 350 reviews, the system is good in theory, but in the real world it falls flat. The joystick controller is finicky to use, and you have to pay close attention to make sure the cursor is over the item you want and not something else. On the move, the problems are exacerbated since you have to take your eyes off the road to make sure you are going into the selection you want. There is some hope though as Lexus revealed a new Remote Touch system in the upcoming RC coupe that features a touchpad and not a joystick. I can only hope that this version makes its way into other Lexus vehicles.

    2013 Lexus LS600h L 14

    If you think the front is impressive, you haven't seen what's in store for the back seat passengers. For starters, the extra length gives you loads of legroom to stretch out and relax. This particular tester came equipped with the Executive-Class Seating Package. For the asking price of $7,555.00 , the LS 600h L becomes a vehicle you want to be driven in and not drive. This package nets you the following:

    • Adjustable Rear Seats (Backseat passenger gets an ottoman)
    • Heated, Cooled, and Massaging Seats
    • Blu-Ray Entertainment system
    • Controls for media and climate control system
    • Electric Sun Shades
    • Pop-Up Table
    • Cool Box

    With this package, it's a fight of who gets to sit back here. Anyone can find a comfortable position in the back thanks to the number of adjustments on offer. The ottoman is more of a gimmick than something you'll actually use since there isn't enough space to fully have it up, even with the front passenger seat moved all the way forward. Other features such as the sun shades and blue-ray player are nice and make the experience of riding in this car magical.

    2013 Lexus LS600h L 13

    Your Seat is Waiting

    See the next page for powertrain and driving impressions.


    Under the hood of the LS 600h L is the most powerful version of Lexus' Hybrid Synergy Drive system. A 5.0L V8 engine with 389 horsepower and 385 pound-feet of torque is paired with a 165 kW electric motor. Total output stands at 438 horsepower. A Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) battery pack provides the power to the electric motor. Lexus employs a CVT to get the power down to all four wheels.

    Despite the LS 600h L weighing 5,202 pounds, the powertrain is more than capable of getting this off the line quickly. As I was told at the launch of the 2013 LS, the hybrid powertrain has the power delivery of a V12 engine and I can attest that it does. Power comes on very smooth and effortless. If you decide to floor the pedal, you're rewarded with the LS 600h L moving like a bat of out of hell. As for the CVT, it is very smooth and unobtrusive. For a few times, I thought I was driving an automatic and not a CVT. The only giveaway that you are driving a CVT is the pitch of the transmission getting louder and louder if you floor the pedal.

    2013 Lexus LS600h L 11

    Being a hybrid vehicle, you would expect amazing fuel economy coming from this big sedan. But in the case of the the LS 600h L, that isn't true at all. The EPA rates the 2013 LS 600h L at 19 City/23 Highway/20 Combined. To put that into perspective, the the 2013 LS 460 L with AWD is rated at 16 City/23 Highway/18 Combined. Not that much improvement compared to the standard gas model. Somehow I was able to get an average of 22 MPG for the week.

    Ride and handling duties are done with an air suspension and Lexus' Drive Mode Selector. For the LS 600h L, you have the choice of six different modes:

    • Normal: Standard throttle mapping and suspension tuning, gearshifts tuned for comfort.
    • Comfort: Softens Suspension Tuning
    • Eco: Slower throttle mapping, reduced operation of the climate control
    • EV Mode: Allows a vehicle to travel on electric power for a short distance
    • Sport: Quicker throttle mapping, stiffer suspension tuning
    • Sport+: Much quicker throttle mapping, even stiffer suspension tuning, heavier steering, number of powertrain enhancements

    Now I only tried Sport and Sport+ briefly in the LS 600h L and wondered why these setting were even put in. There is a noticeable difference in the stiffness of the suspension and throttle response, but trying to push around a vehicle that has an overall length of 205 inches isn't a good idea at all. The passengers in the back seat who are getting flung around would agree with this.

    2013 Lexus LS600h L 15

    Where's the Rinse Cycle?

