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    One In Five Vehicles In The U.S. Has Been Hit With A Recall


    • Or about 52 Million Vehicles In Total

    2014 will likely go down as the year of the recall in the automotive industry. General Motors is the champion with the most recalls so far with 70 recalls as of today, but other OEMs have been making their mark with their own recalls.

    CNNMoney crunched the numbers on the recalls so far in 2014 and figured out that there has been a total of 544 recalls, about two a day. Those 544 recalls have affected 52 million vehicles in the U.S., or about 1 in 5 vehicles. While that figure is disturbing to say in the least, it's made worse as that number has eclipsed the previous record of 30.8 million vehicles back in 2004. With only a couple months left in the year, there's a good chance that we could see a doubling of the 30.8 million vehicles.

    What's the cause for this increase in recalls? Mike Rozembajgier, a vice president at Stericycle said the reason for the increase is twofold. OEMs are putting greater diligence on identifying problems and cars are getting more complex.

    "We all want our cars to do far more than they did in the past. It takes a lot of gadgets to make that happen, and that adds to complexity," said Rozembajgier.

    Source: CNNMoney

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Out Standing plus this drives home quality and will end up with long term reliability. I see nothing wrong with the OEM's jumping to repair issues sooner rather than later and it should help the engineering and testing efforts for newer auto's. All good stuff for consumers.

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