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Toyota touts U.S. impac tBillboards in 24 U.S

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Toyota is now proving that they know Americans are stupid.

Don't they think people will be asking themselves "if Toyota is hiring all these people.....and the Big 3 are dumping many more.......then are Americans really gaining anything?" The Big 3 used to pay good Union wages for honest working Americans.....but now the Japanese have show that you should just use non-union low wage suppliers to make your parts.....and screw the American working class.

Toyota: "Great for Reducing the American Standards of Living"

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Yeah, do the math: Toyota hires 900 people in Woodstock while Ford and GM lay off 3,500 in Oshawa and Oakville.

Sounds like progress to me.

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Yeah, do the math:  Toyota hires 900 people in Woodstock while Ford and GM lay off 3,500 in Oshawa and Oakville.

  Sounds like progress to me.

Not Toyota's fault for the layoffs.

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Fault? Who said anything about fault. I merely pointed out the obvious, as has been debated to death on this site in other threads: GM and Ford employ far more people in North America, by any measurable basis than any of the Japanese manufacturers. Being the smart business that Japan Inc is (witness the total annhilation of the television and radio market in the '70s), they learned from their early forays in the early '80s, by building enough factories here (and by pretending to be humble all along) to convince the gullible public that they are as American as Chevy and apple pie.

At least now the gloves are off and Toyota is no longer pretending not to be interested in wiping out Ford and GM.

Whatever happened to Electrohome, Zenith, Philco, RCA...oh, I could go on

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Personally, I'm getting tired of Toyota advertising. We get it already...your goal is to be #1. Thanks for reminding us every time we pick up a newspaper or turn on the TV. We'll throw you a nice party with cake and ice cream if it happens. In the meantime, cut the spin and just build your damn cars.

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"He said Toyota has had a long-term strategy of being accepted like an American company.

"Those billboards are the culmination of 35 years of focus on being American in America," Wangers said. "They've waited until now to thump their chest.""

ok, now that they are top dog...let's see if they can handle the heat that goes with it. you are now the target. let's see how badly you really wanted it.

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Oh please...I think all things considered only an idiot would assume that Toyota growing in the country is a net gain economically.

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Toyota is full of crap.

Also, here's an article refering to his from autoextremist:

Q. Toyota has introduced a series of billboards in 24 markets touting its contributions to the American economy. Your thoughts?

PMD: Here we go again. There is no question that to the people who have jobs in Toyota plants, the dealers who have made millions off of the success of the company and all of the suppliers who have enjoyed considerable profitability because of their relationship with the Japanese giant - Toyota is a very good thing. But it's important to know the cold hard facts about Toyota, because it is absolutely obsessed with two things: 1.) The fear of a realistic appraisal in the halls of Congress of their built-in trade advantages fueled by complicit Japanese government trade policies and their direct contribution to the erosion of the U.S. manufacturing base - and all the negatives associated with that statement, and 2.) Capturing the hearts and minds of American consumers with the ultimate (and stated) goal of becoming officially known as "America's Car Company." This billboard campaign is so obviously transparent, it's just unfortunate that too many people will just shrug at the message and keep driving. Anyone in this country who thinks that the gradual degradation of America's industrial base is a good thing is flat-out dreaming. The real reason for the existence of this billboard campaign (which will be followed by a series of national ads) is that Toyota doesn't want anyone or anything disrupting their gravy train. They want to point out that they've been here for years, and they insist that because of that fact that they're part of the fabric of America now and should be treated accordingly - as an American car company. I say bull$h!. They've been given a free pass to operate here, and they've been savvy enough to exploit every opportunity that our dim-bulb leaders have handed them, while those same leaders have created obstacle after built-in obstacle for our own automobile industry to deal with at every turn. I mean, think about it - what other country in the world allows manufacturers to come in and operate without restrictions and without contributing to the national coffers for the privilege of operating there? If the U.S. government treated Toyota (and other import auto manufacturers) like the Chinese government treats car companies wanting to do business in China, or better yet, like the Japanese treat companies trying to import automobiles there - then Toyota's profits (which at the end of the day go back to Japan, despite their convoluted spin) would be severely reduced, and their unchecked growth would be brought to a screeching halt. The facts of the matter are that the domestic automobile companies directly or indirectly account for between 1 out of 12 and 1 out of 14 jobs in this country, and there's no way in hell Toyota will ever make up for that, in spite of the Thomas L. Friedmans of the world who actually believe otherwise. Regardless of where you come out on Detroit's (and the UAW's) responsibility in the crisis they're facing today (and believe me, both parties contributed mightily to their dire predicament), this country cannot afford the cataclysmic consequences if GM or Ford were to spiral into bankruptcy. So, if you want to sit back and wish for the destruction of the domestic automobile industry and cheer on Toyota, go right ahead. But I say it's time for our government leaders and the consumers in this country to stop "shrugging" with each bit of news that the Toyotas of the world are taking over and stop thinking that it ultimately won't affect them - because it already has. Yes, it's a free country, and I'm damn glad to be here, but if our government doesn't take aggressive steps to level the playing field and make these foreign manufacturers pay for the privilege of operating here - and that doesn't mean charitable contributions and shiny happy PR campaigns either - then we're going to wake up one day asking, "What the hell happened?" and it won't be pretty.