    Instead, I found myself switching between Normal, Comfort, and Eco for the week and being surprised at how comfortable this vehicle can be. In Normal or Eco, the air suspension isolates bumps and kinks on the road. In Comfort, the suspension takes that a step further, proving a ride that feels like you're driving on glass. Wind and road noise in the cabin are non-existent.

    As for the LS 600h L's steering, it has a surprising amount of weight and feel. I was expecting the steering to be light and have no feel. Not so in the LS and I appreciated that very much.

    After spending a week in the alternate-reality field of the LS 600h L, I have come to this conclusion: most reviews of the LS 600h L focus on the hybrid part and say that for fuel economy improvements the hybrid system offers, the LS 600h L doesn't make any real sense and you would better off with the standard LS 460 L or a competitor. I would agree with this, but I think the LS 600h L needs to be looked in a different light. The LS 600h L wasn't built for to be driven in. It was built for those who want be driven and not have everyone notice you. That's where the LS 600h L succeeds.

    I just wonder how many people who fit this classification exist.

    2013 Lexus LS600h L 7

    Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the LS 600h L, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2013

    Make: Lexus

    Model: LS 600h L

    Trim: N/A

    Engine: Lexus Hybrid Synergy Drive: 5.0L 32-Valve V8 with VVT-iE, 650 Volt Electric Motor, Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) Battery Pack

    Driveline: All-Wheel Drive, CVT

    Horsepower @ RPM: (Gas) 389 @ 6,400; (Electric) 221 @ 0; (Combined) 434

    Torque @ RPM: (Gas) 385 @ 4,000

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/23/20

    Curb Weight: 5,202 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Tahara, Aichi, Japan

    Base Price: $119,110.00

    As Tested Price: $135,029.00 (Includes $895.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Executive-Class Seating Package - $7,555.00

    Advance Pre-Collision System - $6,500.00

    Trunk Mat - $105.00

    Cargo Net - $64.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    The last Lexus LS I drove had overboosted steering, so it sounds like they fixed that. This type of car is not my cup of tea, but I'd take one over a big Benz or BMW.

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    Nice write up, Bill hit the nail right on when he said this is a car for those that want to be driven around in, not for the driver.

    With that said, I am sure based on the pictures that the fit, finish, and quality is there, but the car is just blah to look at and the interior dash to me looks like a warp back in time. I know this is aimed at the conservative business person who gets driven around in but still I was left unimpressed.

