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Found 20 results

  1. The number of models that you can get with a manual transmission has been declining over the past few years. For the 2019 model year, there could be another one off the list. The Truth About Cars has been going through General Motors' VIN decoder document for the 2019 model year. One of the items they have discovered is the 2019 Chevrolet Cruze will lose the six-speed manual for both the gas and diesel engines. It also looks like a CVT will become available. The document doesn't list what model the CVT could go in - our guess is that it could be an high-mileage eco model. Now, GM could change what is listed in the documents in the future. Under NHTSA regulations, an automaker can add new information on models up until 60 days before the start of production. We'll keep you posted. Source: The Truth About Cars Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears
  2. The number of models that you can get with a manual transmission has been declining over the past few years. For the 2019 model year, there could be another one off the list. The Truth About Cars has been going through General Motors' VIN decoder document for the 2019 model year. One of the items they have discovered is the 2019 Chevrolet Cruze will lose the six-speed manual for both the gas and diesel engines. It also looks like a CVT will become available. The document doesn't list what model the CVT could go in - our guess is that it could be an high-mileage eco model. Now, GM could change what is listed in the documents in the future. Under NHTSA regulations, an automaker can add new information on models up until 60 days before the start of production. We'll keep you posted. Source: The Truth About Cars Pic Credit: William Maley for Cheers & Gears View full article
  3. BMW's vice-president of sales and marketing for the M division, Peter Quintus believes that manual and dual-clutch transmissions will be going the way of the dodo bird performance vehicles. According to Drive, Qunitus has been banging the drum on the demise of manual transmissions for a bit. The reason isn't due to emissions but comes down them not being able to handle engines with loads of torque - saying 600Nm of torque (about 442 lb-ft). When asked about using a manual transmission from the U.S. that is able to handle all of this torque, Qunitus said the company found them to be "heavy and the shift quality was awful." The admission of Dual-clutch transmissions not long for this world is bit surprising as more manufacturers are beginning to install them into their performance vehicles as they would deliver fast shifts. That is changing with automatics as new technologies help them shift as fast as DCTs. "We are now seeing automatic transmissions with nine and even 10 speeds, so there's a lot of technology in modern automatics," said Quintus. "The DCT once had two advantages: it was light and its shift speeds were higher. Now, a lot of that shift-time advantage has disappeared as automatics get better and smarter." Source: Drive View full article
  4. BMW's vice-president of sales and marketing for the M division, Peter Quintus believes that manual and dual-clutch transmissions will be going the way of the dodo bird performance vehicles. According to Drive, Qunitus has been banging the drum on the demise of manual transmissions for a bit. The reason isn't due to emissions but comes down them not being able to handle engines with loads of torque - saying 600Nm of torque (about 442 lb-ft). When asked about using a manual transmission from the U.S. that is able to handle all of this torque, Qunitus said the company found them to be "heavy and the shift quality was awful." The admission of Dual-clutch transmissions not long for this world is bit surprising as more manufacturers are beginning to install them into their performance vehicles as they would deliver fast shifts. That is changing with automatics as new technologies help them shift as fast as DCTs. "We are now seeing automatic transmissions with nine and even 10 speeds, so there's a lot of technology in modern automatics," said Quintus. "The DCT once had two advantages: it was light and its shift speeds were higher. Now, a lot of that shift-time advantage has disappeared as automatics get better and smarter." Source: Drive
  5. This story is posted by MSN in their auto forum from a U.S. News and World Report story on "Why Are Manual Transmission Disappearing?" Thought it was an interesting piece. I agree with some of what is said but also feel there is a lack of effort on why some might still want a manual or how they can keep the value by being an informed sales person. I will agree that the best anti-theft device is a manual transmission now. Seems the news has more and more stories about the craziness of people breaking in to steal an auto and when it is a manual they end up having to leave. http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/ownership/why-are-manual-transmissions-disappearing/ar-BBwHYFp?li=BBnb7Kz
