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    Ford To Halt Focus and C-Max Production For Two Weeks


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    October 24, 2013

    Ford is planning two weeks of downtime at its Wayne, Michigan plant. The plant builds the Focus and C-Max Hybrid. Bloomberg reports the reason for this shutdown is to help reduce the number of C-Max Hybrids and Focus in stock. The start of October saw a 71-day supply of the Focus and 122-day supply for the C-Max. Compared to the month before, the supplies are up 13 and 14 days respectively.

    “They don’t want to get ahead of themselves. Ford has been focused on keeping their pricing in check. Their operating margin is in double digits. Nobody else is there and they’re obviously very proud of that,” said Alan Baum, an independent auto analyst at Baum & Associates.

    The move is part of Ford CEO Alan Mulally’s plan to bring production in line with demand, something that has helped the company to post ecord profit margins in North America.

    Source: Bloomberg

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    So with Record Profit margins, how about paying off some debt and paying off their Union owed benefits. Company's seem to love to pay out crazy amounts of cash to executives during good times and ignor their financial obligations and then when things go bad, they leave those obligations for the tax payers to pickup.

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    In regards to these two hybrids, pricing is an issue for people to buy them. If a person can afford the price of a hybrid, they are buying higher level auto's. I think the C-Max and Focus Hybrids are very pricey for the income level that the focus tends to cover.

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    uh, there is no Focus hybrid. The Focus is a standard gasoline car or an all electric car and the C-Max is a hybrid that happens to be built on the same line.

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    Really? The story reads Focus and C-max Hybrids, plural so I took it to mean they both had one. Have not looked at the focus line other than what is posted here.

    So I see on their web site they have a $35K Focus Electric. OUCH.

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