Q. What can be done about this, or should we all just sit back and let the inevitable economic forces run their course?

PMD. In an idyllic economic theory class on some college campus, that would be just swell. Let the chips fall where they may and move on. But we're now dealing with a global economic world that cares little about "free" trade or doing business the way we as a country think it should be done. Every import auto manufacturer has exploited our way of doing things here. Build plants? Sure, we'll do that - if you guarantee a big enough incentive package that would make it worth our while. But if a Detroit manufacturer were to ask for some relief to do business the answer would be: "We're not bailing your asses out, what have you done for us lately?" It's as if the U.S. government is dismissing the 100+ years that the automobile industry has thrived here, and the role it has played in powering the economic engine that made America's economy the envy of the world. In Toyota's case, there's no question they've done an outstanding job, but there's also no question that they have exploited our government's incessant naivete - and used our Byzantine system that rewards companies who want to come here and do business, while penalizing the industries that have been part of the real fabric of America for over 100 years. This has to stop. Consider this: If each and every vehicle sourced from an offshore-based automobile company (whether they're built here or not) had a $1,500 tariff slapped on it that would be paid for by the manufacturer and would go directly to a fund that would underwrite the pensions and health care costs of our own automobile industry and its workers, then we'd be a lot better off. This isn't my original idea, either. David Stockman was asked this question several years ago - about how to solve the dilemma of the American auto manufacturers dealing with cost issues that imported car makers don't have and what can be done about it, and he said that this would be the only idea that would make sense, that there would be no other idea that he could think of that would solve this untenable situation. For the people who don't agree or believe in that? Well, then, if this "perfect storm" and downward spiral continues in the domestic auto industry, and GM or Ford is forced into bankruptcy, then everyone in this country will be forced to deal with the problem, whether they agree or believe in it or not. Rick Wagoner and Co. are dead right about one thing - it would be monumentally counterproductive - if not catastrophic - to the health and well-being of this country if the outstanding pension obligations that hundreds and thousands of people are depending on suddenly evaporated. It would affect every citizen of this country, from La Jolla to Washington, D.C.

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Toyota is full of crap.

Also, here's an article refering to his from autoextremist:

QUOTE

Q. Toyota has introduced a series of billboards in 24 markets touting its contributions to the American economy. Your thoughts?

PMD: Here we go again. There is no question that to the people who have jobs in Toyota plants, the dealers who have made millions off of the success of the company and all of the suppliers who have enjoyed considerable profitability because of their relationship with the Japanese giant - Toyota is a very good thing. But it's important to know the cold hard facts about Toyota, because it is absolutely obsessed with two things: 1.) The fear of a realistic appraisal in the halls of Congress of their built-in trade advantages fueled by complicit Japanese government trade policies and their direct contribution to the erosion of the U.S. manufacturing base - and all the negatives associated with that statement, and 2.) Capturing the hearts and minds of American consumers with the ultimate (and stated) goal of becoming officially known as "America's Car Company." This billboard campaign is so obviously transparent, it's just unfortunate that too many people will just shrug at the message and keep driving. Anyone in this country who thinks that the gradual degradation of America's industrial base is a good thing is flat-out dreaming. The real reason for the existence of this billboard campaign (which will be followed by a series of national ads) is that Toyota doesn't want anyone or anything disrupting their gravy train. They want to point out that they've been here for years, and they insist that because of that fact that they're part of the fabric of America now and should be treated accordingly - as an American car company. I say bull$h!. They've been given a free pass to operate here, and they've been savvy enough to exploit every opportunity that our dim-bulb leaders have handed them, while those same leaders have created obstacle after built-in obstacle for our own automobile industry to deal with at every turn. I mean, think about it - what other country in the world allows manufacturers to come in and operate without restrictions and without contributing to the national coffers for the privilege of operating there? If the U.S. government treated Toyota (and other import auto manufacturers) like the Chinese government treats car companies wanting to do business in China, or better yet, like the Japanese treat companies trying to import automobiles there - then Toyota's profits (which at the end of the day go back to Japan, despite their convoluted spin) would be severely reduced, and their unchecked growth would be brought to a screeching halt. The facts of the matter are that the domestic automobile companies directly or indirectly account for between 1 out of 12 and 1 out of 14 jobs in this country, and there's no way in hell Toyota will ever make up for that, in spite of the Thomas L. Friedmans of the world who actually believe otherwise. Regardless of where you come out on Detroit's (and the UAW's) responsibility in the crisis they're facing today (and believe me, both parties contributed mightily to their dire predicament), this country cannot afford the cataclysmic consequences if GM or Ford were to spiral into bankruptcy. So, if you want to sit back and wish for the destruction of the domestic automobile industry and cheer on Toyota, go right ahead. But I say it's time for our government leaders and the consumers in this country to stop "shrugging" with each bit of news that the Toyotas of the world are taking over and stop thinking that it ultimately won't affect them - because it already has. Yes, it's a free country, and I'm damn glad to be here, but if our government doesn't take aggressive steps to level the playing field and make these foreign manufacturers pay for the privilege of operating here - and that doesn't mean charitable contributions and shiny happy PR campaigns either - then we're going to wake up one day asking, "What the hell happened?" and it won't be pretty.