  6. G. David Felt Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com Manual Trans, Woman versus Men! Are Men becoming soft? Came across this story on Autoblog. After more than 50,000+ leases reviewed at swapalease.com shows that woman more than men enjoy driving a manual trans. Sadly this seems to point to the save the manual campaign as failing as manual auto purchases are a dying breed. According to the data, leases on Manual auto's have dropped by 22%. In 2012 85.4% of Manual Trans leases were by men, 2015 that number had dropped to 81.2%. Woman on the other hand in 2012 was 14.6% of their leases were a manual transmission but in 2015 that number has rose to 18.8%. Now more and more editorials are clarifying that as a road trip car, manuals are more fun, but as a daily driver for work, they are terrible. So what do you guys think. Is this a trend that Manuals could disappear from the roads of North America in the near future or will they survive but only in select performance based auto's or what? Sound Off
  7. If there has been one complaint of the new Honda Civic, it is that you cannot get a manual transmission with the optional turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder. But there could be a change in the air. A member on the CivicX forum got their hands on a slide revealing that a six-speed manual transmission option would be available on the turbo-four starting in the 2017 model year. The slide also reveals that it was planned for 2016, but was pushed back a year. No reason as to why wasn't said. Source: CivicX.com, The Truth About Cars Image Source: CivicX.com
  8. If there has been one complaint of the new Honda Civic, it is that you cannot get a manual transmission with the optional turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder. But there could be a change in the air. A member on the CivicX forum got their hands on a slide revealing that a six-speed manual transmission option would be available on the turbo-four starting in the 2017 model year. The slide also reveals that it was planned for 2016, but was pushed back a year. No reason as to why wasn't said. Source: CivicX.com, The Truth About Cars Image Source: CivicX.com View full article
  9. It seems some changes are coming to BMW's M division based on recent comments from the head of the division, Frank van Meel. First up is transmissions. van Meel tells Autocar that DCT dual-clutch and automatic transmissions have a bright future for M cars. Not so much for the manual transmission as sales are declining. “From a technical standpoint, the future doesn’t look bright for manual gearboxes. The DCT and auto ’boxes are faster and they have better fuel consumption. It’s difficult to say we’ll stick to the manual, but we still have a big fan community for manuals and we are not going to take away something the customer wants to have,” said van Meel. van Meel also brought up maximum power, saying that M cars will only go up to 600 horsepower. “For now, 600bhp is the most you can get in an M car. We’re at the limit. If you go on adding more horsepower and torque, it’d probably be over the limits.” Source: Autocar View full article
  10. It seems some changes are coming to BMW's M division based on recent comments from the head of the division, Frank van Meel. First up is transmissions. van Meel tells Autocar that DCT dual-clutch and automatic transmissions have a bright future for M cars. Not so much for the manual transmission as sales are declining. “From a technical standpoint, the future doesn’t look bright for manual gearboxes. The DCT and auto ’boxes are faster and they have better fuel consumption. It’s difficult to say we’ll stick to the manual, but we still have a big fan community for manuals and we are not going to take away something the customer wants to have,” said van Meel. van Meel also brought up maximum power, saying that M cars will only go up to 600 horsepower. “For now, 600bhp is the most you can get in an M car. We’re at the limit. If you go on adding more horsepower and torque, it’d probably be over the limits.” Source: Autocar
  11. If you've been waiting for a row your own American Performance Sedan, the Chevrolet SS with 6-speed manual just arrived on Chevrolet's configuration site. Before you try saying "Charger Hellcat", Dodge has said that they won't be building a manual transmission version of that car. In the SS, the 6-speed manual is a no cost option on a car with very few selectable options. In fact, the only other selectable factory options are a $900 sunroof and a $500 full size spare tire. The SS comes standard with leather, Chevrolet's MyLink with 8 inch screen, and Navigation. Selecting the 6-speed manual also changes the rear axle ratio from 3.27 to 3.70, so acceleration from the 415 horsepower / 415 lb-ft torque 6.2 liter V8 should feel even brisker than the slushbox. The rear differential regardless of transmission is a limited slip edition. Click to embiggen If the manual transmission SS sounds like your cup of tea, you better grab one soon. On top of being a limited production model with only about 2,500 units built per year, production is probably not going to extend beyond 2017 when the Holden ceases manufacturing in Australia. Hat tip to user Z-06 View full article
  12. If you've been waiting for a row your own American Performance Sedan, the Chevrolet SS with 6-speed manual just arrived on Chevrolet's configuration site. Before you try saying "Charger Hellcat", Dodge has said that they won't be building a manual transmission version of that car. In the SS, the 6-speed manual is a no cost option on a car with very few selectable options. In fact, the only other selectable factory options are a $900 sunroof and a $500 full size spare tire. The SS comes standard with leather, Chevrolet's MyLink with 8 inch screen, and Navigation. Selecting the 6-speed manual also changes the rear axle ratio from 3.27 to 3.70, so acceleration from the 415 horsepower / 415 lb-ft torque 6.2 liter V8 should feel even brisker than the slushbox. The rear differential regardless of transmission is a limited slip edition. Click to embiggen If the manual transmission SS sounds like your cup of tea, you better grab one soon. On top of being a limited production model with only about 2,500 units built per year, production is probably not going to extend beyond 2017 when the Holden ceases manufacturing in Australia. Hat tip to user Z-06
