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ToniCipriani

Elements to a good car review

20 posts in this topic

I'm trying to get myself on to write a user's review of my G6, so I can post it as an article.

Can someone help me? What are the good elements to a good car review that is (at least near) of professional quality?

Edited by ToniCipriani

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capriceman    0

according to the mags i have read you have to bash a GM then randomly talk about how much better toyota and honda makes better cars than GM.

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balthazar    1,870

word that!

Vehemently avoid using stereotypes and cliche's; not so much in general but automotively-speaking. Also avoid making constant comparisons to other cars: saying 'the radio power knob takes more effort to turn than a _____' tells us nothing- there is no comparison vehicle that is a universal common ground (I've never even been inside a camry).

Other than that- have at it.

I would be more than happy to copyproof it (spelling/grammar) for you, if you'd like. (Not saying there's anything wrong with your skills, TC- but it's usually beneficial to have a 2nd pair of eyes on it and you clearly want to present a piece of quality).

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Variance    0

I would discuss (maybe not in this particular order):

-A brief intro of the car

-The overall car design

-Overall quality (how solid the car feels/looks in and out)

-Interior/exterior features

-How easy it is to live with (comfort, convenience, fuel economy, etc.)

-Why you felt it was the best choice for you compared to competitor cars

-If you would recommend the car to others

There may be more but I think this would make for a well-rounded review.

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Variance    0

In particular, up to what level is personal opinions acceptable?

Well, a review of a car is more or less your opinion of the car. There's an inherent subjective tone in reviews. Just give an honest assessment of it: what you love about it, what needs work, what you could do without, etc. You should find a balance where you don't sound like you're gushing over the car but you don't want a review to read like an emotionless fact sheet, either.

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balthazar    1,870

Agreed. It's subjective, but it should be fact-based opinion, not wild, inaccurate opinion.

Variance gave a tidy overview of a solid approach. But just like I said: watch the 'best choice compared to others' segment. No one vehicle is an absolute class leader and here is where many 'journalists' go overboard by glossing over what's unimportant to them and unduly weighing what is. Right then they proclaim 'its the best' meanwhile omitting any reference to the tiny phrase "for me"... and the article is wrapped up as 'case closed'. Most journalists today fall into this trap.

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Flybrian    0

Pretty much what they said. Congrats for being one of the first interested in posting a through 'official' review of your car. In fact, if you'd like, yours can be Cheers and Gears' first Long-Term Review vehicle.

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trinacriabob    21

Very, very cool question. I like it.

To me, a great car review is the juxtaposition of great technical information that is verifiable and accurate blended with good wordsmanship that sets off mental pictures, makes analogies and transports you to a different place - the driver's seat of the car.

My education is entirely in technical fields, yet I think that my voracious appetite for reading car reviews, movie reviews, travel reviews and anything that represents opinions has affected my writing style - for the better. One of the biggest compliments I got was from a graduate business prof in the marketing arena who, when handing back group papers, wanted to know who had written the copy for a particular group's paper. He said that that person ought to take copywriting classes in the journalism unit. That person was me. It made my day and week...even though I wouldn't want to do that. I am creative in another way...through the design of buildings.

I don't know what you do or if you are in school. You may consider journalism courses aimed at this bent. Check the course content first and good luck!

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trinacriabob    21

Automobiles are a synthesis of form and function, make sure your review is in balance.

A more succint way of saying what I said. Nice.

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chris    0

It is not the primary job of a car review to present all of the facts, but it is important that the facts presented are correct (this is where proofreading/fact checking come in handy). The ideal car review is unbiased, and unfortunately you're starting off on the wrong foot in this case.

In my opinion, you should not attempt to pass this off as an unbiased review. This should really be an article on why you chose your G6 over the competition. This allows you to bring in more of a personal element and relate your own personal tastes and habits with what you find neat or useful about the car.

I really don't see very many well-written articles of this variety, so it may be a healthy change of pace! Heck, you might even win a few people over! (I assume this is one of your goals in writing this article.)

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Very, very cool question.  I like it.

To me, a great car review is the juxtaposition of great technical information that is verifiable and accurate blended with good wordsmanship that sets off mental pictures, makes analogies and transports you to a different place - the driver's seat of the car.

My education is entirely in technical fields, yet I think that my voracious appetite for reading car reviews, movie reviews, travel reviews and anything that represents opinions has affected my writing style - for the better.  One of the biggest compliments I got was from a graduate business prof in the marketing arena who, when handing back group papers, wanted to know who had written the copy for a particular group's paper.  He said that that person ought to take copywriting classes in the journalism unit.  That person was me.  It made my day and week...even though I wouldn't want to do that.  I am creative in another way...through the design of buildings.

I don't know what you do or if you are in school.  You may consider journalism courses aimed at this bent.  Check the course content first and good luck!

Probably I won't be taking up journalism as my career, I'm doing it just for fun. I want to stick to Comp Eng.

Edited by ToniCipriani

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Charger4U    0

:rotflmao: yea leave the element out of a good car report.

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