Q. What can be done about this, or should we all just sit back and let the inevitable economic forces run their course?

PMD. In an idyllic economic theory class on some college campus, that would be just swell. Let the chips fall where they may and move on. But we're now dealing with a global economic world that cares little about "free" trade or doing business the way we as a country think it should be done. Every import auto manufacturer has exploited our way of doing things here. Build plants? Sure, we'll do that - if you guarantee a big enough incentive package that would make it worth our while. But if a Detroit manufacturer were to ask for some relief to do business the answer would be: "We're not bailing your asses out, what have you done for us lately?" It's as if the U.S. government is dismissing the 100+ years that the automobile industry has thrived here, and the role it has played in powering the economic engine that made America's economy the envy of the world. In Toyota's case, there's no question they've done an outstanding job, but there's also no question that they have exploited our government's incessant naivete - and used our Byzantine system that rewards companies who want to come here and do business, while penalizing the industries that have been part of the real fabric of America for over 100 years. This has to stop. Consider this: If each and every vehicle sourced from an offshore-based automobile company (whether they're built here or not) had a $1,500 tariff slapped on it that would be paid for by the manufacturer and would go directly to a fund that would underwrite the pensions and health care costs of our own automobile industry and its workers, then we'd be a lot better off. This isn't my original idea, either. David Stockman was asked this question several years ago - about how to solve the dilemma of the American auto manufacturers dealing with cost issues that imported car makers don't have and what can be done about it, and he said that this would be the only idea that would make sense, that there would be no other idea that he could think of that would solve this untenable situation. For the people who don't agree or believe in that? Well, then, if this "perfect storm" and downward spiral continues in the domestic auto industry, and GM or Ford is forced into bankruptcy, then everyone in this country will be forced to deal with the problem, whether they agree or believe in it or not. Rick Wagoner and Co. are dead right about one thing - it would be monumentally counterproductive - if not catastrophic - to the health and well-being of this country if the outstanding pension obligations that hundreds and thousands of people are depending on suddenly evaporated. It would affect every citizen of this country, from La Jolla to Washington, D.C.

I think PMD reads my posts.......or maybe "great minds think alike"?? :scratchchin::lol:

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toyota "American"??

A-HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

*Laughs himself into a third hernia.*

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toyota "American"??

A-HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

*Laughs himself into a third hernia.*

Counterpoint:

In a way, they are more "American" than they were 10 or 20 years ago.

But to say Toyota is 100% red-blooded American is pushing it (just plain incorrect, really).

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The company isn't one atom more American than it was in 1957. They gotten a lot better at building cars (tho not so much trucks) that appeal to the consumers of the country they heavily target and heavily profit from, but that doesn't change what the company is nor --in and of itself-- will it ever.

It's a wildly idealistic nontruth.

In that "other way"... American cars are a lot closer to Japanese cars than they were 40 years ago; does that make American cars "Japanese" now?

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I saw one of those adds on my way into school one morning. I couldnt believe that Toyota has the nerve to say how great a boon they are to our economy. After all the years and all of the dollars GM, Ford, and Chrysler have put inot our economy, they come out making it sound like the only reason our economy is moving is because of how great they are. True, they are more American than they were in the 80s or even the 90s, but they can never claim to be as American as GM or Ford. Just makes me want to see GM rebound even more...

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