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trinacriabob

The SF Bay Bridge is CLOSED

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Commuting to work this morning, I thought this was a joke. But it's true.

The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, the "workhorse" of the bridges in the Bay Area, is closed. This one connects to the city to the East Bay where millions of people live in Oakland, Berkeley, and many other towns. (The postcard bridge, the Golden Gate, connects the city to more remote, way more expensive and less populous areas).

Unlike almost exactly 20 years ago (Oct 17, 1989) when the Loma Prieta Quake popped a section out of the roadway, this time, there was no natural disaster. A connecting rod on the "East Span," which they are actually replacing with an entirely new bridge as we speak, snapped and hit a few cars during the commute hour. :mind-blowing:

Have you been following this? Crazy!

Link to Bay Bridge closure / mishap

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I heard about this on facebook last night, but couldn't find anything on it.

WOW.

I didn't know you lived in the bay area. I thought you lived in LA.

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I heard about this on facebook last night, but couldn't find anything on it.

WOW.

I didn't know you lived in the bay area. I thought you lived in LA.

Well, North Central California. I'm from LA (native, at that :lol:). Pit stops in: New Jersey (kid), Atlanta (right after college), and OR/WA (parents relocated there).

Pretty crazy about the bridge, though. It'll be interesting to find out how something in its structure just sort of snaps and falls off.

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Well, they were worried about the bridge after they did that inspection when the put the new piece in place.

This does not surprise me unfortunately.

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Pretty crazy about the bridge, though. It'll be interesting to find out how something in its structure just sort of snaps and falls off.

This is what happened in the Mianus River Bridge disaster in CT... the entire deck was supported by a pin and hanger... and when two corroded and broke, bye-bye bridge... whats scary is that there were only three of these types of bridge in the country... and one of them is in my backyard... the Garden State Parkway bridge over the Great Egg Harbor River... well in the mid-ninties during an inspection it was discovered that some of the hangers had broken, and luckily no two were on the same deck-load... but it still closed that thing for a while. Scary how many times I drove over that.

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Apparently the feds are in on it now too. This comes almost 20 years to the day of the 1989 earthquake which F-ed up the bridge the first time. Some Berkeley guy says commercial truck traffic should not be aloud to go over the bridge until the new span is ready.

Personally I try to avoid the bridge when going to the City. 101 to 280 FTW

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Wow, I imagine that is going to clog up other bridges. Are people heading as far south as the San Mateo Bridge to get across? How are they dealing with the situation?

Recently the DOT discovered that the I-80 bridge over the Mississippi in Davenport has some severe stress cracking. It is bad enough that the outer lanes have been closed, so there is only one lane open in each direction to cut down on the load the bridge carries. Repairs are going to take months, and this is one of the most important river crossings in the nation. They are also rebuilding the I-80 bridge in Omaha because it was also in bad shape. We as a nation have let our infrastructure go to hell in a handbasket over the last decade.

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We as a nation have let our infrastructure go to hell in a handbasket over the last decade.

Retrofitting our interstate system will cost us close to $3T. But it will also open up a tremendous job opportunity and bump the economy. The steel, workers, engineers and other resources should be Made in USA. Most of these bridges are over 40 years old. Dynamic stress fatigue is the number one cause of an older bridge collapse.

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Retrofitting our interstate system will cost us close to $3T. But it will also open up a tremendous job opportunity and bump the economy. The steel, workers, engineers and other resources should be Made in USA. Most of these bridges are over 40 years old. Dynamic stress fatigue is the number one cause of an older bridge collapse.

A real stimulus package, and way overdue.

It's past time that we focus on real things like infrastructure for a change.

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Wow, I imagine that is going to clog up other bridges. Are people heading as far south as the San Mateo Bridge to get across? How are they dealing with the situation?

Part of it will be handled by BART, who will run longer trains and more frequently.

Wow, some of the snobs in Orinda, Lafayette and Walnut Creek may finally get to see the inside of a BART train.

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Sounds like Cali pays about as much attention to the condition of its critical infrastructure as Quebec.