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      TOYOTA  U.S. SALES SUMMARY
      JANUARY 2017
        -- CURRENT MONTH --
      -- CALENDAR YEAR TO DATE --     
                          2017
      2016
      DSR %
      VOL %
      2017
      2016
      DSR %
      VOL %
      TOTAL TOYOTA
      143,048
      161,283
      -11.3
      -11.3
      143,048
      161,283
      -11.3
      -11.3
      TOTAL TOYOTA DIV
      127,476
      140,350
      -9.2
      -9.2
      127,476
      140,350
      -9.2
      -9.2
      TOTAL LEXUS
      15,572
      20,933
      -25.6
      -25.6
      15,572
      20,933
      -25.6
      -25.6
                        YARIS IA (INCL SCI IA)
      1,951
      1,840
      6
      6
      1,951
      1,840
      6
      6
      YARIS LIFTBACK
      1330
      548
      142.7
      142.7
      1,330
      548
      142.7
      142.7
      TOTAL YARIS
      3,281
      2,388
      37.4
      37.4
      3,281
      2,388
      37.4
      37.4
      iQ
      0
      2
      -100
      -100
      0
      2
      -100
      -100
      xD
      0
      3
      -100
      -100
      0
      3
      -100
      -100
      xB
      0
      782
      -100
      -100
      0
      782
      -100
      -100
      tC
      72
      715
      -89.9
      -89.9
      72
      715
      -89.9
      -89.9
      COROLLA IM (INCL SCI IM)
      1,460
      1,250
      16.8
      16.8
      1,460
      1,250
      16.8
      16.8
      COROLLA SEDAN
      20,107
      22,362
      -10.1
      -10.1
      20,107
      22,362
      -10.1
      -10.1
      TOTAL COROLLA
      21,567
      23,612
      -8.7
      -8.7
      21,567
      23,612
      -8.7
      -8.7
      86 (INCL FR-S)
      474
      507
      -6.5
      -6.5
      474
      507
      -6.5
      -6.5
      MIRAI
      83
      26
      219.2
      219.2
      83
      26
      219.2
      219.2
      AVALON
      2,503
      3,597
      -30.4
      -30.4
      2,503
      3,597
      -30.4
      -30.4
      PRIUS
      7,829
      9,311
      -15.9
      -15.9
      7,829
      9,311
      -15.9
      -15.9
      CAMRY
      20,313
      26,848
      -24.3
      -24.3
      20,313
      26,848
      -24.3
      -24.3
      TOTAL TOYOTA DIV. CAR
      56,122
      67,791
      -17.2
      -17.2
      56,122
      67,791
      -17.2
      -17.2
                        CT
      393
      622
      -36.8
      -36.8
      393
      622
      -36.8
      -36.8
      IS
      1,423
      2,178
      -34.7
      -34.7
      1,423
      2,178
      -34.7
      -34.7
      RC
      447
      755
      -40.8
      -40.8
      447
      755
      -40.8
      -40.8
      ES
      2,171
      3,400
      -36.1
      -36.1
      2,171
      3,400
      -36.1
      -36.1
      GS
      422
      1,298
      -67.5
      -67.5
      422
      1,298
      -67.5
      -67.5
      LS
      280
      397
      -29.5
      -29.5
      280
      397
      -29.5
      -29.5
      LFA
      0
      1
      -100
      -100
      0
      1
      -100
      -100
      TOTAL LEXUS CAR
      5,136
      8,651
      -40.6
      -40.6
      5,136
      8,651
      -40.6
      -40.6
      TOTAL TOYOTA CAR
      61,258
      76,442
      -19.9
      -19.9
      61,258
      76,442
      -19.9
      -19.9
                        SIENNA
      7,285
      10,992
      -33.7
      -33.7
      7,285
      10,992
      -33.7
      -33.7
      RAV4
      22,155
      21,554
      2.8
      2.8
      22,155
      21,554
      2.8
      2.8
      FJ CRUISER
      0
      1
      -100
      -100
      0
      1
      -100
      -100
      VENZA
      4
      184
      -97.8
      -97.8
      4
      184
      -97.8
      -97.8
      HIGHLANDER
      12,656
      11,258
      12.4
      12.4
      12,656
      11,258
      12.4
      12.4
      4RUNNER
      8,699
      7,496
      16
      16
      8,699
      7,496
      16
      16
      SEQUOIA
      1146
      852
      34.5
      34.5
      1,146
      852
      34.5
      34.5
      LAND CRUISER
      272
      273
      -0.4
      -0.4
      272
      273
      -0.4
      -0.4
      TOTAL TOYOTA DIV. SUV
      44,932
      41,618
      8
      8
      44,932
      41,618
      8
      8
                        TACOMA
      12,509
      12,717
      -1.6
      -1.6
      12,509
      12,717
      -1.6
      -1.6
      TUNDRA
      6,628
      7,232
      -8.4
      -8.4
      6,628
      7,232
      -8.4
      -8.4
      TOTAL TOYOTA DIV. PICKUP
      19,137
      19,949
      -4.1
      -4.1
      19,137
      19,949
      -4.1
      -4.1
      TOTAL TOYOTA DIV. TRUCK
      71,354
      72,559
      -1.7
      -1.7
      71,354
      72,559
      -1.7
      -1.7
                        NX
      2,964
      3,133
      -5.4
      -5.4
      2,964
      3,133
      -5.4
      -5.4
      RX
      5,520
      6,956
      -20.6
      -20.6
      5,520
      6,956
      -20.6
      -20.6
      GX
      1,418
      1,608
      -11.8
      -11.8
      1,418
      1,608
      -11.8
      -11.8
      LX
      534
      585
      -8.7
      -8.7
      534
      585
      -8.7
      -8.7
      TOTAL LEXUS TRUCK
      10,436
      12,282
      -15
      -15
      10,436
      12,282
      -15
      -15
      TOTAL TOYOTA TRUCK
      81,790
      84,841
      -3.6
      -3.6
      81,790
      84,841
      -3.6
      -3.6
      Selling Days
      24
      24
          24
      24
          DSR = Daily Selling Rate
                   
