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    Revealed! 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport


    • A warm, not hot sports sedan


    There's a new member to Hyundai Elantra family. Today, the Korean automaker revealed the 2017 Elantra Sport.

     

    The Elantra Sport stands out from other Elantras thanks to small design changes as a blacked-out grille, slightly aggressive body kit, and a set of 20-inch aluminum wheels. The interior boasts some subtle changes such as a set of sport seats with red stitching and a flat-bottom steering wheel.

     

    Power comes from a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder that is said to produce 'more than' 200 horsepower and 190 pound-feet of torque. Hyundai will offer a six-speed manual or a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Underneath, the Elantra Sport features a fully independent rear suspension setup instead of the torsion beam setup found on other Elantras.

     

    Hyundai says the Elantra Sport will arrive in the fourth quarter of this year. This is when we'll likely get the final power figures and pricing.

     

    Source: Hyundai

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport Unlocks Passion, Power and Performance

    • 1.6 Turbo GDI engine and independent multi-link rear suspension highlight the most powerful and dynamic Hyundai Elantra ever


    FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., July 12, 2016 – Today at a meeting of the Washington Automotive Press Association in Alexandria, VA, Hyundai Motor America unveiled the all-new 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport. The most powerful Elantra model ever, the Sport benefits from a variety of important powertrain, chassis and styling upgrades over the current SE, Eco, and Limited models.

     


    The Elantra Sport is powered by a 1.6 Turbo GDI four-cylinder engine generating more than 200 hp and 190 lb-ft of torque. Drivers may choose between a six-speed manual transmission or seven-speed Dual Clutch Transmission with paddle shifters. Helping to ensure the most powerful Elantra ever is also the most fun to drive, the Sport is exclusively outfitted with an independent multi-link rear suspension designed to elevate on-road dynamics and feel. Finally, Elantra Sport is visually differentiated with unique bodywork and model-specific interior appointments such as a flat-bottomed steering wheel, sport seats and red contrast stitching.

     


    “Elantra Sport demonstrates our commitment to providing drivers with compelling vehicle choices that align with their interests,” says Mike Evanoff, Hyundai Motor America manager of product planning. “This is a vehicle that reflects our own passion for cars and driving, expressing it with sharp looks, proven in-car technology, upgraded power, and fun, sporty handling.”

     

    The Hyundai Elantra Sport will arrive in North American showrooms in the fourth quarter of 2016. Additional details, including full specifications and pricing, will be available closer to the on-sale date.

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    Intersting, should garner more than a few sales initially. I like the more subdued look and subtle sporty body kit. I am underwhelmed by the pathetic motor. 

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    It certainly raises an eyebrow. I'll be curious to try it out to see whether its typical Hyundai or if its something special for once. 

     

    How's the motor pathetic? It's right in line with the Fiesta, the Veloster Turbo and VW's GTI...

     

    I'm not sure I'd go as far as pathetic, but Hyundai's turbo engines have been underwhelming. They have a history of putting out competitive numbers, but without competitive results. The current 2.0 turbo is a prime example. The 1.6 seems to deliver more of its promise, so perhaps it won't be so bad. I just don't see it actually competing with the likes of a VW GLI, especially when that engine is well documented as being underrated by VW. Not to mention Hyundai's so-so reputation of suspension tuning.

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    Sounds good on paper.  Cheers for the availability of a manual to go with the sport. 

     

    I wish GM would bring their 1.6T over from Europe in more than just the Cascada, it gets rave reviews over there and has about the same spec as this Hyundai unit.... though 10 more lb-ft of torque in top tune.

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