  13. For the past few years as an automotive writer, I've been keeping something quiet from a lot people. Some, including some of the members of this site know this secret. It's something that I have been slightly embarrassed by for the position that I have and know that it has kept some doors shut. I can't fully work a manual transmission. (Please put down the pitchforks and torches. Thank you.) It's not like I have never attempted to learn how to use a manual transmission before. The first time I ever drove a manual transmission in my friend Adam's 1991 Isuzu Stylus sedan. We drove around in a parking lot with me learning how to disengage the clutch and listen to the engine as a way to tell when to upshift. A year or two later, my dad and I took my younger brother's 1998 Subaru Legacy Wagon to do the same. For the most part, I was feeling ok with driving a manual transmission vehicle, even when I stalled it every few moments. But that all changed when I decided to take the Legacy out for a quick spin at night and only made it to end of our street because. I stalled the vehicle when leaving a stop and it wouldn't start back up. This made me felt that I had broken it. So I had to make that long walk of shame back to the house and call for a tow truck. It was determined that I didn't break the vehicle. Instead the alternator was found to be cause as it wasn't generating enough power. But even with that, I had made the decision to swear off learning and driving a manual transmission vehicle. Now admitting something like this out in public only would invite criticism and sarcasm. Just telling this to my family only got me mocked and ridiculed. But what I didn't say was my thought about the whole experience. While I did feel like I made some end-roads and knew that more doors would open if I understood how to work a manual, I also knew with the proclamation that I made about never driving, let alone learning; I had given up too easily. This was only made more apparent when I had to turn down a vehicle because it had a manual transmission last year. But this year, I made a promise to myself. I would get over the proclamation that I had made and once for all learn to drive a manual. But how was I going to do it? I vowed never to learn on my brother's vehicle since I thought that would only bring me bad luck. I also didn't want to use one of the vehicles that I review since I was worried that I would cause some sort of damage. I found myself in a tough spot. But unbeknownst to me, lady luck had a surprise in store for me. Last month, I was getting ready to swap review vehicles. Taking the place of the vehicle I had drove for the past week was a 2014 Volkswagen Jetta TDI. I wanted to see how the diesel model stacked up to both the Chevrolet Cruze Turbodiesel and Jetta Hybrid I had driven last year. After signing the paperwork and trading keys, I found myself going through the paperwork of the Jetta TDI to familiarize myself of what I would be driving around for the week. But as I was reading through the window sticker, a chill ran down my spine. I thought that I was getting one that was equipped with the six-speed DSG gearbox. But the window sticker said it was equipped with a six-speed manual. I went outside to look at the vehicle and to my horror, it was equipped with a six-speed manual transmission. Now I had three options with the Jetta TDI: Leave it in the driveway for the week Call the company and ask if they can pick it up since I cannot drive a stick Take the plunge and learn once and for all to drive a manual The first option was out of the question since Volkswagen gave me the vehicle to drive for a week. In return, I supposed to write something about my experience. Writing about how the Jetta TDI just sat there for a week didn't seem like the most appealing story. Option two was also a non-starter since I knew that I would be met with grief and sarcasm. So that left option three. At first I was very hesitant to the idea since I was worried about damaging the vehicle, i.e. worst case scenario. But somehow I was able to have some common sense enter my thoughts and calm me down to a point. "You have learned how to release the clutch pedal and the 1-2 shift. You're well ahead of those who don't even know how even to how to work the transmission. Just keep practicing and expanding your range, and you'll be able to open doors," I found myself saying. So I made the decision to keep the Jetta TDI and learn for once and for all to drive a manual. When I made this announcement at dinner, it was surprise to everyone. Even I couldn't believe what came out of my mouth when I said that I plan to keep the vehicle and learn to drive a manual transmission. After dinner, my dad and I climbed into the Jetta and made our way to the high school parking lot, a place that was big enough for me to practice. Once we arrived to the parking lot, we began with the basics; getting the vehicle to move on its own by letting off the clutch pedal. This was a tricky