    • By William Maley
      There is one vehicle that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has to get right the first time - the minivan. The company is credited for creating this vehicle segment back in the eighties with the introduction of the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager. Each subsequent version brought forth some new improvement or feature that put it ahead of the pack. But due to the bankruptcy in 2009 and subsequent merger with Fiat, plans for the next-generation Chrysler Town and Country and Dodge Caravan were pushed back. This left the old model struggling against some fresh competition in the form of the Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna. 
      But last year, Chrysler surprised everyone with a new minivan. Wearing the Pacifica nameplate, the van was unlike anything that had come before. It featured a sleek design, handsome interior, and the option of a plug-in hybrid powertrain. The bigger surprise was that Chrysler would be the only brand getting the new van. The Dodge Caravan would continue in its current incarnation for a few years to provide a low-cost option for those shoppers. Has Chrysler pulled a rabbit out its hat or has the unthinkable happened and the Pacifica trails the competition?
      The first thing to take in about the new Pacifica is how good-looking it is. The design comes courtesy of the 700C that debuted quietly a few years back at the Detroit Auto Show. The rounded front end is reminiscent of the recently departed 200 with a narrow grille and headlights, chrome trim along the edges of the grilles, and a sculpted hood. The side profile shows off two character lines; one running from the front fender to the chrome trim for the windows and another running through the door handles and curving into the rear fender. We would only make one slight change to the Pacifica. Our Touring L tester featured 17-inch wheels that looked a bit small for a vehicle this size. We would go for the larger 18-inch wheels that fill in the wheel wells much better.
      Anyone who has been in the last-generation Chrysler Town and Country or Dodge Caravan knows the interior was well past its sell-by date. When pitted against competitors, the two vans came up very short in terms of design, materials, space for cargo and passengers; and infotainment. Step inside the Pacifica and it is clear that Chrysler has done its homework. The design is much more modern with flowing lines and contrasting colors. It also feels more spacious than the outgoing vans thanks to some smart decisions such as the removal of the center console to allow for an open floor between driver and passenger, and the use of a knob for the transmission. Material quality has also seen a noticeable improvement with many surfaces now boasting soft-touch plastics. It wouldn’t be crazy to say the Chrysler Pacifica is ahead of everyone when it comes to the interior.
      Depending on the trim, you can order the Pacifica with seating for seven or eight people. Our Touring L featured the eight-seat layout with a removable middle seat for the third row. It will take you a few moments to figure out how to remove the seat, but once you do, it is quite easy to remove and install the seat. The rest of the seats feature Chrysler’s Stow ’n Go folding system where the seats can fold into compartments in the floor to provide a flat load area. Cargo area is in line with the current crop of minivans with 32.3 cubic feet behind the third row, 87.5 cubic feet behind the second row, and 140.5 cubic feet with both rows folded. As for passengers, both rows of rear seats provide an excellent amount of head and legroom. Getting into the third row is much easier thanks to second-row seats offering a tilt function.
      FCA has equipped the Pacifica with the newest version of their UConnect system. The interface may look similar to the older UConnect system, but there are a number of changes that help catapult this new version towards the top of the infotainment system list. First, the new system is much sharper thanks to the new fonts and an updated screen that provides improved brightness levels. FCA has also improved the overall performance of the system, meaning no slow downs when going between various functions. One item we cannot comment on is navigation as our test Pacifica didn’t come with it.
      Power for the Pacifica comes from the 3.6L Pentastar V6 with 287 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission that routes power to the front-wheels only. It might not be the fastest van on the road (that honor falls to the Toyota Sienna), but Pacifica comes very close. Power comes on a smooth and steady rate. You’ll find yourself not wanting more power when merging onto a freeway or trying to make a pass. FCA has seemed to get its act together with the nine-speed automatic transmission. Issues with clunky shifts and gear hunting have been mostly ironed out. The transmission now features smooth and quick upshifts. The only item we would want FCA to work on is the transmission’s hesitation to downshift in certain situations such as making a pass.