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It may be lack of money in California (thanks, Schwarzenegger!), but up here, it's the looney-left and their hatred of all things car-related. Can you imagine, the entire central core of Toronto has been shut down for WEEKS. Adelaide St., which is the only eastbound route in the core that moves, has been closed for 2 weeks while the unionized city workers fart around with streetcar tracks. And (it gets better) 2 of the connecting streets (Church and Yonge) are also either entirely closed or down to one lane for sewer replacement and streetcar tracks. I have the misfortune of having to travel east to west in the core every day and it is a night mare of L.A. proportions. But that is the intent: frustrate and starve motorists until they abandon their cars for (get ready for this) bicycles, because the bankrupt city is spending $60 million on bicycle lanes.

:CanadaEmoticon:<_<

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I emailed a couple fiends out there, one lives in Concord and the other in Walnut Creek, and commute to SF. They are taking the BART instead of driving this week. One couple I know there have lived there for over 10 years, never commuted by BART, only by Suburban/Escalade previously.

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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I emailed a couple fiends out there, one lives in Concord and the other in Walnut Creek, and commute to SF. They are taking the BART instead of driving this week. One couple I know there have lived there for over 10 years, never commuted by BART, only by Suburban/Escalade previously.

Ahh Pelosi taking steps to save our environment from her own homeground.

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Ahh Pelosi taking steps to save our environment from her own homeground.

Not sure what Pelosi has to do with the Bay Bridge.

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Sounds like Cali pays about as much attention to the condition of its critical infrastructure as Quebec.

Funding. Blame Schwarzenegger. You could also blame the US Government, as California only gets back about $0.45 for every $1 it pays in federal taxes. Yes, we subsidize places like Idaho and Mississippi.

It may be lack of money in California (thanks, Schwarzenegger!), but up here, it's the looney-left and their hatred of all things car-related. Can you imagine, the entire central core of Toronto has been shut down for WEEKS. Adelaide St., which is the only eastbound route in the core that moves, has been closed for 2 weeks while the unionized city workers fart around with streetcar tracks. And (it gets better) 2 of the connecting streets (Church and Yonge) are also either entirely closed or down to one lane for sewer replacement and streetcar tracks. I have the misfortune of having to travel east to west in the core every day and it is a night mare of L.A. proportions. But that is the intent: frustrate and starve motorists until they abandon their cars for (get ready for this) bicycles, because the bankrupt city is spending $60 million on bicycle lanes.

:CanadaEmoticon:<_<

Exactly, and yes that sounds &#036;h&#33;ty up there. Good luck with that.

Ahh Pelosi taking steps to save our environment from her own homeground.

Huh? This doesn't make any sense. SF is one of the most environmentally-progressive areas in the nation, along with the Pacific NW as a whole. I'd say Oregon is more of a greenie mecca, but the Bay Area is pretty enviro.

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Funding. Blame Schwarzenegger. You could also blame the US Government, as California only gets back about $0.45 for every $1 it pays in federal taxes. Yes, we subsidize places like Idaho and Mississippi.

What exactly is being subsidized so heavily in Idaho?

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The Bay Bridge is 73 years old. The Loma Prieta earthquake happened 20 years ago. The joke is that the eastern span of the Bay Bridge should have already been replaced, but then the local politicians wanted to built a monument to themselves instead of a functional causeway, and it will be four years before the self-anchored suspension span is completed.

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What exactly is being subsidized so heavily in Idaho?

Seconded. When I drive in the Northwest US (once or twice a year) the roads are fine until I cross the Washington State line into Idaho and after I cross the Canadian border into British Columbia, but not inbetween.

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Seconded. When I drive in the Northwest US (once or twice a year) the roads are fine until I cross the Washington State line into Idaho and after I cross the Canadian border into British Columbia, but not inbetween.

That's because Sarah Palin comes from that area...kind of makes sense :wink:

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The Bay Bridge is 73 years old. The Loma Prieta earthquake happened 20 years ago. The joke is that the eastern span of the Bay Bridge should have already been replaced, but then the local politicians wanted to built a monument to themselves instead of a functional causeway, and it will be four years before the self-anchored suspension span is completed.

