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    Porsche Decides To Make the Panamera More Practical, Introduces Sport Turismo

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      How to make the Panamera somewhat more practical 


    Porsche is expanding the Panamera lineup once again with the introduction of the Sport Turismo (wagon). Riding on the same wheelbase as the standard Panamera, Porsche extended the roofline and increased the size of the rear hatch. If you're expecting a noticeable increase in cargo, prepared to be disappointed. The Sport Turismo only adds 1.8 cubic feet of additional cargo space. The Sport Turismo also boasts a unique rear spoiler. At low speeds, the spoiler will trim itself to reduce drag. Higher speeds see the spoiler rise to add downforce. The spoiler will also rise when the panoramic sunroof is opened to cut down on wind noise.

    The Panamera Sport Turismo's engine lineup will mostly match up with the Panamera, except the Sport Turismo will all-wheel drive as standard.

    • Panamera 4: 330 horsepower
    • Panamera 4S: 440 horsepower
    • Panamera 4 E-Hybrid: 462 horsepower
    • Panamera Turbo: 550 horsepower

    Porsche says the Panamera Sport Turismo will go on sale in North America towards the end of this year with pricing starting at $97,250 (includes $1,050 destination charge). 

    Source: Porsche 
    Press Release is on Page 2


    SPORT TURISMO EXPANDS THE PANAMERA MODEL LINE

    • New body style with 4+1 seating configuration to debut in Geneva

    ATLANTA, March 1, 2017 -- Porsche is expanding the Panamera family with the addition of a new body style: The all-new Panamera Sport Turismo will be unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show (March 7 - 19, 2017). Four different versions will be available for ordering in the U.S. at launch: Panamera 4, Panamera 4S, Panamera 4 E-Hybrid, and the Panamera Turbo. Based on the successful sports sedan, the new Panamera variants make a profound statement in the premium segment with their unmistakeable design. At the same time, the Sport Turismo, with up to 550 hp, is one of the most versatile models in its class. With a large tailgate, low loading edge, increased luggage compartment volume and a 4+1 seating concept, the new Panamera model offers the perfect combination of everyday usability and maximum flexibility. "For Porsche, the Panamera Sport Turismo is a step forward into a new segment, but retains all of those values and attributes that are characteristic of Porsche", says Michael Mauer, Director of Style Porsche.

    From a technological perspective, the Sport Turismo is available with all of the innovations introduced with the brand new Panamera model line announced last year. These include the digital Porsche Advanced Cockpit, the advanced assistance system Porsche InnoDrive, Porsche Communication Management (PCM), adaptive cruise control, and turbocharged powertrains.  Chassis systems such as Rear Axle Steering and Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC Sport), the electronic roll stabilization system, are also available. In addition, all Panamera Sport Turismo vehicles are equipped with Porsche Traction Management (PTM) — an active all-wheel drive system with an electronically controlled multi-plate clutch, and adaptive air suspension with three-chamber technology as standard.

    The design and concept of an all-round sports car

    Just like the coupe-style Panamera sports sedan, the Sport Turismo is characterized by its very dynamic proportions — a reflection of the Porsche design DNA. The vehicle is 198.8 inches long, 56.2 inches high and 76.3 inches wide, while the wheelbase spans 116.1 inches. The silhouette is further characterized by short body overhangs and large wheels measuring up to 21 inches.

    Beginning from the B-pillars back, the Sport Turismo features a unique rear design. Above the pronounced shoulder, an elongated window line and equally long roof contour lend the vehicle its striking appearance. At the rear, the roof drops away less dramatically than the window line, resulting in a prominent and distinctive D-pillar which transitions into the shoulder section in a coupe-like fashion.

    First adaptively extendible roof spoiler

    At the top of the vehicle, the roof extends into an adaptive spoiler. The angle of the roof spoiler is set in three stages depending on the driving situation and selected vehicle settings, and can generate an additional downforce of up to 110 lbs. on the rear axle. In normal driving, the aerodynamic guide element — a central system component of the Porsche Active Aerodynamics (PAA) — stays in its retracted position with an angle of minus seven degrees, which reduces drag and thus optimizes fuel consumption.