      EPA fuel economy for the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica is rated at 18 City/28 Highway/22 Combined. Our week mostly spent in the city returned 23.2 mpg.
      The primary concern when it comes to a van’s ride and handling characteristics is providing maximum comfort and the Pacifica delivers. The suspension delivers a smooth ride even on some of the rough roads on offer from Metro Detroit area. An added bonus is how well the Pacifica isolates road and wind noise from coming inside. At highway speeds, only a whisper of wind noise makes it inside. But the Pacifica becomes a bit of a surprise when it comes to handling. Despite its large size, FCA’s engineers made the Pacifica feel quite nimble. The steering might not give that impression as it feels somewhat light when turning. But go around a corner and the van feels more like a midsize sedan than a van. 
      It has been a long time coming for a new minivan from FCA and the good news is that they haven’t dropped the ball. The Pacifica may not have ripped up the rulebook when it comes to minivans, but it sure has expanded or rewritten bits of it. From a surprising balance of ride and handling characteristics to the best interior in the class, it is clear that FCA wants to reclaim the crown of the best minivan. But there one thing that we need to address and that is FCA’s poor reliability history. No matter which survey or study look at, more often than not, FCA’s core brands are towards the bottom. What does this mean for the Pacifica? We can’t say for right now, but this could be the one thing that makes or breaks Chrysler’s new van.
      For right now, the Pacifica is at the top of the class.
      Disclaimer: Chrysler Provided the Pacifica, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Chrysler
      Model: Pacifica
      Trim: Touring L
      Engine: 3.6L 24-Valve VVT V6
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 287 @ 6,400
      Torque @ RPM: 262 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/28/22
      Curb Weight: 4,330 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Windsor, Ontario
      Base Price: $34,495
      As Tested Price: $36,880 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Audio Group - $895.00
      8 Passenger Seating - $495.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      There is one vehicle that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has to get right the first time - the minivan. The company is credited for creating this vehicle segment back in the eighties with the introduction of the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager. Each subsequent version brought forth some new improvement or feature that put it ahead of the pack. But due to the bankruptcy in 2009 and subsequent merger with Fiat, plans for the next-generation Chrysler Town and Country and Dodge Caravan were pushed back. This left the old model struggling against some fresh competition in the form of the Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna. 
      But last year, Chrysler surprised everyone with a new minivan. Wearing the Pacifica nameplate, the van was unlike anything that had come before. It featured a sleek design, handsome interior, and the option of a plug-in hybrid powertrain. The bigger surprise was that Chrysler would be the only brand getting the new van. The Dodge Caravan would continue in its current incarnation for a few years to provide a low-cost option for those shoppers. Has Chrysler pulled a rabbit out its hat or has the unthinkable happened and the Pacifica trails the competition?
      The first thing to take in about the new Pacifica is how good-looking it is. The design comes courtesy of the 700C that debuted quietly a few years back at the Detroit Auto Show. The rounded front end is reminiscent of the recently departed 200 with a narrow grille and headlights, chrome trim along the edges of the grilles, and a sculpted hood. The side profile shows off two character lines; one running from the front fender to the chrome trim for the windows and another running through the door handles and curving into the rear fender. We would only make one slight change to the Pacifica. Our Touring L tester featured 17-inch wheels that looked a bit small for a vehicle this size. We would go for the larger 18-inch wheels that fill in the wheel wells much better.
      Anyone who has been in the last-generation Chrysler Town and Country or Dodge Caravan knows the interior was well past its sell-by date. When pitted against competitors, the two vans came up very short in terms of design, materials, space for cargo and passengers; and infotainment. Step inside the Pacifica and it is clear that Chrysler has done its homework. The design is much more modern with flowing lines and contrasting colors. It also feels more spacious than the outgoing vans thanks to some smart decisions such as the removal of the center console to allow for an open floor between driver and passenger, and the use of a knob for the transmission. Material quality has also seen a noticeable improvement with many surfaces now boasting soft-touch plastics. It wouldn’t be crazy to say the Chrysler Pacifica is ahead of everyone when it comes to the interior.