I was waiting for this. (I was a year off, thinking it was 1937, but, what the hell, they had the foresight to do 5 lanes in each direction on different bridge decks.

That's right. The architectural statement was unnecessary. While the old cantilevered East Span was hideous, a sleek, high up in the air causeway would have done the trick. The insertion of that suspension component with the tower that looks kind of modern/kind of retro/kind of Coit is large part of the bridge's cost (overrun).

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What exactly is being subsidized so heavily in Idaho?

Seconded. When I drive in the Northwest US (once or twice a year) the roads are fine until I cross the Washington State line into Idaho and after I cross the Canadian border into British Columbia, but not inbetween.

...you guys haven't heard of agricultural subsidies?

Seriously, it doesn't matter "what" is being subsidized...just look at the ratios of Federal funding vs. federal taxes paid by state. CA has the lowest rate of return, and many more rural, "nowhere" states get far more back than they put in. Idaho and Mississippi are both relatively low-population and aren't economic powerhouses--Mississippi is in fact the poorest state.

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many more rural, "nowhere" states get far more back than they put in.

Mississippi is in fact the poorest state.

Sounds like you like all those demographic and statistical charts. They're interesting. They almost become predictable cliches.

Lowest SAT scores/highest teen pregnancy/lowest high school graduation:

It's the inland, non-coastal Southern States (MS, AR, etc.) and Nevada (a very white trash kind of place)

Highest SAT scores/lowest teen pregnancy/highest high school graduation:

It's the (Nordic) Upper Midwest (MN, WI) and New England (more so NH, VT)

Back to the topic at hand, (Southern) California failed to instill a commuter rail/heavy transit rail lifestyle as it should have for its intended growth, giving rise to a mind-boggling freeway system and those ramps/interchanges that postcards are made of. They're doing rapid transit 40 years later, after all the infrastructure is in place and sprawl has occurred. It embarrasses me that my hometown of L.A. has a despicable rail system (with the only line that's worth a damn being the "Red Line" because it's a fully grade-separated heavy rail subway system on a dedicated track) and all the other lines are essentially trolley cars (Green, Blue, Gold, and future Acqua lines) that run through the streets of South Central. Nice. Come on, this is America's gateway city to Asia and Oceania. Atlanta, where I lived for 2 years and really enjoyed, has a stellar transit system in its MARTA Rail (it's similar to BART and the DC Metro).

Well, looks like the Bay Bridge will be open for Monday morning's commute...and BART trains will be less crowded.

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LA did a good job with the freeways. No other city has anywhere near as extensive of a network.

What LA stupidly did, however, was turn down the offer from Alweg to build a FREE MONORAIL line, in hopes of demonstrating its success, leading to more lines. That was in the 1960s, and Ray Bradbury still comes out of his hole from time to time to complain about its absence.

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Back to the topic at hand, (Southern) California failed to instill a commuter rail/heavy transit rail lifestyle as it should have for its intended growth, giving rise to a mind-boggling freeway system and those ramps/interchanges that postcards are made of. They're doing rapid transit 40 years later, after all the infrastructure is in place and sprawl has occurred. It embarrasses me that my hometown of L.A. has a despicable rail system (with the only line that's worth a damn being the "Red Line" because it's a fully grade-separated heavy rail subway system on a dedicated track) and all the other lines are essentially trolley cars (Green, Blue, Gold, and future Acqua lines) that run through the streets of South Central. Nice. Come on, this is America's gateway city to Asia and Oceania. Atlanta, where I lived for 2 years and really enjoyed, has a stellar transit system in its MARTA Rail (it's similar to BART and the DC Metro).

Well, looks like the Bay Bridge will be open for Monday morning's commute...and BART trains will be less crowded.

One can only dream... right?

LA-Rail-Map12.jpg

http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2009/10.../#comment-12132

Edited by pow
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