    At track speeds, the roof spoiler automatically moves to the performance position with an angle of plus one degree, thereby increasing driving stability and lateral dynamics. When in the Sport and Sport Plus driving modes, the roof spoiler automatically moves to the performance position at speeds in excess of 55 miles per hour. PAA also provides active assistance by adapting the roof spoiler's angle of inclination to plus 26 degrees when the panoramic sliding roof is open at speeds above 55 mph. In this case, the spoiler helps to minimize wind noise.

    Redesigned rear compartment

    The new Sport Turismo is the first Panamera to feature rear seating for three passengers. The two outer seats take the form of individual seats — in keeping with the model line's reputation for sporty performance with maximum passenger comfort — thereby producing a 2+1 configuration in the rear. As an option, the Panamera Sport Turismo is also available in a four-seat configuration with two electrically adjustable individual seats in the back.

    The raised roof line of the Sport Turismo allows for easy entry and exit at the rear of the vehicle and offers excellent head clearance. The usability of the luggage compartment benefits from the wide opening tailgate and a loading edge height of just 24.7 inches. Measured to the upper edge of the rear seats, the  18.4 cu.ft storage capacity of the Sport Turismo (Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo: 15 cu.ft) betters that of the sports sedan by 0.7 cu.ft. When loaded up to roof level and with the rear seats folded down, the gains amount to approximately 1.8 cu.ft (50 liters). The backrests of the three rear seats can be folded down together or individually (in a 40:20:40 split) and are unlocked electrically from the luggage compartment. When all of the backrests are folded down, the loading floor is practically level. In this case, the storage volume is expanded to up to 49 cu.ft (1,390 liters) (Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo: 45.7 cu.ft).

    A luggage compartment management system is available as an option for the Panamera Sport Turismo models. Among other things, this variable system includes two rails integrated in the loading floor, four tie-down points, and a luggage compartment partition net.

    Four engines at market launch

    The Panamera Sport Turismo models will be available with the four engines launching with the sports sedan, and they consequently maintain the same 0 to 60 acceleration figures. The Panamera 4 Sport Turismo is powered by a 3.0 liter turbocharged V6 generating 330 hp, and it will accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 5.0 seconds with launch control. The Panamera 4S Sport Turismo reaches 60 mph (with launch control) in 4.0 seconds and is powered by a 2.9 liter twin-turbocharged V6 engine. The Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo is powered by the same combustion engine as in the 4S, and it has an additional 136 hp electric motor which in combination propel it from 0 to 60 in 4.4 seconds. The Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo reaches 60 (with launch control) in 3.4 seconds and is powered by a 4.0 liter twin-turbocharged V8 generating 550 hp.

    Availability and pricing

    The MY18 Panamera Sport Turismo models are expected to arrive in the United States at the end of 2017. Prices will start at $96,200 for the Panamera 4 Sport Turismo, $104,000  for the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo, $109,200 for the Panamera 4S Sport Turismo, and $154,000 for the Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo, excluding the $1,050 delivery, processing, and handling fee.

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    16 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    I know I'm the weirdo in this regard, but I like this a lot. 

    I agree your a Weirdo! ;) :lol:

    I honestly think it is butt :butthead: Ugly!

    :duck:

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    15 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    I agree your a Weirdo! ;) :lol:

    I honestly think it is butt :butthead: Ugly!

    :duck:

    What can I say? I like the odd looking cars. 

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    16 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    What can I say? I like the odd looking cars. 

    Cool, I am glad, that leaves the rest for me! :P

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    Porsche maybe moved the top rear edge backward like 6 inches. The bottom of the C-Pillar is in the same place. If it didn't have that black plastic 'air dam' there, most people wouldn't be able to tell the difference. And the sedan is already a hatch. This is pretty amazingly pointless- anyone who wants a Porsche and wants to carry things already bought a Cayenne.