proposition for me since I knew that I couldn't release the pedal to fast or else the vehicle would stall. So began a marathon of stalling and keeping the Jetta running by hitting the clutch pedal if I thought the car would stall. But then something hit me. I began to not pay attention to the rev counter and started to listen to the engine note as my signal of when to get back on or keep removing my foot off the clutch. Once I figured this out, I started to let my foot my off at the right point that the vehicle wouldn't stall and it moved under its own power. We did this a few times before moving onto the next item; the transition from clutch to gas. This was a tricky thing for me before as I was either too slow or fast on the transition. Also the foot work was going to be a problem as I would have to coordinate my left and right legs to get going. Again, it took a few times and some stalling before my feet were working somewhat together and moving along at a somewhat reasonable rate. Once I had the practiced the basics and felt somewhat comfortable, we headed back home. I felt nervous as I piloted the Jetta TDI, worried that I would stall the vehicle and possibly cause an accident. But I didn't. As I pulled into the driveway and parked the Jetta, I breathed a heavy sigh of relief. I had drove the Jetta TDI and not damaged the vehicle, or anyone else around me. I considered it a great success. As the week went on, I would take some time to drive around in the Jetta TDI. Not only to practice, but to also make me feel not as nervous when driving with a manual transmission. Despite stalling the vehicle once in a while, I was beginning to feel more comfortable. I was also coming to a realization. In a way. the manual transmission is the last control a person has over the car. The feeling of doing something to move the car; being a part of the machinery. Before, a person felt more in control with a vehicle due to mechanical steering, the accelerator pulling a cable, and a number of other items. But with the advent of technology and the desire to improve efficiency, the driver was slowly removed out of the picture. In a way, the manual transmission is the last bastion for a driver. When the Volkswagen Jetta TDI was picked up, I was both happy and elated. Happy that I was finally able to feel a little bit more comfortable with driving a manual transmission. Elated that the Jetta TDI and I had survived with no damage. I thought to myself as the Jetta drove away, I wonder what vehicle I could ask for next with a manual transmission. Disclaimer: Volkswagen Provided the Jetta TDI, Insurance, and One Tank of Diesel William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  14. For the past few years as an automotive writer, I've been keeping something quiet from a lot people. Some, including some of the members of this site know this secret. It's something that I have been slightly embarrassed by for the position that I have and know that it has kept some doors shut. I can't fully work a manual transmission. (Please put down the pitchforks and torches. Thank you.) It's not like I have never attempted to learn how to use a manual transmission before. The first time I ever drove a manual transmission in my friend Adam's 1991 Isuzu Stylus sedan. We drove around in a parking lot with me learning how to disengage the clutch and listen to the engine as a way to tell when to upshift. A year or two later, my dad and I took my younger brother's 1998 Subaru Legacy Wagon to do the same. For the most part, I was feeling ok with driving a manual transmission vehicle, even when I stalled it every few moments. But that all changed when I decided to take the Legacy out for a quick spin at night and only made it to end of our street because. I stalled the vehicle when leaving a stop and it wouldn't start back up. This made me felt that I had broken it. So I had to make that long walk of shame back to the house and call for a tow truck. It was determined that I didn't break the vehicle. Instead the alternator was found to be cause as it wasn't generating enough power. But even with that, I had made the decision to swear off learning and driving a manual transmission vehicle. Now admitting something like this out in public only would invite criticism and sarcasm. Just telling this to my family only got me mocked and ridiculed. But what I didn't say was my thought about the whole experience. While I did feel like I made some end-roads and knew that more doors would open if I understood how to work a manual, I also knew with the proclamation that I made about never driving, let alone learning; I had given up too easily. This was only made more apparent when I had to turn down a vehicle because it had a manual transmission last year. But this year, I made a promise to myself. I would get over the proclamation that I had made and once for all learn to drive a manual. But how was I going to do it? I vowed never to learn on my brother's vehicle since I thought that would only bring me bad luck. I also didn't want to use one of the vehicles that I review since I was worried that I would cause some sort of damage. I found myself in a tough spot. But unbeknownst to me, lady luck had a surprise in store for me. Last month, I was getting ready to swap review vehicles. Taking the place of the vehicle I had drove for the past week was a 2014 Volkswagen Jetta TDI. I wanted to see how the diesel model stacked up to both the Chevrolet Cruze Turbodiesel and Jetta Hybrid I had