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Intrepidation

Funny thing about the Tundra Commercial

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I'm sure you guys have seen the recent Toyota Tundra commercial. Basically it says it's like the most reliable truck on the road because it's been "factory tested" Kinda funny that they can't back that up with real world experience like the other makers can (excluding Nissan).

Edited by Dodgefan

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Well, every manufacturer does factory testing, so it's not exactly something that stands out.

That said, I've never seen a broken-down Tundra (or Titan, for that matter). My dad's Sierra still runs good (~2002) and one of my uncles has a early 90's F-150 that's still on the road.

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Well, every manufacturer does factory testing, so it's not exactly something that stands out.

That said, I've never seen a broken-down Tundra (or Titan, for that matter). My dad's Sierra still runs good (~2002) and one of my uncles has a early 90's F-150 that's still on the road.

Yeah I know, but they tout it like it's the greatestthing in the world, and because they factory tested it, it'll last forever. Like you said, it's nothing special. I don't see why they are bragging about it.

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They "factory tested" their horsepower numbers. I'm sure their sludge-making 3.0l was factory tested as well. Was the "60 mpg" Prius factory tested? Toyota's got a reputation. For some, it's a reputation of reliability and dependability. For me, it's a reputation of playing fast-and-loose with the numbers and using everything they can to improve public perception - even if that means misleading the public.

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Well, every manufacturer does factory testing, so it's not exactly something that stands out.

That said, I've never seen a broken-down Tundra (or Titan, for that matter). My dad's Sierra still runs good (~2002) and one of my uncles has a early 90's F-150 that's still on the road.

You must not live in foreign car country because I've seen more than tundra and titan on the side of the road, and or being towed into a dealership.

Edited by Dsuupr

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I've never seen a broken-down Tundra (or Titan, for that matter). My dad's Sierra still runs good (~2002) and one of my uncles has a early 90's F-150 that's still on the road.

Sorry- I missed the intention of this part of your post. Is an '02 or even an early '90s domestic truck not expected to be still running in '06?

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Sorry- I missed the intention of this part of your post. Is an '02 or even an early '90s domestic truck not expected to be still running in '06?

Not according to Toyota. Only theirs should still be running.

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I've never seen a broken-down Tundra (or Titan, for that matter). My dad's Sierra still runs good (~2002) and one of my uncles has a early 90's F-150 that's still on the road.

Sorry- I missed the intention of this part of your post. Is an '02 or even an early '90s domestic truck not expected to be still running in '06?

No, I was just saying they've held up reasonably well and have been wholly reliable. I wasn't expecting them not to. In retrospect, I guess I should stuck to my uncle's Ford if a wanted to make a point about standing a real world test of time. A four-year old Sierra (or anything) really isn't that old.

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...any lean manufacturing guru will tell you that testing/inspection means you can't/don't trust your manufacturing processes...

Not that it's easy to refine automobile manufacturing processes to the point of no testing/inspection, but it's really nothing to brag about. It's a way to catch MISTAKES, and adds unnecessary cost if the process is good, or saves cost (and dissatisfied customers) if the process causes mistakes.

Edited by PurdueGuy

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Guest YellowJacket894

My dad has a '98 S-10 LS 5-speed with over 150,000 miles and it still has the original clutch.

Do that Toyota, you bunch of f@#king wanks.

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They "factory tested" their horsepower numbers.  I'm sure their sludge-making 3.0l was factory tested as well.  Was the "60 mpg" Prius factory tested?  Toyota's got a reputation.  For some, it's a reputation of reliability and dependability.  For me, it's a reputation of playing fast-and-loose with the numbers and using everything they can to improve public perception - even if that means misleading the public.

OK....enough of the hyperbole.

First of all, the "sludge-making" engines were ones that the consumers hadn't done timely LOF changes (some with over 15K miles without a change) when the owners manual clearly stated something like oil changes at 5K or 7,500 miles....

And Toyota never established the Prius as a "60mpg" hybrid. The EPA (flawed that it may be) are the ones that did that...

Let's get everything straight here.....

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My dad has a '98 S-10 LS 5-speed with over 150,000 miles and it still has the original clutch.

Do that Toyota, you bunch of f@#king wanks.

My unlces old 87 n/a supra had 210k miles on it, with the original clutch when sold. Thats pretty good for a toyota sports car eh? :scratchchin:

We all know that marketing cars can be a well oriented plot of talking up things. More over, we know that Toyota likes to do this and is pretty good at it. Thats all this is. People who trust them and believe what they say can believe it, and people who don't should look the other way.

Btw: Early 90s toyota pickups... Those are great machines. Not sure about the new model reliability though.

Edited by fuel_sipping

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My unlces old 87 n/a supra had 210k miles on it, with the original clutch when sold. Thats pretty good for a toyota sports car eh?  :scratchchin:

Not a big deal. You don't really use the clutch on the highway.

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OK....enough of the hyperbole.

First of all, the "sludge-making" engines were ones that the consumers hadn't done timely LOF changes (some with over 15K miles without a change) when the owners manual clearly stated something like oil changes at 5K or 7,500 miles....

Let's get everything straight here.....

they changed their oil BASED ON WHAT THE OWNERS MANUAL TOLD THEM! you need to get something straight here.......

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i wonder if they factory tested my old T100, that blew a head gasket... and left me on the side of the road for 5 hours...

or what about that recall on the steering? wwas that factory tested too?

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OK....enough of the hyperbole.

First of all, the "sludge-making" engines were ones that the consumers hadn't done timely LOF changes (some with over 15K miles without a change) when the owners manual clearly stated something like oil changes at 5K or 7,500 miles....

Let's get everything straight here.....

Wait, so only Toyota owners don't do timely oil changes, while owners of every other car make does them on time? No? Then why doesn't every other car make have a problem with sludging? Tell me how that can be Toyota specific.

There must have been some extreme temperatures to break down the oil, which would be a design fault, and not just taking too long to do an oil change.

Edited by CaddyXLR-V

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Factory tested! I suppose they "factory tested" there new Avalon that many are having troubles with. And lets not forget the new 6 speed automatic that operates on 4 speeds or the Prius which gets a "factory tested" 60 mpg in the city when in reality it does more like 40-45! And how about those sludgomatic 2200 L4's and 3.0 liter V6's or the overinflated hp numbers on most of there engines. Honestly, this companies sheer arrogance is even greater than there ignorance!

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First of all, the "sludge-making" engines were ones that the consumers hadn't done timely LOF changes (some with over 15K miles without a change) when the owners manual clearly stated something like oil changes at 5K or 7,500 miles....

Some people, with documented receipts of oil changes at the specified intervals were having sludging problems - so the problem wasn't solely due to people who abuse/neglect their vehicles. Toyota didn't design/engineer their vehicles to allow for the extremes in routine use and then aggrevated their problem by using a ridiculous 5,000 ("normal use") / 7,500 ("severe use") oil change interval policy in a vain attempt to have a lower cost of maintenance than their rivals. It bit them in the *ss.

Yes, 15k without an oil change is ridiculous - owner's like that deserve what's coming to them. But ask yourself this: Do you think those poeple are exlusive to Toyota, or do you think there are owners of EVERY brand that abuse/neglect their vehicles? I have a hard time believing that people like that are exclusive to Toyota.. which leads me to: why aren't other manufacturer's having the same sludging issues? I've heard of some issues of it with the 2.7 DCX engine and the 1.8l Turbo VW engine, but not nearly to the level that Toyota experienced with BOTH of their 4cyl and 6cyl engines.. which leads me back to this: Toyota didn't engineer/design an engine to meet & exceed real-world use & abuse.

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