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    18 minutes ago, dfelt said:

    Cool, I am glad, that leaves the rest for me! :P

    Oh I like a bunch of different cars and I don't like all the all ones. For example, I would set fire to an Aztek and would take a Barrett 50 BMG to a Juke before I'd ever sit in one. I do have an admitted weakness for wagons so it is what it is lol. 

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    3 hours ago, surreal1272 said:

    What can I say? I like the odd looking cars. 

    and.. its a wagon.. we all kno your love of WAGONS :P

    That being said.. I think that from a business standpoint Porsche is doing the right thing. Basically they made a CUV outta their best selling "car." They are giving it variants.. and it will look damn good on the sales charts as well as the balance sheet. Everything I have said that Cadillac should do with everyone of its cars.. including the CT6, with exception to XTS. Imagine a time when CTS was selling 5000 per month. Yup.. that was when there was a coupe and a wagon.. and a VSeries of all. Hmmmmmmmmmmm.. a cheap way of making more profits on a particular CAR.. not just a platform.. give it a variant with more/less doors or a hatch and call it NEW

    • Upvote 1

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    The panemera 'hatchback sedan' and the panemera 'hatchback wagon' are the exact same vehicle, and neither is a CUV.

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    1 hour ago, Cmicasa the Great said:

    and.. its a wagon.. we all kno your love of WAGONS :P

    That being said.. I think that from a business standpoint Porsche is doing the right thing. Basically they made a CUV outta their best selling "car." They are giving it variants.. and it will look damn good on the sales charts as well as the balance sheet. Everything I have said that Cadillac should do with everyone of its cars.. including the CT6, with exception to XTS. Imagine a time when CTS was selling 5000 per month. Yup.. that was when there was a coupe and a wagon.. and a VSeries of all. Hmmmmmmmmmmm.. a cheap way of making more profits on a particular CAR.. not just a platform.. give it a variant with more/less doors or a hatch and call it NEW

    I apologize for nothing lol and I agree with the strategy being taken here. It's just good business sense for Porsche and it costs very little to do compared to all their other endeavors. 

    2 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    The panemera 'hatchback sedan' and the panemera 'hatchback wagon' are the exact same vehicle, and neither is a CUV.

    Except the wagon actually gives it more space which is never a bad thing. The sloped back of the current Panamera limits what you can load back there. 

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    Ugly car made uglier.  And where is the power?  The other full size sedan from Stuttgart has way more.

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    17 hours ago, surreal1272 said:

    Except the wagon actually gives it more space which is never a bad thing. The sloped back of the current Panamera limits what you can load back there. 

    What- 3 cubic feet? Who is loading anything in a Panamera??
     

    EDIT: From R&T ~
    "As you'd expect, the Sport Turismo is more practical than its sedan counterpart, though not by a significant margin. With the rear seats folded up, cargo capacity is 18.3 cubic feet to the sedan's 17.4, and 49 cubic feet with the seats folded down, versus the sedan's 46.

    NAILED IT! :D

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    33 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    What- 3 cubic feet? Who is loading anything in a Panamera??
     

    EDIT: From R&T ~
    "As you'd expect, the Sport Turismo is more practical than its sedan counterpart, though not by a significant margin. With the rear seats folded up, cargo capacity is 18.3 cubic feet to the sedan's 17.4, and 49 cubic feet with the seats folded down, versus the sedan's 46.

    NAILED IT! :D

    It's about the shape though. It's like comparing the sloped back cargo hold of an FX35 with a more traditional layout like a 4-Runner. It's not always about sheer cubic feet. It's how it's distributed. 

    Edited by surreal1272

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    That space, up near the roof (because the base of the C-pillar is in the exact same spot) is basically useful for inflated balloons. 0.9 cubic feet with the seats up; there's no measurable/useful additional space. NO ONE will chose this over the sedan because of 0.9 CF more space- that's nuts.  

    Edited by balthazar
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