driven last year. After signing the paperwork and trading keys, I found myself going through the paperwork of the Jetta TDI to familiarize myself of what I would be driving around for the week. But as I was reading through the window sticker, a chill ran down my spine. I thought that I was getting one that was equipped with the six-speed DSG gearbox. But the window sticker said it was equipped with a six-speed manual. I went outside to look at the vehicle and to my horror, it was equipped with a six-speed manual transmission. Now I had three options with the Jetta TDI: Leave it in the driveway for the week Call the company and ask if they can pick it up since I cannot drive a stick Take the plunge and learn once and for all to drive a manual The first option was out of the question since Volkswagen gave me the vehicle to drive for a week. In return, I supposed to write something about my experience. Writing about how the Jetta TDI just sat there for a week didn't seem like the most appealing story. Option two was also a non-starter since I knew that I would be met with grief and sarcasm. So that left option three. At first I was very hesitant to the idea since I was worried about damaging the vehicle, i.e. worst case scenario. But somehow I was able to have some common sense enter my thoughts and calm me down to a point. "You have learned how to release the clutch pedal and the 1-2 shift. You're well ahead of those who don't even know how even to how to work the transmission. Just keep practicing and expanding your range, and you'll be able to open doors," I found myself saying. So I made the decision to keep the Jetta TDI and learn for once and for all to drive a manual. When I made this announcement at dinner, it was surprise to everyone. Even I couldn't believe what came out of my mouth when I said that I plan to keep the vehicle and learn to drive a manual transmission. After dinner, my dad and I climbed into the Jetta and made our way to the high school parking lot, a place that was big enough for me to practice. Once we arrived to the parking lot, we began with the basics; getting the vehicle to move on its own by letting off the clutch pedal. This was a tricky proposition for me since I knew that I couldn't release the pedal to fast or else the vehicle would stall. So began a marathon of stalling and keeping the Jetta running by hitting the clutch pedal if I thought the car would stall. But then something hit me. I began to not pay attention to the rev counter and started to listen to the engine note as my signal of when to get back on or keep removing my foot off the clutch. Once I figured this out, I started to let my foot my off at the right point that the vehicle wouldn't stall and it moved under its own power. We did this a few times before moving onto the next item; the transition from clutch to gas. This was a tricky thing for me before as I was either too slow or fast on the transition. Also the foot work was going to be a problem as I would have to coordinate my left and right legs to get going. Again, it took a few times and some stalling before my feet were working somewhat together and moving along at a somewhat reasonable rate. Once I had the practiced the basics and felt somewhat comfortable, we headed back home. I felt nervous as I piloted the Jetta TDI, worried that I would stall the vehicle and possibly cause an accident. But I didn't. As I pulled into the driveway and parked the Jetta, I breathed a heavy sigh of relief. I had drove the Jetta TDI and not damaged the vehicle, or anyone else around me. I considered it a great success. As the week went on, I would take some time to drive around in the Jetta TDI. Not only to practice, but to also make me feel not as nervous when driving with a manual transmission. Despite stalling the vehicle once in a while, I was beginning to feel more comfortable. I was also coming to a realization. In a way. the manual transmission is the last control a person has over the car. The feeling of doing something to move the car; being a part of the machinery. Before, a person felt more in control with a vehicle due to mechanical steering, the accelerator pulling a cable, and a number of other items. But with the advent of technology and the desire to improve efficiency, the driver was slowly removed out of the picture. In a way, the manual transmission is the last bastion for a driver. When the Volkswagen Jetta TDI was picked up, I was both happy and elated. Happy that I was finally able to feel a little bit more comfortable with driving a manual transmission. Elated that the Jetta TDI and I had survived with no damage. I thought to myself as the Jetta drove away, I wonder what vehicle I could ask for next with a manual transmission. Disclaimer: Volkswagen Provided the Jetta TDI, Insurance, and One Tank of Diesel William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  15. