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    LA Auto Show: The Rest of the Reveals


    • Here are the rest of the vehicles that made a mark at LA

    Being a two person outfit is somewhat difficult when covering an auto show. With one on press release and story writing duty, and other trying to get pictures at the show, that means we can't cover all of the reveals. But that doesn't mean we're not going to give their due. We picked some of the vehicles that are important and/or interesting that debuted at LA.

    2016 Acura ILX

    Acura is trying to right the ship of the compact ILX. Since its introduction only a couple of years ago, the ILX has dropped both the base 2.0L four and Hybrid model, leaving just the 2.4 model. Now for the 2016 model year, Acura hopes to address many of the shortcomings with ILX.

    2016 Acura ILX 1

    First up is a new front end treatment with a new grille and jewel eye headlights. The back end gets a new bumper and taillights. Under the hood lies the 2.4L four-cylinder from the TLX producing 201 horsepower and 180 pound-feet of torque. This will come paired up to a eight-speed dual-clutch transmission, again from the TLX. The six-speed manual that was available previously has been dropped.

    Also new for the ILX is the addition of a A-Spec package which add a number of design tweaks such as 18-inch wheels, "Euro-style" stitching to the steering wheel, and suede on the seats.

    The revitalized 2016 ILX will be hitting dealers early next year.

    Audi Prologue Concept

    Audi's design language tends to follow the one design for any size car. Just look at their passenger car lineup and you're left wondering if they used the enlarge function on the copy machine to create their vehicles. Audi is planning to change this up in the future. To give us a preview, the company revealed the Prologue Concept.

    Audi Prologue Concept 2

    The front end gets a trapezoidal grille that sits wider and lower than on current models. A set of wedge-shaped laser headlights sit above air intakes with blade elements. Around back, the trunk lid is angled forward to suggest moment. Slimmed down taillights and trapezoidal exhaust tips finish off the rear. Overall, the Prologue Concept is proportioned in such a way to accentuate the all-wheel drive DNA that is part of Audi.

    Audi's design chief Marc Lichte says elements of the Prologue's design will be on future Audi models. But the concept itself could go into production. Rumors have been flying at LA that Prologue Concept is hinting at a flagship coupe that will sit above the A8.

    2015 Fiat 500X

    We known for awhile that Fiat was working on its version of the Jeep Renegade. At LA, Fiat let the 500X out into the wild.

    2015 Fiat 500X 1

    The 500X trades in the Renegade's boxy looks for something more 500-ish. To our eyes, it looks like a standard 500 with some added length and some added body cladding. Inside is the same story, with elements of the standard 500L making an appearance here.

    Powertrains include a turbocharged 1.4L MultiAir four-cylinder with 160 horsepower and 184-pound-feet or the 2.4L TigerShark four-cylinder with 180 horsepower and 175 pound-feet. The 1.4 will be available with a six-speed manual, while the 2.4L comes paired to a nine-speed automatic only. Front-wheel drive will be standard, while all-wheel drive with disconnecting rear axle will be optional.

    The 2015 500X will hit Fiat dealers in the first half of next year.

    2016 Jaguar F-Type

    2016 Jaguar F Type

    We've already talked one of the big changes for the F-Type which is the availability of all-wheel drive. But there was one other item up Jaguar's sleeve; a manual transmission. You'll be able to equip a F-Type with a six-speed manual if its a six-cylinder and rear-drive model. The manual transmission drops 22 pounds off the F-Type's weight.

    As for the all-wheel drive, we have a bit more info on that as well. The F-Type R with its 550 horsepower V8 will have all-wheel drive as standard, while the F-Type S with its 380 horsepower V6 will have it as an option.

    2016 Kia Sorento

    I know what you are thinking: Didn't Kia just release a refresh Sorento not that long ago? Yes they did. But in a marketplace where fresh meat is coming in quick, Kia decided to give the Sorento a redesign.

    2016 Kia Sorento 1

    The Sorento grows 0.2-inches in overall length and rides on a wheelbase that is 3.1-inches longer. The front is similar to the new Sedona with a flat front end, new headlights, and quad fog-lights. The rest of the vehicle is similar to current Sorento, aside from a tweaked tailgate. Inside, more of Sedona's influence is here with more soft-touch materials, improved control layout, and new screen for the infotainment system.

    Powertrains mostly carryover from the current Sorento with the 2.4L four-cylinder taking the base, and 3.3L V6 being the top dog. In the middle is a new turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder with 240 horsepower. Front-wheel is standard, while all-wheel drive is on the options list.

    Kia says the 2016 Sorento will be out at dealers in the first quarter of 2016.

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    What William didn't mention is that my Laptop hard drive died mid-day on the first day so I was limited to emailing him pictures via my camera's wifi and I wasn't able to post any articles.

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    What William didn't mention is that my Laptop hard drive died mid-day on the first day so I was limited to emailing him pictures via my camera's wifi and I wasn't able to post any articles.

     

    I was trying to be kind to you Drew.. You did a lot as it was.

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    AWESOME Guys, Sorry to hear about Drews Laptop HD, but then technology always will challenge us.

     

    Bill Thank you for all the awesome work you have done with Drew. You two Rocked the Show and brought us great info for even better discussions.

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      2018 Acura TLX Makes World Debut with Aggressive, Sporty Design, and New Technology Features

      Apr 11, 2017 - NEW YORK
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