      Depending on the trim, you can order the Pacifica with seating for seven or eight people. Our Touring L featured the eight-seat layout with a removable middle seat for the third row. It will take you a few moments to figure out how to remove the seat, but once you do, it is quite easy to remove and install the seat. The rest of the seats feature Chrysler’s Stow ’n Go folding system where the seats can fold into compartments in the floor to provide a flat load area. Cargo area is in line with the current crop of minivans with 32.3 cubic feet behind the third row, 87.5 cubic feet behind the second row, and 140.5 cubic feet with both rows folded. As for passengers, both rows of rear seats provide an excellent amount of head and legroom. Getting into the third row is much easier thanks to second-row seats offering a tilt function.
      FCA has equipped the Pacifica with the newest version of their UConnect system. The interface may look similar to the older UConnect system, but there are a number of changes that help catapult this new version towards the top of the infotainment system list. First, the new system is much sharper thanks to the new fonts and an updated screen that provides improved brightness levels. FCA has also improved the overall performance of the system, meaning no slow downs when going between various functions. One item we cannot comment on is navigation as our test Pacifica didn’t come with it.
      Power for the Pacifica comes from the 3.6L Pentastar V6 with 287 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission that routes power to the front-wheels only. It might not be the fastest van on the road (that honor falls to the Toyota Sienna), but Pacifica comes very close. Power comes on a smooth and steady rate. You’ll find yourself not wanting more power when merging onto a freeway or trying to make a pass. FCA has seemed to get its act together with the nine-speed automatic transmission. Issues with clunky shifts and gear hunting have been mostly ironed out. The transmission now features smooth and quick upshifts. The only item we would want FCA to work on is the transmission’s hesitation to downshift in certain situations such as making a pass.
      EPA fuel economy for the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica is rated at 18 City/28 Highway/22 Combined. Our week mostly spent in the city returned 23.2 mpg.
      The primary concern when it comes to a van’s ride and handling characteristics is providing maximum comfort and the Pacifica delivers. The suspension delivers a smooth ride even on some of the rough roads on offer from Metro Detroit area. An added bonus is how well the Pacifica isolates road and wind noise from coming inside. At highway speeds, only a whisper of wind noise makes it inside. But the Pacifica becomes a bit of a surprise when it comes to handling. Despite its large size, FCA’s engineers made the Pacifica feel quite nimble. The steering might not give that impression as it feels somewhat light when turning. But go around a corner and the van feels more like a midsize sedan than a van. 
      It has been a long time coming for a new minivan from FCA and the good news is that they haven’t dropped the ball. The Pacifica may not have ripped up the rulebook when it comes to minivans, but it sure has expanded or rewritten bits of it. From a surprising balance of ride and handling characteristics to the best interior in the class, it is clear that FCA wants to reclaim the crown of the best minivan. But there one thing that we need to address and that is FCA’s poor reliability history. No matter which survey or study look at, more often than not, FCA’s core brands are towards the bottom. What does this mean for the Pacifica? We can’t say for right now, but this could be the one thing that makes or breaks Chrysler’s new van.
      For right now, the Pacifica is at the top of the class.
      Disclaimer: Chrysler Provided the Pacifica, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Chrysler
      Model: Pacifica
      Trim: Touring L
      Engine: 3.6L 24-Valve VVT V6
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 287 @ 6,400
      Torque @ RPM: 262 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/28/22
      Curb Weight: 4,330 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Windsor, Ontario
      Base Price: $34,495
      As Tested Price: $36,880 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Audio Group - $895.00
      8 Passenger Seating - $495.00
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