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com November 12, 2013 The Chevrolet SS when it becomes available later this year will be available with one engine (6.2L V8 with 415 horsepower), six-speed automatic, five colors, two options, and that's about it. A lot of us should be happy that GM decided to give the Holden Commodore in the U.S. idea another shot. But a good amount of people are wondering why GM isn't doing more with SS. Automotive.com got to the bottom of this and chatted with Chevrolet Performance Cars Marketing Manager John Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick explained that the reason for the simple SS offering comes down to volume. When Pontiac was selling the G8 in the V6, GT V8, and GXP V8 trims; it was expected to sell upwards of 30,000 units per year. As we all know, the G8 didn't get close to that. With the new SS, GM is only expecting to sell 3,000 models due to shipping constraints from Australia. Fitzpatrick also said GM is keeping the variations down to keep profits up, at least for the time being. But what if the SS proves to be successful with the modest goals? According to Fitzpatrick, Chevrolet could look into offering a manual transmission and more powerful versions. Source: Automotive.com William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  16. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com November 12, 2013 The Chevrolet SS when it becomes available later this year will be available with one engine (6.2L V8 with 415 horsepower), six-speed automatic, five colors, two options, and that's about it. A lot of us should be happy that GM decided to give the Holden Commodore in the U.S. idea another shot. But a good amount of people are wondering why GM isn't doing more with SS. Automotive.com got to the bottom of this and chatted with Chevrolet Performance Cars Marketing Manager John Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick explained that the reason for the simple SS offering comes down to volume. When Pontiac was selling the G8 in the V6, GT V8, and GXP V8 trims; it was expected to sell upwards of 30,000 units per year. As we all know, the G8 didn't get close to that. With the new SS, GM is only expecting to sell 3,000 models due to shipping constraints from Australia. Fitzpatrick also said GM is keeping the variations down to keep profits up, at least for the time being. But what if the SS proves to be successful with the modest goals? According to Fitzpatrick, Chevrolet could look into offering a manual transmission and more powerful versions. Source: Automotive.com William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  17. By William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com April 11, 2013 Fiat is planning to add the option of an automatic transmission into the Abarth lineup. "We're not opposed to doing it. We just didn't think there would be consumer requests for it, and there is," Fiat's North American president, Tim Kuniskis told Wards Auto. The reason for this? To bring in more buyers, specifically women. With the new Abarth version of the 500C just around the corner, Kuniskis says that the company is expecting a few more women buyers to opt for the more potent version of the cabriolet. "I think when we'll see more women is when we have the automatic, and we're planning to add the automatic in the Abarth at some point, only because we're getting that feedback from customers," said Kuniskis. We don't know when the Abarth will be getting the automatic at this time. Source: Wards Auto William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  18. By William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com April 11, 2013 Fiat is planning to add the option of an automatic transmission into the Abarth lineup. "We're not opposed to doing it. We just didn't think there would be consumer requests for it, and there is," Fiat's North American president, Tim Kuniskis told Wards Auto. The reason for this? To bring in more buyers, specifically women. With the new Abarth version of the 500C just around the corner, Kuniskis says that the company is expecting a few more women buyers to opt for the more potent version of the cabriolet. "I think when we'll see more women is when we have the automatic, and we're planning to add the automatic in the Abarth at some point, only because we're getting that feedback from customers," said Kuniskis. We don't know when the Abarth will be getting the automatic at this time. Source: Wards Auto William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  19. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com October 24, 2012 If you have been reading any of the comparison tests of the new Cadillac ATS and the competition, you would have notice a reoccurring complaint; the six-speed manual transmission stinks. Apparently Cadillac is taking those criticisms to heart. A source tells Motor Trend that Cadillac has stopped production of ATSs equipped with the six-speed manual to fix complaints of the six-speed being awful. The fix involves moving to a softer bushing setup in the transmission. The fix will will be made before any cars equipped with the manual make it into the hands of consumers, meaning no recall. Source: Motor Trend William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  20. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com October 24, 2012 If you have been reading any of the comparison tests of the new Cadillac ATS and the competition, you would have notice a reoccurring complaint; the six-speed manual transmission stinks. Apparently Cadillac is taking those criticisms to heart. A source tells Motor Trend that Cadillac has stopped production of ATSs equipped with the six-speed manual to fix complaints of the six-speed being awful. The fix involves moving to a softer bushing setup in the transmission. The fix will will be made before any cars equipped with the manual make it into the hands of consumers, meaning no recall. Source: Motor Trend William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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